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'Praise Song for My Mother'

Prezi for Yr10s
by

Paul Hanson

on 2 October 2014

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Transcript of 'Praise Song for My Mother'

'Praise Song for My Mother'
by Grace Nichols

You were
water to me
deep and bold and fathoming

You were
moon’s eye to me
pull and grained and mantling

You were
sunrise to me
rise and warm and streaming

You were
the fishes red gill to me
the flame tree’s spread to me
the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell
replenishing replenishing

Go to your wide futures, you said
Aim: to develop awareness of a poem's 'layers of meaning', its various connotations.

Objective: to produce a display poster which shows your depth of understanding of these connotations.
Connotations are the ideas you associate with a symbol.
Symbols can be anything from words to pictures to people, clothes or places.
New vocabulary:
to mantle is to cloak or shroud
a fathom is a unit or depth (6 feet/1.8 m)
the 'plantain' is a close relative of the banana
a 'flame tree' is a tree with brightly-covered leaves
to replenish is to fill up or re-nourish
Starter: what do these images make you think of? Jot down your responses next to each image.
'Praise Song for My Mother'

You were
water to me
deep and bold and fathoming

You were
moon’s eye to me
pull and grained and mantling

You were
sunrise to me
rise and warm and streaming

You were
the fishes red gill to me
the flame tree’s spread to me
the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell
replenishing replenishing

Go to your wide futures, you said
Follow, as I read the poem on your desk. Consider who is speaking, to whom and about what.
You were
water to me
deep and bold and fathoming

You were
moon’s eye to me
pull and grained and mantling

You were
sunrise to me
rise and warm and streaming

You were
the fishes red gill to me
the flame tree’s spread to me
the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell
replenishing replenishing

Go to your wide futures, you said
Now, cut out the images and stick them next to the appropriate line in the poem.
'Rose'
Love.
St Valentine's Day.
A girl's name.
English Emblem.
French word for pink.
A type of wine.
Now that you know who the poem is directed at, what connotations do those images now conjure in you?
On your display, write down what the speaker's mother meant to her in these words and phrases.
Peer Assessment: go and examine two other groups' displays. Comment on their analysis of the images and emotions in the poem. Be sure to stick your feedback sheet.
Now, write three PEACE paragraphs about these images (metaphors) in your books, remembering the assessment criteria.
E grade: familiarity and some use of evidence.
D grade: appropriate evidence with limited understanding.
C grade: real insight into meaning and methods used.
B grade: C criteria, plus focus on key words and effect on reader.
A grade: all C and B with 'layers of meaning'.
Now let's consider the poem's structure.
How is it set out?
Why do you think this is?
You were
water to me
deep and bold and fathoming

You were
moon’s eye to me
pull and grained and mantling

You were
sunrise to me
rise and warm and streaming

You were
the fishes red gill to me
the flame tree’s spread to me
the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell
replenishing replenishing

Go to your wide futures, you said
Full transcript