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Common Core/PARCC

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Karen Thro

on 8 February 2013

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Transcript of Common Core/PARCC

Our Path to the Common Core and PARCC Complex Text Comprehension Instructional
Sequence (CIS) Writing in Response
to Text Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) Stepping Stones to Student Success Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Why do we need Common Core? Intro to CCSS Text-Dependent Questions <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/27076243?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="300" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> Evidence Based Selective Response
EBSR Technology Enhanced Constructed Response TECR Prose Constructed Response
PCR <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/47961932" width="400" height="300" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> Instructional Shifts – DISCUSS What do these shifts mean for instruction in our content areas? Instructional Shifts –
because shift happens Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Coding Science & Technical Subjects

R.ST. = Reading in Science &Technical Subjects
R.ST.9-10.4
WHST = Writing in History, Science, & Technical Subjects
WHST.9-10.3 English Language Arts - Anchor Standards
"Strand" Abbreviation
RI = Reading Informational Text
RL = Reading Literature
W = Writing
SL = Speaking & Listening
L = Language

RI.6.5
RI.9-10.5 Coding Which standard(s) did you, as a group, rate at each end of the spectrum? Discussion Question
Literacy Standards Review
www.corestandards.org
Review your subject area literacy standards for writing for the appropriate grade band.

Rank the Writing standards in order
of students’ proficiency in your content
area.

1 = most proficient 10 = least proficient
Literacy Standards Review
www.corestandards.org
Review your subject area literacy standards for reading for the appropriate grade band.

Rank the reading standards in order of students’ proficiency in your content area.

1 = most proficient 10 = least proficient Discuss

What are the implications of having the same Anchor Standards across the disciplines? Literacy Standards Review http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards


Anchor Standards - Reading
Page 60 CCSSO Video Regarding
Literacy in the Disciplines
David Coleman: Literacy in the Disciplines

Please note
interesting or surprising
statements from the video. Overview & Goals Text, Task, & Instruction
Full Implementation of Common Core Literacy Standards among secondary schools in Pinellas County
Nine Discussion Platforms Literacy Standards Overview Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #1 Discuss How will your
Literacy Leadership Team
roll this out
to the entire faculty? Coding Literacy Standards - HISTORY –

R.H. = Reading History
R.H.6.2

WHST = Writing in History, Science, & Technical Subjects
WHST.6.4 Which standard(s) did you, as a group, rate at each end of the spectrum? Discussion Question Discussion Question What interesting or surprising statements did you hear from the video? Agenda Overview & Goals of Discussion Platforms
CCSSO Video Regarding Literacy in the Disciplines
Review of Literacy Standards
Three Instructional Shifts Overview Day 1, session 1
Students read one informational anchor text and write a summary.

Day 1, session 2
Students read 2 or 3 shorter informational texts related to the anchor texts (one may be multimedia) and write an analytic essay incorporating evidence from at least 2 of the sources.

Day 2
Students read one shorter piece of literature and one extended (anchor) piece of literature and write:
One narrative using/responding to a literary text
One analytic essay analyzing the texts What will PARCC look like? Based on the information presented about text complexity, what are the implications for our instructional practice? Wrap-up Discussion Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Why the Emphasis on
Text Complexity? Reader & task considerations –
In Review

How might the motivation, knowledge, and experiences of your students factor in to the Reader and Task consideration? Reader & task considerations
Teachers can best assess this dimension
professional judgment, experience, and knowledge of their students and the subject.

www.corestandards.org Reader & task considerations
Variables specific for particular readers:
motivation, knowledge, and experiences
purpose and the complexity of the task assigned

www.corestandards.org Speed Rating –
Qualitative Features Grades 6-8 text samples
Grades 9-10 text samples Example of Qualitative Rating Longitude Prize
Grade 9-10 text sample with rating Step 2: Qualitative Measures Quantitative Measure – In Review Discussion Question:
Why is it important to consider more than just the quantitative measure of text complexity? Step 1: Quantitative Measures In which of the text
complexity bands
would this text fall? 7.9 1080L ATOS Book Level: Lexile Text Measure: Common Core State Standards Quantitative Measures Ranges for
Text Complexity Grade Bands The Standards’ Model
of Text Complexity
A Three-part Model for Measuring Text Complexity Qualitative Reader and Task Quantitative Discussion Question Based on the information in the video, what are the implications for our instructional practice? Engageny.org Video – Staircase of Complexity
Staircase of Complexity Video

Please use notes pages on agenda. Brainstorm with colleagues: What makes a text complex? What makes a text complex? Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Text, Task, & Instruction Let's take a look... Instructional Shifts –
because shift happens Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Common Core Implementation Common Core State Standards
- Literacy Standards in ALL Content Areas (2012-13)
- English Language Arts Standards (phased in) K-12 READING PLAN Agenda Overview & Goals
EngageNY Video Regarding Text Complexity (15 minutes)
Text Complexity Review
Why the Emphasis on Text Complexity?
Review of Three Instructional Shifts
PARCC Assessments Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #2 Warning:
You Are About To Work Hard
(But You’ll Be Glad You Did) Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #2 Text Complexity Overview Text, Task, & Instruction QUALITATIVE MEASURE – IN REVIEW Dare to compare…
How did you rate the texts?
What features did you note? *Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL:
http://doc.renlearn.com/KMNet/R004572117GKC46B.pdf Common Core Learning Standards Quantitative Measures Ranges for
Text Complexity Grade Bands Let’s take a look at the text, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Let’s imagine we want to see where a text falls on the quantitative measures “leg” of the text complexity triangle, using either the Lexile text measures or the ATOS book level (or both). Step 1: Quantitative Measures Quantitative dimensions
of text complexity Quantitative Typically measured
by computer software.

Word Length or Frequency
Sentence Length
Text Cohesion Qualitative
Attentive Human Reader
Structure
Language Conventionality & Clarity
Knowledge Demands
Levels of Meaning or Purpose


www.corestandards.org Qualitative dimensions
of text complexity
Hold on to your text from Platform #3—you will use it to write text-dependent questions with your text in Platform #5: Text-Dependent Questions & Your Text. You will need to bring your text for Discussion Platform #5. #4: Overview of
Text-Dependent Questions

#5: Text-Dependent Questions and YOUR Text Next Up:
LLT Discussion Platforms #4 & #5 What are the Core Understandings
and Key Ideas of Your Text?
Add this to your planning template.

Read Appendix A: pages 33 & 34.

Choose the Best Words to Teach—
Identify Tier 2 and Tier 3 words from your text and add the words to your planning template. Homework Tier 2 Words (General Academic Words)
Words are generally useful for students to know and are likely to encounter with some frequency in their reading
Not unique to a particular discipline –and are not the clear responsibility of a particular content area teacher

Tier 3 Words (Discipline-Specific)
Words that are important to understanding a specific reading selection or concept. What about the Vocabulary?
A quick introduction… Do or do not... there is no try. -Yoda With a partner, use the
Text Complexity Chart to discuss:
1. The range of complexity
From easy to complex &
For each text characteristic

2. How does text complexity impact:
Your content area instruction?
Student learning in your content area classroom? Rating Your Text The tools Florida uses for rating text are:

Common Core Standards Qualitative Features of Text Complexity—Explained

Qualitative Dimensions of Text Complexity Charts by grade band Text Complexity & YOUR Text
Qualitative Dimensions—

Require a human…or two

Let’s get started! Text Complexity & YOUR Text Quantitative Measure—using computer software:

ATOS—use the following link: http://www.renlearn.com/atos/analyze.aspx?type=3
Lexile—use the following link: http://lexile.com/
Flesche-Kincaid—use Microsoft Office Word Shift 3: Regular practice with
complex text and its
academic language Text, Task, & Instruction Let's take a look... Because shift happens with text, too…
It changes drastically across grades 4-12.
It increases in length & complexity:
abstract vocabulary terms
dense concepts
network of related concepts
sentence structure
text organization
(text structure) Text, Task, & Instruction Why the Emphasis on Text Complexity? Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Why the Emphasis on
Text Complexity? Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #3 Text Complexity &
YOUR text Steps for Rating Your Text Each passage should be read by at least two people (or more)

List the evidence from the passage for the features of text complexity in each category using the criteria from the Common Core Standards Qualitative Features of Text Complexity—Explained

Using your best judgment, rate the passage on each grade band for each category as well.

Rate the overall placement of the passage with justification as simple, moderate, or complex. Text Complexity & YOUR Text
Keeping in mind
the Reader & Task—

The inherent difficulty of reading and comprehending a text combined with the variables of both the reader and task. Text, Task, & Instruction Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. CCSS Anchor
Reading Standard 10 : Remember the 3 parts? Reader and Task Refer to Appendix A, page 4, for more information… The Standards’ Model
of Text Complexity
A Three-part Model for Measuring Text Complexity Qualitative Quantitative What are the Core Understandings
and Key Ideas of Your Text?
Add this to your planning template.

Read Appendix A: pages 33 & 34.

Choose the Best Words to Teach—
Identify Tier 2 and Tier 3 words from your text and add the words to your planning template. Homework Review Text-Dependent Questions with
YOUR nonfiction text.

You will need a piece of complex text from your curriculum that would require a close reading. Next Up:
LLT Discussion Platform #5 Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Why Text-Dependent Questions? Based on the information presented about text-dependent questions, what are the implications for our instructional practice? Discussion Question When you're writing or reviewing a set of questions, consider the following three categories:
Questions that assess themes and central ideas
Questions that assess knowledge of vocabulary
Questions that assess syntax and structure Three Types of
Text-Dependent Questions Note the steps in bold print. Guide for Writing Text-Dependent Questions Can only be answered with evidence from the text.

Can be literal (checking for understanding) but must also involve analysis, synthesis, evaluation. Text-Dependent Questions... Based on the information in the video, what are the implications for our instructional practice? Discussion Question

Text-Based Answers

Please use notes pages on agenda.


1 What was formerly Shift 4 has been incorporated
into Shift 2. Engageny.org Video –
Common Core in ELA/Literacy:
Shift 4: Text-Based Answers1 Brainstorm with colleagues. What Makes a Question Text-Dependent? Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Instructional Shifts –
because shift happens Agenda
Overview & Goals
EngageNY Core Video (10 minutes)
Overview of Text-Dependent Questions
Steps for Writing Text-Dependent Questions
What 6th & 9th Graders Are Doing in Language Arts...& What They Can Do In Your Content
Next Steps – Planning for Roll-out to Faculty Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #4 Text-Dependent Questions Overview How will your
Literacy Leadership Team Roll this out to the entire faculty? Roll Out Identify Reverse-engineered or backwards-designed
Crucial for creating an overarching set of successful questions
Critical for creating an appropriate culminating assignment Core Understanding & Key Ideas 9th grade ELA
Edgar Allan Poe’s
planning for the Raven Let's take a look... 6th grade ELA
Arthur Conan Doyle
and the making of
Sherlock Holmes Focus on word, sentence, and paragraph, as well as larger ideas, themes, or events.
Focus on difficult portions of text in order to enhance reading proficiency.
Can also include prompts for writing and discussion questions. Text-Dependent Questions... Low-level, literal, or recall questions
Focused on comprehension strategies
Just questions… Text-Dependent Questions are not… Depth versus Breadth Close Reading Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #4 Warning:
You Are About To Work Hard
(Again) For many subject areas, this will come from a textbook.

What other resources are available? What Text Will You Bring for Discussion Platform #5? Depth versus Breadth Close Reading Who was George Washington? Non-Example Example According to the text, what characteristics enabled George Washington to be an exemplary military leader?
themes and central ideas
knowledge of vocabulary
syntax and structure
create performance task Identify the central idea of the text.
Using the seven-step guide, focus on portions of the text that would challenge students.
Determine which type of text-dependent questions would work with those challenging portions of the text: In a Nutshell Text-Dependent Questions—
a quick review Text-based
Performance Tasks Overview Next Up:

LLT Discussion Platform #6 Based on your work and the information reviewed about text-dependent questions, what are the implications for our instructional practice? Discussion Question Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Why Text-Dependent Questions? What are your thoughts on the process?

What feedback can you offer on the question sets? Discussion Question
Using the Guide for Creating Text-Dependent Questions handout, work individually or with colleagues to create a series of text-dependent questions and tasks. Your Turn...
After closely reading YOUR complex text, please reread the text and annotate it, noting key vocabulary, structure, language, and meaning demands evident in the text. Your Turn... Sample Set of
Text-Dependent Questions
for
President Abraham Lincoln’s Speech
The Gettysburg Address, 1863 Let’s Take a Look Text-dependent questions can be crafted to point students’ attention to features of text that enhance understanding. Structure &
Text-Dependent Questions Syntax can predict student performance as much as vocabulary does.
Questions and tasks addressing syntax are powerful.
Example:
In this section of the text, Feynman put the word “doing” (in the final paragraph) in italics to draw attention to it. Why is he focusing on that word, and how does it connect to the lesson his father is trying to teach him in this example? Syntax &
Text-Dependent Questions Vocabulary &
Text-Dependent Questions Example from Gettysburg Address:

What if Lincoln had used the verb “start” instead of “conceive?”

What does the word “rather” mean in this sentence? Vocabulary Which words should be taught?
Essential to understanding text
Likely to appear in future reading

Which words should get more time and attention?
More abstract words (as opposed to concrete words)
persist vs. checkpoint
noticed vs. accident
Words which are part of semantic word family
secure, securely, security, secured High School Example
from an Excerpt from Roald Dahl: Nasty Nasty

The excerpt of the text analyzes Dahl’s position as a writer of horror stories. In particular, the text emphasizes the fact that he wrote fewer short stories than many other writers of the genre – but of higher quality. Core Understanding & Key Ideas:
An Example
Middle School Example
for The Curious Case of Dr. Seuss:

The Curious Case of Dr. Seuss is a criticism of Dr. Seuss’ work, with both a positive and negative spin. Paragraphs eight and nine focus on The Sneetches, and the overall work provides insight into the complex world of Dr. Seuss – above and beyond the Cat in the Hat. Core Understanding & Key Ideas:
An Example Depth versus Breadth Close Reading Agenda
Overview & Goals
Review of Text-Dependent Questions (TDQs)
Using “Steps for Writing TDQs”, Write TDQs for YOUR Text.
Evaluate the Quality of TDQs
Next Steps – Planning for Roll-out to Faculty Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #5 Text-Dependent Questions & Your Text How will your
Literacy Leadership Team Roll this out to the entire faculty? Roll Out Revise the questions based on the feedback from colleagues and the criteria from the Checklist for Evaluating Question Quality, and add the questions to your planning template.

You will need this for LLT Discussion Platform #7: Text-based Performance Tasks & YOUR Text. Your Task
After completing the questions, please use the Checklist for Evaluating Question Quality to rate the overall quality of the questions. Your Turn... Please refer to your planning template
for your complex text… Reverse-engineered or backwards-designed
Crucial for creating an overarching set of successful questions
Critical for creating an appropriate culminating assignment Core Understanding & Key Ideas When you're writing or reviewing a set of questions, consider the following three categories:
Questions that assess themes and central ideas
Questions that assess knowledge of vocabulary
Questions that assess syntax and structure Three Types of
Text-Dependent Questions Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing, and speaking grounded evidence from text, both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Instructional Shifts –
because shift happens Literacy Leadership Team
Discussion Platform #5 Warning:
You Are About To Work Hard
(Again)
themes and central ideas
knowledge of vocabulary
syntax and structure Identify the central idea of the text.
Using the seven-step guide, focus on portions of the text that would challenge students.
Determine which type of text-dependent questions would work with those challenging portions of the text: In a Nutshell
Full transcript