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The Effects of Playing Violent Video Games

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Kat Tran

on 7 January 2014

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Transcript of The Effects of Playing Violent Video Games

The effects of violent video games have been a long debated discussion. Some argue that these games are just recreational fun and that players can distinguish real life from fantasy. Others argue that violent video games can have damaging, long-term effects. Not only could these games result in desensitization to real-life violence, many argue that it can cause aggressive behavior and delinquency in young children.
The Effects of Violent Video Games
The Effects of Playing Violent Video Games
Three longitudinal studies assessed amount of habitual video game violence (HVGV) with amount of recent physical aggressiveness after a 3-6 month time period.




Participants:
Sample 1: 181 Japanese junior high students ranging
in age from 12 to 15 years
Sample 2: 1050 Japanese students ranging in age
from 13 to 18 years
Sample 3: 364 United States 3rd, 4th, and 5th
graders ranging in age from 9 to 12 years

Lab-controlled study where participants were told that the purpose of the study was to evaluate different types of media, not the effects of violent video games on desensitization. Heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR – skin’s ability to conduct electricity when emotionally stimulated) were to be monitored.






Participants: 257 college students (124 men and 133 women)

Acknowledging that violent video games are damaging to both psychological development and moral reasoning, we can limit exposure to these types of video games.
Discussion
Anderson, C. A., Sakamoto, A.,
Gentile, D. A., Ihori, N., Shibuya, A., Yukawa, S., . . . Kobayashi, K. (2008). Longitudinal Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggression in Japan and the United
States. PEDIATRICS, 222(5), e1067-e1072. http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1425

Introduction
This study was conducted in order to measure the effects of physiological desensitization, since past research on violent video game exposure tends to focus on increased “aggressive thoughts, angry feelings, physiological arousal, aggressive behaviors, and decreases helpful behaviors (Carnagey, Anderson, & Bushman, 2007).”










Hypothesis: Exposure to video game violence results in less physiological arousal to real life violence.

The key findings from the two studies concluded that playing violent video games can cause an increase of aggressive behavior in younger children, as well as desensitization to real-life violence in adults.
Introduction
Summary
Application
Method
Procedure
Method
Procedure
Study 1
This study was conducted to test whether exposure to violent games increased physical aggression over time in school children from both high (United States) and low (Japan) violence cultures.
Hypothesis: Exposure to violent video games early in the school year would predict changes in aggression later in the school year.
Finger electrodes placed on the three middle fingers of the non-dominant hand for 5 min to measure baseline HR & GSR
Participants reported the number of hours per week they spent playing video games and the percent of time spent playing violent video games

Completed the nine-item Physical Aggression subscale of the Aggression Questionnaire

Participants played a randomly assigned violent or nonviolent video game for 20 min
2nd set of HR and GSR rates were measured for 5 min
Participants were then asked to rate the video game they played based on given descriptions (violent, boring, exciting, etc.) on a 10 point scale
Participants watched a 10-min videotape of violent, real life accounts (court-room outbursts, police confrontations, shootings, and prison fights) while HR and GSR were monitored
Results

Violent video game players were less aroused by real-life violence than nonviolent video game players were.

Results
Habitual video game violence predicted physical aggression 3 to 6 months later in all three samples of school children.









Study 2
Carnagey, N. L., Anderson, C. A., &
Bushman, B. J. (2007). The effect of video game violence on physiological desensitization to real-life violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology,43, 489-496. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2006.05.003

References

Anderson, C. A., Sakamoto, A., Gentile, D. A., Ihori, N., Shibuya, A., Yukawa, S., . . .

Kobayashi, K. (2008). Longitudinal Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggression

in Japan and the United States. PEDIATRICS, 222(5), e1067-e1072.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1425

Berk, L. E. (2011). Exploring Lifespan Development (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn &

Bacon.

Carnagey, N. L., Anderson, C. A., & Bushman, B. J. (2007). The effect of video game

violence on physiological desensitization to real-life violence. Journal of

Experimental Social Psychology, 43, 489-496.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2006.05.003


Heart rate and galvanic skin response decreased in violent video game players while watching filmed violence.

Heart rate and galvanic skin response increased in nonviolent video game players while watching filmed violence.
Desensitized Response
Violent
Video Game
(Carnagey, Anderson, & Bushman, 2007)
Alternative to violent games:

Video games rated “E” for
“everyone” (all ages)
Engage in productive hobbies, such as reading, sports, or a taking up musical instrument; instead of playing video games.
If children do play video games, parents should be careful of rating guides in order to make sure the game is age appropriate.
Beginning
of school
year
End of school year (3-6 months later)
Start of experiment
Gender and previous aggressiveness controlled in all samples
- Increased aggression.
- Increased violent
video game play.
Boys were reported to be more aggressive than girls.

Boys were reported to have played more
video games than girls.

(US children ages 9-12)
(Japanese children ages 12-15)
(Japanese children ages 13-18)
Frequency
of violent
game play
X
Reports
of
aggression
Rating of
violent
content
indicated
(Anderson et al., 2008)
End of experiment
Developmental
Concerns
Subconscious
mind

Personal Fable
Teenagers are vulnerable to risky behaviors due to inflated sense of importance.

"That won't happen to me!"

Moral Development
Morals can become skewed when desensitization occurs.

(Violent acts seen as normal)
Piaget's
Formal Operational Stage
Children around the age of 11 only just begin have the capacity to think logically.
This research impacts our daily lives because it provides us with the knowledge that we can prevent incidences of juvenile delinquency and crime. We can prevent children from gaining increased aggression (which can lead to delinquent acts) due to violent video game play. We also have the power to prevent desensitization to violence (since people who are desensitized might not report or ignore violent acts and crimes.)

We can prevent harmful behaviors from forming.
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