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D. H. Lawrence

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Helen Regan

on 14 September 2018

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Transcript of D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
Biography
Style
Call into Death
Theme:
Death. Lawrence believed that death is the typical condition of what he values most in human existence. His vision of death is related to his experience. His mother’s death and his poor health drove him to contemplate and reflect on life and death.
Piano
Themes:
memory, mother-child relationship, and longing.
Delight of Being Alone
Symbol:
The
moon
(eternity/immortality)
the
ash tree
(a tree that joined the three worlds: the underworld, the middle earth, and the spiritual realm. The ash tree is also linked with the blending of the past, present, and future. )
the
north
(mature wisdom, insight and keen mindedness)
wind
(
change)
Humming-Bird
The Mosquito
Bavarian Gentians
Birth:
David Herbert Lawrence was born in 1885 in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire
Writing history:
He published many novels and poetry volumes during his lifetime, including
Sons and Lovers
and
Women in Love
, but is best known for his infamous
Lady Chatterley's Lover.
Censored:
Lady C's Lover was graphic and highly sexual. It was published in Italy in 1928, but was banned in the United States until 1959, and in England until 1960.
Family:
Lower socio-economic background. His mother instilled in him a love of books and a strong desire to rise above his blue-collar beginnings
Scandal:
Lawrence broke off his own engagement to run away with a friend's wife; Frieda von Richthofen (German). The couple eloped to Germany.
WWI and Censorship:
Lawrence's work continued to be censored. He retreated to Cornwall but the presence of a controversial writer and his German wife so near the coast appeared to be a wartime security threat. He was banished from Cornwall.
Exile:
Lawrence traveled to around Europe, North America, Central America and Australia.
Breaking taboos:
His intention in writing
Lady Chatterley's Lover
was to challenge the British establishment’s taboos around sex, to enable men and women "…to think sex, fully, completely, honestly, and cleanly."
Death:
He died on 2 March 1930 at the Villa Robermond in Vence, France, from complications of tuberculosis.
Philip Larkin: "Sexual intercourse began/In 1963/Between the end of the 'Chatterley' ban/And the Beatles' first LP."
Later style:
r
eviled as a crude and pornographic writer. After his exile, he abandoned rigid forms of poetry:
Language:
known for his linguistic precision
Goal:
Lawrence himself considered his writings an attempt to challenge and expose what he saw as the constrictive and oppressive cultural norms of modern Western culture.
Movement:
Georgian poetry included a respect for formalism (excessive adherence to prescribed
forms
) as well as bucolic (relating to the
pleasant aspects of the countryside
and country life) and romantic subject matter (
imagination and emotions
).
"We can get rid of the stereotyped movements and the old hackneyed associations of sound or sense. We can break down those artificial conduits and canals through which we do so love to force our utterance. We can break the stiff neck of habit […] But we cannot positively prescribe any motion, any rhythm."
Free verse:
This allows Lawrence to engage with unrivaled observation and symbolism.
Pathetic fallacy and personification:
the pathetic fallacy, the tendency to ascribe human emotions to animals and even inanimate objects.
Themes:
Nature, religion, love, relationships.
https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/call-death
Mystery
: There is a unique and keen awareness, a genuine sensitivity and sensibility to understand the mystery and the whole process of life and death. Lawrence is highly captivated by the perpetual mystery of creation and destruction - life and death.
Elegy:
a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead
Ambiguity:
it is difficult to ascertain if the speaker is lamenting a lover or a child.
Repetition:
words and phrases of endearment are repeated. Shows the sense of loss and mourning.
Syntax:
punctuation is used to express intense emotion.
Time:
the music and the time of day compliment each other. Soft and full of fading light.
Rhyme:
regular end-rhymes (aabb, ccdd, eeff). The rhyme and use of punctuation adds to the setting/tone of the poem.
Tone:
quiet and content but also distant. "a" child and "a" mother. The memory is distant or the speaker has distanced himself from the memory.
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44580/piano
Music:
the change in music shows a change in tone and mood. From calm and peaceful to "insidious".
Greek meaning:
Nostos (return), algos (suffering). Nostalgia, as an act, is painful to go through.
Form:
Free verse. The structure is in short paragraphs which shows the train of thought of the speaker.
Questions:
The speaker is engaged with the subject matter. He is fascinated with it and wants to find out as much as possible.
Tone:
Disapproving but intrigued.
Contrast:
the poem is filled with conflicting and contrasting ways of describing the mosquito. It leaves the reader confused.
Relationship:
Although the mosquito is lighter "than air" it has a dominating effect on the speaker.
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47359/the-mosquito
Personification:
the mosquito is given a smile.
Accuracy:
Lawrence was precise in describing the mosquito to bring it to life.
Context:
D.H. Lawrence wrote this poem when he was dying. It was not published during his lifetime.
https://betterlesson.com/community/document/1918567/delight-of-being-alone-by-dh-lawrence-docx
Tone:
confident and content.
Personification:
the moon and the ash tree.
Difference:
The speaker shows that there is a great difference between being lonely and being alone.
Context:
This imagines a time and place when humans were not present.
No religion
No flowers. the setting is in a geological time.
Contrast:
Uses words from modern day in describing the past.
Word choice:
Lawrence is precise in his choice of words to set the scene.
Language:
gives a sense of uncertainty but allows his imagination to explore the possibilities. Repetition is used to show the passing of time. The language used is vivid and full of unusual ideas.
Tone:
casual, humorous and, sometimes, throwaway.
Musicality:
There is a slow, sad and seductive music to this poem. This is achieved through the use of alliteration, rhyme and punctuation.
Themes:
darkness, longing, light/darkness, paganism/Christianity, male desire, sex, male dominance and confrontation of mortality
Structure:
free verse. This allows for the thought process to flow freely.
Tone:
Calm, sincere, and gentle. There is an urgent tone towards the end of the poem.
Gentians:
Herb. Gentian is used for digestion problems such as loss of appetite, fullness, intestinal gas, diarrhea, gastritis, heartburn, and vomiting. Lawrence was very sick when he was writing this poem.
The Underworld:
Mentions Persephone,Demeter, Pluto, and Dis. Michaelmas marks the "dying" of the year (seasons).
https://www.shmoop.com/persephone-demeter-hades/hades-pluto-character.html
Use of colour:
Pluto's realm is sensuously evoked through dark and smoky colours. Light colours are used to show the darkness of the Underworld rather than hope and positivity.
https://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/Classic%20Poems/Lawrence/humming_bird.htm
http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/bavarian-gentians/
Full transcript