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Lessons Learned From the Field: How Teacher Educators Can Support the Induction of Beginning Special Education Teachers

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Rachel Thomas

on 19 July 2011

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Transcript of Lessons Learned From the Field: How Teacher Educators Can Support the Induction of Beginning Special Education Teachers

Lessons Learned From the Field:
How Teacher Educators Can Support the
Induction of Beginning Special Education Teachers

OSEP
July 19, 2011 NCIPP: National Center to Inform Policy and Practice in
Special Education Professional Development To improve teacher quality and increase
commitment to teaching students with disabilities by:
informing special education policy and practice on induction and mentoring
identifying and recommending induction and mentoring implementation strategies Rationale

The majority of states require some form of induction to support beginning teachers
To stabilize the field in terms of both quantity and quality, novices must be well prepared
NCATE provides guidelines that include partnerships between IHEs and LEAs as a way to ease the transition for beginners How are you partnering with local schools or districts to support pre-service or in-service teacher development? Background of the Study The literature on induction in special education shows mentoring as the main support provided to beginners Caution: the majority of research in this area is “soft”, focusing on satisfaction, and technical aspects of mentoring Little is known about what is involved in the actual mentoring sessions and the efficacy of the interactions Setting Large, urban district Longstanding induction program Program is centered on teacher development through evaluation Typically close to 100 beginning teachers annually (30 special educators) District serves approximately 35,000 students, primarily African American (68.8%) Data Collection and Analysis www.ncipp.org Personnel Improvement Center www.personnelcenter.org Meg Kamman, Erica McCray, Maya Israel Phoebe Gillespie Discussion Questions How do you follow-up or maintain relationships with graduates of your programs? How do you ensure your graduates meet district needs? New Teacher Center www.newteachercenter.org Alyson Mike IHEs can help by keeping the door open and providing ongoing access to resources and professional developement. Lesson 1
Beginners cite many concerns. The top three concerns include instruction, behavior, and procedures. IHEs can help by teaching collaboration to beginning teachers and veterans.
Initiating relationships
Focus on practice
Assistance with challenges IHEs can help by teaching strategies to access support in focused ways.
Support can be accessed on and off campus.
Classroom support- focus on evaluation assisted in improving beginning teacher quality
Emotional support- venting is important, but focusing on solution impacts overall satisfaction Lesson 2
Beginners crave collegial support and value learning from veterans. Lesson 3
Beginning special education teachers need focused support. What we found NCIPP: National Center to Inform Policy and Practice in
Special Education Professional Development www.ncipp.org Meg Kamman, Erica McCray, Maya Israel ncipp@coe.ufl.edu
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