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Differentiated Instruction

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Amy Shapton

on 29 March 2014

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Transcript of Differentiated Instruction

Differentiated Instruction
Source : http://www.youtube.com /watch?v=i6rEy3Lqfio
Agenda
What is Differentiated Instruction?
Where Do I Start?
4 Classroom Elements Teachers Differentiate
Principles of Differentiation
What Differentiated Instruction Looks Like in the Classroom
What is Differentiated Instruction?
Differentiated Instruction is tailoring instruction to meet the individual needs of the learners.
This allows for all students to access curriculum at their level, in a way that is designed for their success. Teachers differentiate
content
,
the process
,
products
and the
classroom environment
. Through the use of
ongoing assessment
and
flexible grouping
, differentiation is a successful approach to instruction.

Differentiated instruction
is occurring whenever a teacher varies his/her teaching in order to
create the best learning experience possible
when working with an individual, small group, or whole class.
Tomlinson, C. A. (August, 2000). Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades. ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education.
Retrieved from : http://www.readingrockets.org/article/263
Where Do I Start?
Differentiating instruction
is designed to meet the needs of the individual learners; therefore, teachers need to
begin by getting to know their students
.
Source :
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). The Differentiated Instruction Scrapbook.
Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.
Based on student readiness, interest, or learning preferences, teachers can differentiate at least 4 classroom elements.
Readiness
Interest
Learning Preferences
Readiness
Interest
Learning Preferences
4 Classroom Elements Teachers Differentiate
Readiness refers to a
starting point for a student's learning
. This can be done by determining each students' knowledge level in a specific content area.
Learning preferences are
the best ways in which individual students learn
. These preferences can be influenced by :

Gender
Culture
Classroom Environment
Learning Styles (Audio/Visual/Kinesthetic)
Multiple Intelligence

Developing lessons with the students' interest in mind is key. Taking the time to discover student interest will
help maintain their engagement within the lesson or activity
. Teaching with student interest in mind allows for students to make connections between their learning and the world around them,
linking students' experience and new learning
.
http://www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks1/ict/multiple_int/questions/choose_lang.cfm


Source :
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). Reach Every Student Through Differentiated Instruction (Brochure).
Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.
Source :
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). Reach Every Student Through Differentiated
Instruction (Brochure). Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.
Content
Process
Product
Learning Environment
Content refers to the ways in which students gain access to information and what the students needs to know.
Content is what we want the students to know, understand, and be able to do
.
"When teachers
differentiate content
, they may
adapt
what they want the students to learn or how the students will gain the knowledge, understanding and skills,
without varying student objectives or lowering performance standards for students
. They use
teaching strategies
and tools that are
appropriate for each individual student
so that
everyone has an equal opportunity to succeed
. While the content is differentiated to meet the individual needs,
all students are working towards the same standards and objectives
." (Tomlinson, 2000)
Tomlinson, C. A. (August, 2000). Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades. ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education.
Process is the
way in which we teach
. Teachers
design activities to engage students
in order for them to
think

about the key concepts, principles and information in which they are learning about.
"The process of differentiating instruction for students depends on the ongoing use of assessment to gather information about where students are in their learning and about their readiness, interests and learning preferences. Teachers use this information to vary the learning environment, instruction, and assessment and evaluation." (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2010)


Source :
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). Reach Every Student Through Differentiated Instruction (Brochure).
Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.
The process of differentiating instruction is the method of carrying out the lessons and assignments that have been prepared based on having assessed your students on readiness, interests, and learning preferences. Without having this 'diagnostic' knowledge through getting to know your students, it is difficult to organize activities and assessments to be of benefit to each learner.
Products are
the ways in which students show what they have learned or have extended their knowledge
. It is important to differentiate the product, as it allows each student an
equal opportunity to demonstrate their learning and understanding
.
Examples of Possible Products :
- Essays - Advertisements - Newspaper Article
- Brochure - Collage - Cartoon or Comic Strip
- Poster - Bulletin Board - Demonstration
- Project - Speech - Illustrate and Explain
- Webcast - Performance - Presentation
- Journal - Make a Game - Skit or Play
- Letter - Interview - Short Story
- Tests (Multiple Choice, Matching, Short Answer, T/F)
The classroom environment plays an important role in teaching and learning.
The learning environment is the way in which the classroom looks, feels and works.
The classrooms needs:
Warm, safe and inviting
Respectful, collaborative
Sense of community and belonging
Provide opportunity to develop the 5 developmental domains
Clean, spacious and organized
Easily accessible
Embrace and celebrate differences
Principles of Differentiation
Flexible Learning Groups
Ongoing Assessment
Respectful Tasks
Choice
Building a Community




















http://www.youtube.com/watch ? v=3lzzZbPN-8s
Source :
Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). The Differentiated Instruction Scrapbook. Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.

Source :
Ontario Ministry of
Education. (2010).
Reach Every Student
Through Differentiated Instruction (Brochure). Ottawa: Queen's Printer
for Ontario.
What Differentiation Looks Like in the Classroom
Differentiation looks like multiple ways to meet the same learning goal
, based on readiness and interest of the student, where students are provided with choices in individual, small group or large group settings. It is important to 'debrief' and 'share their learning' as
students learning from other students helps to synthesize new information with previous knowledge.
Other Ways to Differentiate
Source:
Middendorf, C. (2009).
The Scholastic Differentiated Instruction Plan Book
. Scholastic Teaching Resources.

• Learning Centres or Stations • Experiential Learning
• Provide Interest Centers • Varying the Length of Time
• Memorization • Reciprocal teaching
• Graphic Organizers • Scaffolding
• Webbing • Self Talk
• WebQuests • Guided Notes
• Anticipation Guide • Concept Map
• Jigsaw • Think-Pair-Share
• Venn Diagram • Menus
• Develop Personal Agendas for Completion of Work
• Manipulatives (or) Hands on Supports

• Thinking Time
• Choice Boards
• Learning Contracts
• RAFTs (Role, Audience, Format, Topic)
• Use Tiered Activities
• Exit Card/Ticket Out The Door
• Mind Map
• Thinking Routines (KWL, See/Think/
Wonder, Claim/Question/Support)
Examples of Differentiated Instruction
Sources :
Office of Instructional Enhancement and Internal Operations/Office of Special Education, 2013

Activity Time
Your Task :
Take the following instructional objective and identify 2 differentiation strategies that could be used to teach or assess the objective.
Objective :
Students will create a report on the book, "Charlotte's Web".
Janelle likes to be asked to do things by the teacher. She is interested in fitting in and speaks out often in class. She has a wild imagination and loves to read, but her comprehension skills are below grade level.

Dan is hyperactive and likes to dance around the room when class is near the end. He is an audio/visual learner, is a solid reader, and enjoys excelling and being “the best.” He gets very excited to start new books, but they don’t hold his attention for long.

Wayne does not feel a connection to school. He is a very intelligent student, but he “follows.” He seems to do well in every type of activity when he applies himself. He has exhibited strong reading skills, but does not always complete work.

Josh failed reading three times. He is an expert hunter and fisherman and knows more about the outdoors than anyone. He seems to learn best with hands-on activities. His reading and writing skills have only slightly improved over the last two years.

Lana is a very quick learner. She seems to get things just by listening. She likes to excel. She is very concerned about rules and right vs. wrong. She is a natural leader. Her reading and writing skills are both above grade level.
Activity Adapted from Office of Instructional Enhancement and Internal Operations/Office of Special Education, 2013

Identify the Pros and Cons of Using Both Strategies in a Class of 25 Students that Includes these Five Students
Final Thoughts, Questions, Comments or Concerns?
Evaluation
References
Birmingham City Council. (2014). BGFL Multiple Intelligences (Online). Retrieved from: http://www.bgfl.org/
bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks1/ict/multiple_int/questions/choose_lang.cfm

Google Search: Differentiated Instruction (Tree Climbing Assessment Cartoon)

Hansen, T. (2013) Differentiated Instruction in the Hollywood Classroom. Retrieved from:
http://www.youtube.com /watch?v=i6rEy3Lqfio

Middendorf, C. (2009). The Scholastic Differentiated Instruction Plan Book. Scholastic Teaching Resources.

Office of Instructional Enhancement and Internal Operations/Office of Special Education, 2013

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). Reach Every Student Through Differentiated Instruction (Brochure).
Ottawa: Queen's Printer for Ontario.

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2010). The Differentiated Instruction Scrapbook. Ottawa: Queen's Printer for
Ontario.

Pappkr1. (2009). Differentiated Instruction - Some Ideas for the Classroom. Retrieved from:
http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=3lzzZbPN-8s

Tomlinson, C. A. (August, 2000). Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades. ERIC Digest. ERIC
Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education. Retrieved from :
http://www.readingrockets.org/article/263

Tomlinson, C. (1995). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association
for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Tomlinson, C. (2000). Reconcilable Differences: STandards-Based Teaching and Differentiation. Educational
Leadership, 58(1).


Source:
Middendorf, C. (2009).
The Scholastic Differentiated Instruction Plan Book
. Scholastic Teaching Resources.
Full transcript