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Simple Sentences, Independent and Dependent Clauses

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Jillian Smoragiewicz

on 12 September 2016

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Transcript of Simple Sentences, Independent and Dependent Clauses

First, let's review...
Results
Compound subjects and predicates
Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences
The Clause
San Francisco
Budapest
OK, let's practice...
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
(cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr
(cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr
Stockholm
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
Simple Sentences
Simple sentences ALWAYS have a subject and a predicate
The
subject
tells what the sentence is about.
The wise student
wrote her notes.
The
simple subject
is the simplest form of the subject of the sentence.
The wise
student
wrote her notes.
The
predicate
is the part of the sentence that shows the action. It tells what the subject does.
Jessie
lives in Lexington
.
The
simple predicate
is the KEY VERB in the predicate part of the sentence.
Jessie
lives
in Lexington.
The beautiful and vain queen gazed lovingly into her mirror.
Nobody at Clarke Middle School likes the cafeteria food.
Jane listens to music in the morning.
With grammar, when you think of the word "compound", realize that it means "many put together"
compound = many
A compound subject is when the predicate (the verb) describes 2 or more subjects
Jack and Jill went up the hill.
This sentence has a compound subject because the verb, "went", describes what both Jack AND Jill are doing.
It's the same deal with compound predicates. A compound predicate tells two (or more) things about the subject.
Jack fell down and broke his crown.
In this sentence, there is a compound predicate because two verbs, "fell" and "broke" describe what Jack is doing.
Who,
me??
the clause is a group of related words within a sentence that contains a subject and a verb.
There are 2 main types of clauses
The Independent Clause
Independent clauses are able to stand by themselves as complete sentences.
(just like simple sentences!)
The Dependent Clause
a group of words with a subject and verb that CANNOT stand by itself as a complete sentence because it wouldn't make sense.
That I would go grocery shopping.
I promised her yesterday.
I promised her yesterday that I would go grocery shopping
Dependent clauses need to be combined with an independent clause in order to create a sentence that can stand by itself.
Example: "If I study hard."
Dependent clauses often begin with words like: if, when, that, because
Let's Practice...
If I study hard, I will ace the test.
Because she was late.
We didn't make the movie on time.
We didn't make the movie on time because she was late.
1.The doctor told Charlie to lose weight and exercise vigorously for forty-five minutes a day.

a. This sentence has two independent clauses
b. This sentence has no independent clauses
c. This sentence has one independent clause
Answer: C, there is one independent clause
Explanation: This sentence only has one subject/verb relationship: "doctor told". The rest of the sentence is the compound predicate, since both actions describe what the doctor told Charlie.
2. The doctor was worried
that Charlie was putting on too much weight.

a.) The highlighted section is an independent clause
b.) The independent clause is "The doctor was worried"
c.) This sentence has no independent clause
Answer: B, The independent clause is "The doctor was worried"
3. Charlie has decided to hire a personal trainer
because he is worried about his heart.

a.) The highlighted section is an independent clause.
b.) This sentence has two independent clauses.
c.) "Charlie has decided to hire a personal trainer" is the independent clause.
Answer: C, "Charlie has decided to hire a personal trainer" is the independent clause
for each of these sentences, ask yourself: "Who is this sentence about?" to find out the subject.
Ask your self: "What is the main action happening in the sentence?" to figure out the predicate.
Which one of these sentences is a FRAGMENT? (it is missing either a subject or a predicate.)
a.) Jerry loves his car.
b.) Everybody laughed at Stacey.
c.) Running to the store.
d.) Swimming is fun.
If it is missing either a subject or predicate, it is a FRAGMENT, not a complete sentence.
The only exception to this rule is for commands. For example, "Go to your room!" is a command. Commands do not need to have a subject to be considered a complete sentence.
Read the following sentences and determine if they are independent or dependent clauses
Independent or dependent?
dependent!
independent or dependent?
dependent!
independent or dependent?
independent!
Independent or dependent?
independent!
independent
(copy these sentences into your notes. )
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