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Essay Structure: Thinking Outside the Hamburger

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Ryan Morrison

on 17 December 2017

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Transcript of Essay Structure: Thinking Outside the Hamburger

Essay Structure: Thinking Outside the Hamburger
Introduction (hook --> thesis)
Supporting Paragraph #1
Supporting Paragraph #2
Supporting Paragraph #3
Conclusion
This is how you learned about Essays:
The internal structure of paragraphs can also be different
It's good to start with a topic sentence, but a defining quote may also work - as long as it is clear what the paragraph will be discussing.
Some paragraphs may be shorter/longer than others.
Internal paragraph structure can also depend on the essay topic and the type of essay you are writing.
Paragraph Structure
It's best to have an introduction and a conclusion which include your thesis.
Everything else is up to you!
BEWARE:
Just because you have free reign over your style and essay, doesn't mean whatever you do is "good".
If you are still unsure of your writing style, it is reasonable to stick to the "hamburger" formula.
But if you want to expand your style, now is the time.
Essay Structure
There are guidelines (things that work) for both essays and buffets:
It's a convention to get salad or appetizers first and dessert last.
It's a convention to have an introduction, and a conclusion.
There are things that don't work for both:
It's an awful idea to put EVERYTHING on your plate and mix it up into a big pile of mush.
It's an awful idea to have no structure and jump around from topic to topic without details, structure or examples.
Both have a lot to do with taste and style:
You only eat what you want to eat: amount of food, placement of food and if you have dessert are unique to your preferences.
The way you write is your own voice. Your format and word choice are subjective.
Some people have only 2 big plates of food; others have 6 smaller plates of food.
Some people write big paragraphs, others write small paragraphs.
You make different choices at Mandarin than at Golden Griddle
You make different choices depending on topic and type of essay
Why is an Essay like a buffet?
Writing is an art, and that is why there is no 100%
It is best to think critically about the path your essay is going to take before writing the first draft.
It's a good idea to have someone read it and give you feedback
Ask your reader about the flow of the essay.
Ask your reader if they were bored.
Ask them if there were any logical errors that they found.
Did it make sense?
Typos?
Remember: The best style is an invisible style.
Ok, enough with the metaphors
Usually, the paragraph after your before your conclusion paragraph -- start and finish strong.
Where do I put my strongest point?
Some Examples of paragraph structure...
Some examples of essay structure...
Topic Sentence - One of the Items (A) being compared
Aspect #1
Example
Aspect #2
Example
Aspect #3
Example
Concluding sentence
Compare/ Contrast Essays: 2 styles
This is
The Truth
about essays:
What about my counter-argument/refutation paragraph?
It's probably best to put it after your first supporting paragraph, but before your conclusion.
The reader may become confused if an opposing viewpoint comes directly after the thesis.
What if I need to summarize something?
It is standard to explain your topic in the introduction or in the following supporting paragraph.
Background sections are common in research essays.
Introduction
Summary of Topic
Comparison of #1 aspect of topic
Comparison of #2 aspect of topic
Counter-argument and refutation
Strongest point paragraph (nail in the coffin)
Conclusion
Introduction with summary
Argument #1 (Strongest point)
Argument #2
Argument #3
Counter-argument and refutation
Argument #4
Conclusion
Introduction
Cause #1
Effect of Cause #1
Cause # 2
Effect of Cause #2
Balanced comparison paragraph
Counter-argument with concession
Conclusion
Introduction
Reason #1
Reason #2
Reason #3
Counter-argument/ refutation
Reason #4 Strongest Reason
Conclusion
Topic sentence
Reason #1
Example
Reason # 2
Example
Example
Conclusion
Defining quote
Topic Sentence
Cause #1
Example
Conclusion
followed by....
Topic sentence
Effect #1 of Cause #1
Example
Effect #2 of Cause #1
Example
Quote
Topic sentence
Comparison or Contrast #1
Example
Comparison or Contrast #2
Example
Comparison or Contrast #3
Example
Conclusion
Typically, comparison or contrast essays follow one of two styles
Counter-argument #1
Refutation
Counter-argument #2
Concession
Suggestion
Style #1: Block
Topic Sentence - The other item (B) being compared
Aspect #1
Example
Aspect #2
Example
Aspect #3
Example
Concluding Sentence
You are comparing the two things
by the same aspects
Style #2: Aspect-by-Aspect
Topic Sentence - Aspect #1 comparison
Item A from this aspect
Example
Item B from this aspect
Example
Conclusion
Topic Sentence - Aspect #2 comparison
Item A from this aspect
Example
Item B from this aspect
Example
Conclusion
Topic Sentence - Aspect #3 comparison
Item A from this aspect
Example
Item B from this aspect
Example
Conclusion
You get the same information in both block and aspect-by-aspect, but they look different.
Which one is right for
my essay?
Think about your research, and start
experimenting.....
One of the main arguments against hydroelectricity is that it negatively affects rural communities that depend on rivers. Dam projects do indeed degrade or even destroy rural river communities, but the recent studies have shown that urban living increases standards of living (Sanders, 2016). Even so, many indigenous cultures have cultures that are fragile at best, and connected to the land in ways our modern society is quickly forgetting. Unfortunately, there is no direct answer to this conundrum. The needs of the modern world, in this case energy, have long taken precedence over indigenous and rural communities. Perhaps further research and political focus on this issue will address this social issue.
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