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Intertextual References in The Erl King.

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on 11 December 2013

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Transcript of Intertextual References in The Erl King.

The Erl-King
From 'Goblin Market' by Christina Rossetti
Laura started from her chair,
Flung her arms up in the air,
Clutched her hair:
"Lizzie, Lizzie, have you tasted
For my sake the fruit forbidden?
Must your light like mine be hidden,
Your young life like mine be wasted,
Undone in mine undoing,
And ruined in my ruin;
Thirsty, cankered, goblin-ridden?"
Die Erlkonig by Johann Van Goethe
Music by Franz Schubert
Light is sufficient to itself, Emily Dickinson
Light is sufficient to itself—
If others want to see
Some Hours in the Day.
It can be had on Window Panes

But not for Compensation—
It holds as large a Glow
To Squirrel in the Himmaleh
Precisely, as to you.
Intertextual References in
'Porphyria's Lover'
by Robert Browning
That moment she was mine, mine, fair,
Perfectly pure and good: I found
A thing to do, and all her hair
In one long yellow string I wound
Three times her little throat around,
And strangled her. No pain felt she;
I am quite sure she felt no pain.
Rossetti creates a strange and haunting world inhabited by horrid goblin creatures who tempt the unwary to buy their magical fruit. The poem's human protagonists, two adolescent sisters, cannot resist temptation.
In a letter to her publisher, Rossetti claimed that the poem, which is interpreted frequently as having features of remarkably sexual imagery, was not meant for children. However, in public Rossetti often stated that the poem was intended for children, and went on to write many children's poems.
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