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shakespear sonnets

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Tilman Rusam

on 5 March 2013

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Transcript of shakespear sonnets

Shakespeare and his Sonnets Characteristics Your Turn Sonnet 18 Interpretation Meter Content Structure &
Rhyme Scheme Compilation
of Sonnets History Themes Background love:
to a man
to the "Dark Lady"
woman to a man
religion "My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red, than her lips red:
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound:
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare,
As any she belied with false compare."
"[...]

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,

But no such roses see I in her cheeks;

And in some perfumes is there more delight

Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
[...]" "My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red, than her lips red:
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound:
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:

And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare,
As any she belied with false compare." "My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red, than her lips red:
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound:
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:

And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare,
As any she belied with false compare." Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. published 1609
154 Sonnets
3 parts "My mistress' eyes [...]" a
b
a
b
c
d
c
d
e
f
e
f
g
g - sonnet 130 - * / * / * / * / * /

* / * / * / * / * /

* / * / * / * / * /

* / * / * / * / * /


* = unstressed, / = stressed - strong

- strong

- strong

- strong quatrain (4) abab
quatrain (4) cdcd
quatrain (4) efef
couplet (2) gg

= 14 lines Shakespeare's iambic pentameter:

either * / * / * / * / * / (strong)
or * / * / * / * / * / * (weak) on Sonnets 1

2

3

4 "Her eyes the brightest stars the heavens hold;"
"Her pretty lips of red vermilion dye;"
"Her breast displays two silver fountains bright;"
"My Lady's hair is threads of beaten gold;" - Bartholomew Griffin



"...'Tis her breathing that
Perfumes the chamber thus:..." - from Cymbeline

"...and when she spoke
more than an earthly voice it was that sang:" - Petrarch
"The way she walked was not the way of mortals
but of angelic forms, ..." - Petrarch italian
(petrarchan)
sonnet english sonnet:

4, 4, 4, 2 lines
love to a woman
iambic pentameter 2013 1225 1520 urdu sonnet, spenserian sonnet, modern sonnet "She doesn't have any good and devine qualities,
but I love her just as much anyways." criticism of traditional practice to compare one's love to all beautiful things Thank You! Questions?
temperate: moderate, gentle
bud: blossom, flower
lease: duration

dimm'd: darkened
fair: beautiful
untrimm'd: unmodified, not stabelized

ow'st: ownest
brag: show off sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a2/Shakespeare.jpg/468px-Shakespeare.jpg
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7kzXdZhz5YI/TGMJaY01CmI/AAAAAAAAGdI/dUkgXAMM2BY/s1600/shakespeares-sonnets.jpg Shakespeare and his Sonnets – Presentation by Tilman Masur – Handout quatrain (4) abab
quatrain (4) cdcd
quatrain (4) efef
couplet (2) gg
= 14 lines Compilation of Sonnets published 1609
154 Sonnets
3 parts Shakespeare's Themes love:
to a man
to the "Dark Lady"
woman to a man
religion Characteristics Structure & Rhyme Scheme Meter Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
temperate: moderate, gentle
bud: blossom, flower
lease: duration

dimm'd: darkened
fair: beautiful
untrimm'd: unmodified, not stabelized

ow'st: ownest
brag: show off iambic pentameter:

either * / * / * / * / * / (strong)
or * / * / * / * / * / * (weak) Meter Sonnet 18
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