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Learning Styles

Group2: Assessment 2A
by

Christos Patsouras

on 11 December 2016

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Transcript of Learning Styles

Learning Styles
AUDITORY
VERBAL
KINESTHETIC
SOCIAL
COMMON LEARNING STYLES
VISUAL
ADULTS
EDUCATION
ONLINE
CHILDREN VISUAL
Children who are visual learners see the world in pictures and often have vivid imaginations. They need to observe a person's body language and expressions to correctly interpret information. They thrive with brightly coloured visual material, such as pin boards, flash cards, graphs and pictures (Jones, 2016).


CHILDREN VERBAL
Verbalism begins from as early as birth. Babies are aware of familiar voices in their surroundings and react to speech giving "coos and goos" when cheerful. Their cries differentiate to distinguish situations. There's a cry to say, "I'm hungry" and another that says, "I have pains" (Bowen, 1998).


CHILDREN AUDITORY
In the early stages of their development, children learn a language by hearing their parents and others around them speak to them. Activities where children are listening to their parents read books or sing nursery rhymes to them, help children develop the basics of their language (Goldberg, 2014).



CHILDREN KINESTHETIC
Kinesthetic children learn best by playing, touching, feeling, moving and exploring their environment. Using their hands and body is most beneficial to their learning and memory. For example, keeping active like catching a ball, or using skipping rope while trying to learn timetables or spelling words (Lipoff, 2011).


CHILDREN SOCIAL
Children learn many characteristics through viewing the way those around them behave, theorizes Albert Bandura. These include sharing, aggression and co-operation. They imitate many actions of those in their environment. When children socialise with others they are exposed to more words, thus improving their language (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2015).



ADULT VISUAL
Adult visual learners thrive on visual materials such as diagrams, videos and charts. All concepts and ideas must be written or demonstrated. They take copious notes despite having course notes and benefit from lists, charts and graphics. Visual learners are most effective in written communication and symbol manipulation (Smith, 2015).


ADULT VERBAL
To grow their wisdom and capacity to communicate through words with a greater audience, verbal learners are often multilingual. They commonly have good memories to handle and retain a lot of information in small time frames. They are usually fascinated with the arts, legal documents, politics, screenplay and novels (Teachnology Inc., 2012).


ADULT AUDITORY
When delivering instructions or teaching theory to adult auditory learners, it is best to include plenty of auditory stimuli. Learning environments such as work seminars and expos, where the learner can listen to the presenter and discuss the knowledge with others, helps them learn best (Vincent & Ross, 2001).




ADULT KINESTHETIC
Kinesthetic adults learn best when they can practically apply information. They have a low tolerance for sitting and listening. They need to keep actively involved through role play, practice activities, collaboration, making presentations and giving and receiving feedback. This allows them to make a connection between their learning and their goals (Post, n.d.).


ADULT SOCIAL

Social context is crucial for learning during adulthood as learning is naturally social, suggests Wilson (Hansman, n.d.). Through interacting with others, adults learn about various cultures and the world around them by being exposed to different people and learning the way different people live their lives.

ONLINE VISUAL
Learning online is an excellent environment for visual learners due to the enormous amount of visual material available. They prefer to work individually in quiet environments, utilising visually presented information in the form of readable texts, videos, images, charts and other graphics such as PowerPoint presentations (University of Illinois, 2015).


ONLINE VERBAL
Individuals who thrive through verbal learning are exposed to resources which include online libraries and encyclopedias, group activities such as Skype conferencing and e-learning university courses. These language and word based methods are paramount to enhance their learning and collaboration is beneficial to them when forming an understanding of new ideas (Caraway, 2015).


ONLINE AUDITORY
Online learning material that incorporates methods such as listening to recordings like podcasts, participating in video conferences and online discussion forums are best for the auditory learner as they need to be able to hear the information and also repeat it in discussion in order to retain it (Gilman, 2010).



ONLINE KINESTHETIC
Kinesthetic learners prefer to learn by being actively involved through practical application. Online, this means they like to click the mouse, use moving functions like drag and drop, take notes, use the latest technology to create presentations, collaborate, effectively communicate and complete other activities (Online Learning News, 2001).



ONLINE SOCIAL
Social online tools include discussion boards, group wikis and social media (Swinburne Online, 2015). People are able to gain knowledge by integrating information they receive through these tools and ideas put forward by those online into their own ideas, allowing them to build on their own concepts.



EDUCATION VISUAL
Visual learners in educational environments will physically position themselves to see the presenter and visual materials without distractions or blockages to their view, such as people’s heads. They prefer visual stimuli but will also take their own extensive notes regardless of handouts or other presentation resources (Smith, 2015).


EDUCATION VERBAL
Verbal learners thrive in an atmosphere centred on both written and spoken course material (Felder & Solomon, 1993). Some effective learning techniques include reading key notes aloud in a dramatic voice or to a catchy song/jingle, using acronym mnemonics for memorizing information and using recorded scripting of their content for repetition (Advanogy.com, 2016).


EDUCATION AUDITORY
Learning activities that involve listening to and discussing information are best for students who are auditory learners. Group discussions, brainstorming sessions and lectures are most beneficial to these types of students as they tend to respond to information that is heard or spoken (Vark, 2016).



EDUCATION KINESTHETIC
Kinesthetic learning is more readily being incorporated as a teaching tool at all levels of education. Study has recognised the benefit in developing social and communication skills by giving students opportunities to have more interactive experiences other than the traditional lecture style of learning (Mobley & Fisher, 2014).




EDUCATION SOCIAL
Working in teams in educational settings is a tool that is seen as extremely vital. It allows people to both share and discover new information. For young children it gives them an opportunity to learn team work and social protocols when interacting with others (Fellows & Oakley, 2014).



LET'S LEARN MORE
HAPPY LEARNING
HOW DO CHILDREN RESPOND TO THESE LEARNING STYLES?
HOW DO THESE APPLY WHEN LEARNING ONLINE?
HOW DO ADULTS RESPOND TO THESE LEARNING STYLES?
HOW DO THESE LEARNING STYLES APPLY TO EDUCATION?
LET'S LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE STYLES BY APPLYING THEM TO THE FOLLOWING FOUR SITUATIONS AND GROUPS
CHILDREN
Authors:
Sara Faraday
Sophia Kamenos
Christos Patsouras
Ettie Smith
Marina Strigas
WHAT ARE LEARNING STYLES?
Learning styles relates to the theory that individuals think and learn best in diverse ways (Dobolyi, Hughes, & Willingham, 2015).
Learn most effectively when they see images, graphs, videos or demonstrations (Smith & Dalton,2005). 
Learn best by listening to information or reading information out loud (VARK, 2016).
Learn by obtaining and recalling material that uses words and language to express its message (Papa, n.d.).
Learn through active movements and the practical and physical application of theory (Burd & Buchanan, 2004).
Occurs when people learn by observing others and then replicate those behaviours and values (Chegg, n.d.).
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Individuals are usually predominant in a particular learning style or a combination of learning styles (Burd & Buchanan, 2004). Metacognition asks people to think about the way they think (Livingston 1997). Being aware of their learning style preference will help individuals identify what actions they need to put in place to get the most out of their learning.

In addition, this will help facilitators tailor programs to best meet their students’ needs which helps build successful relationships and outcomes for both students and facilitators.

Being aware of visual, auditory, verbal, kinesthetic and social learning styles, shows us that we all learn differently and need to know what activities will help us learn best.

References Page 1
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Papa, J. (n.d.).
Verbal Communication Facts.
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Post, H. W. (n.d.).
Teaching Adults: What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles
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Smith, B. (n.d.).
Adult Learning Styles,
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References Page 2
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