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Untitled Prezi

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Hunter McMullen

on 23 April 2013

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Map/ Location Dogon Tribe
By: Hunter McMullen Population 400,000- 800,000
(Almost all people live in Mali or in Niger)

The population is slowly going up and down as the
years go on. The population will go up 3% one year and go down 5% the next year. So it varies yearly.

It can be hard to find the population of certain tribes because they don't have any way of citizenship.

The number of people in the tribe tells you that this is a very stable tribe, they have consistent numbers. Cultural Tradition - Animist religion- they believe in one spirit called Nommo, every night after meals they praise Nommo in the form of singing songs

- Tribe leader is called a Hogon, chosen from the elder men and once selected he cannot bathe or shave for 6 months Language Dogon is considered the one and only main language for the tribe. But, there are five different dialects, the main one is called tombo.

The official language of Mali is french. The tribe speaks very little french and they intend to keep it that way. Because they want to keep their own language. Rite of Passage Definition- A rite of passage is an event or time that takes place that signifies a younger person becoming an adult

Dama is called the rite of passage for young Dogon adults. What happens is the night before the Hogon (leader of tribe) goes out into the desert and makes a smooth path in the sand. He then writes the name of the person who is being promoted into an adult. The young adult becomes an adult if a fox walks across their name or path. The Dogon believe the fox to be an honest and trustworthy animal, so they respect where the fox walks. Mainly found in Mali which is in
North- Western Africa

This land has a positive effect on the
tribe because they are in good farm land.
The Dogon live very close to rivers and streams.
The location also has a huge impact for the tribe's animals so they can get water. myafricanmask.com egyptsearch.com stmaryislington.org exodus-codes.com teachersdomain.org Current Issues One of the biggest issues the Dogon tribe is facing is the language barrier between them and society. Although, they have had the same language for many years, it's more of a problem now then it ever was. Fewer and fewer people outside the tribe are learning to speak the language and it's going to affect the tribe in a big way. One way the tribe has tried to solve this is making their younger generations learn French, but it has been unsuccessful. whgbetc.com Body Art Dogon men don't wear any body piercings because it is looked at as being feminine. Women however only wear earrings and some wear lip rings to show wealth. Even though the tribe doesn't do a lot of piercing they do lots of body art to symbolize their religion. They also wear masks to dances and celebrations to show well being/ health. mediastorehouse.com egyptsearch.com egyptsearch.com Sources "Dogon and Sirius." - The Skeptic's Dictionary. N.p. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

"The Dogon, the Nommos and the Mystery of Sirius B." The Dogon, the Nommos and the Mystery of Sirius B. N.p. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

"The Religion of the Dogon." Religion of the Dogon. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.
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