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The Clod and the Pebble

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Deimos Zhurba

on 18 March 2014

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Transcript of The Clod and the Pebble

The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"Love seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell's despair."

So sung a little Clod of Clay
Trodden with the cattle's feet,
But a Pebble of the brook
Warbled out these metres meet:

"Love seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another's loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven's despite."
The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"Love seeketh not itself to
please
,
Nor for itself hath any
care
,
But for another gives its
ease
,
And builds a
Heaven
in Hell's despair."

So sung a little Clod of Clay
Trodden with the cattle's feet,
But a Pebble of the brook
Warbled out these metres meet:

"Love seeketh only self to please,
To
bind
another to its delight,
Joys in another's
loss
of ease,
And builds a
Hell
in Heaven's
despite
."
The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"Love seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell's despair."

So sung a
little

Clod of Clay
Trodden

with the cattle's feet
,
But a Pebble of the
brook
Warbled out these metres meet:

"Love seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another's loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven's despite."
- Pleasurable words in beginning
- The feelings anyone would want to strive for
- Provides a happy introduction to the poem

- Words that orbit around discomfort
- Provides a complete contradiction to the first stanza
- Forces the reader out of their comfort, having them associate these feelings to a greater meaning
Orange:
Kinesthetic (Touch)
Green:
Visual (Sight)
Blue:
Auditory (Sound)
Imagery
Word Choice
The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"Love
s
eeketh not it
s
elf to plea
s
e,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And build
s
a
H
eaven in
H
ell'
s
de
s
pair."

S
o
s
ung a little
C
lod of
C
lay
T
rodden with the ca
tt
le's fee
t
,
B
ut a Pe
bb
le of the
b
rook
Warbled out these
m
etres
m
eet:

"Love
s
eeketh only
s
elf to please,
T
o bind another to i
t
s deligh
t
,
Joy
s
in another'
s
lo
ss
of ea
s
e,
And build
s
a
H
ell in
H
eaven'
s
de
s
pite."
Sound
(a)
(b)
(a)
(b)

(c)
(d)
(e)
(d)

(a)
(f)
(a)
(f)
Alliteration
/
Consonance
- Consistent flow is present
- Allows a smooth and unique way to start and end the song
- Provides a way to transition between stanzas

Rhyme Scheme
- Pattern in the song is present, improving the flow of words
- Quatrain type of stanza


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)

(9)
(10)
(11)
(12)

Mostly follows Iambic Tetrameter

eg:

U / | u / | u / | u / |
Love see keth not itself to please,
U / | U / | u / | u / |
Nor for itself hath an y care,

However this meter tends to be broken by the existence of 9 syllable lines (eg. line 4)

- Further increases the flow of words in the poem


Structure
The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"
Love
seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell's despair."

So
sung
a little Clod of
Clay
Trodden with the cattle's feet,
But a
Pebble
of the brook
Warbled
out these metres meet:

"
Love
seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another's loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven's despite."
Personification && Theme
Personification
/
Target

Clay/Pebble
- Allows the audience to connect to these elements as if they were other human beings.
- Allows their statements to have a significant impact on the reader due to such connection
- Has the reader reflect on them selves, having them question which type of element/person they are

Love
- Is personified through multiple sentences rather then a single/few words.
- Is given different characteristics
Conflict

- The perspective one has of love
- Relationship between selflessness and selfishness
- Displaying the extremes of the two sides and how one achieves them.

- Has the reader reflect on their view on love, seeing if they are classified as one of them.
- Potentially provokes a change in the reader.

- Yet still displays that if anything, being selfless is a better option
- Gives happiness for both parties
Also:
The title of the poem provides us with a initial insight to the characters.

Clay/Pebble can be counted as "Stock" characters
- Gives the reader an idea what their interpretation is

Clay is soft, malleable, where these attributes are easily seen after a resent exposure to an outer force.
- The malleability can relate to selflessness
- The softness can relate to its goals/actions the clay makes when it comes to love
- The creation of such characteristics can be seen as a recent exposure to love, as such the clay is inexperienced. ("little Clod of Clay")

Pebble is hard and gains its smoothness through multiple years of exposure to outer contact (water in our case).
- Pebbles hardness can relate to the believes, hardness to the point of selfishness
- The years of exposure in becoming to what it is now can relate to the exposure to love, and how the experiences had made the pebble what it is



Peaceful Mood
- Easy going and relatively slowly paced singing
- Setting is set by a stream in a nature like environment.

Dynamic Tone
- Start out very peaceful and happy
- Ends with a bit of an intense tone as the Pebble shared its views

Connotative Words
"little Clod of Clay" && "Pebble of the brook"
- Demonstrates both the visual appeal as well as potentially their experience
- "little" inexperience
- "of the" high standing position, high experience

- Lived during the revolutionary times
- Life surrounded by a society in tough times
- eg. fall of London, American Revolution, Britain & France war
- Witnessed daily poverty

- A poet, painter and a print maker
- Wanted to bring change to the minds of the people
- His actions were not well recognized by the society

- After his passing, people eventually started to recognize his talent as a poet
- Is now highly respect, unlike he was during his life time

Blake's Poetic Work:
- Is loved due to its focus on all people
- To be understood by the majority of people
- Focus on bringing change for the better

William Blake
1757–1827
- William Blake had a unique childhood
- Very pleasant/peacefuller as he was skipping formal schooling
- Often wandered the streets as well as escaping to surrounding countryside

- Viewed the world with bright light, relative happiness
- Made unique statements
- seeing "angelic figures walking" in the fields
- seeing trees filled with angles
- Many like statements were still made even during his elderly times.

- Blake did eventually start attending a drawing school, became an apprentice to a master engraver, later joining the Royal Academy of Arts.

- After such events, he chose engraving as his main job while drawing and writing as his hobby.

About
William Blake

The Clod and the Pebble
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
"Love seeketh not itself to please,
Nor for itself hath any care,
But for another gives its ease,
And builds a Heaven in Hell's despair."

So sung a little Clod of Clay
Trodden with the cattle's feet,
But a Pebble of the brook
Warbled out these metres meet:

"Love seeketh only self to please,
To bind another to its delight,
Joys in another's loss of ease,
And builds a Hell in Heaven's despite."

Presentational Structure
- Third person
- No personal remarks are made

- Spoken by the two elements
- Two stanzas are dedicated for the song, while one gives a transition between the songs with minor descriptions of the speakers
- Poem is small in line as well as descriptions
- Yet most lines care deep detail
- Characters thoughts reflect their respective element type
- Clay states love is selfless, and string bring happiness.
- "Trodden with the cattle's feet" forces reader to question clay's statements.
- Clay is seen as a human being, and even though it went for happiness, it got stepped on by others
- Pebble is formed through many years, after supposedly saw and heard the clay, it shared its truth of love.

- Poet as though wants people to recognize love is to be nether selfish or selfless.
- It's a balance of both side
- That one destroys them selves by becoming other one of them.
- This idea is further supported through the word choices and poems progression
- Happiness, to uncertainty, to fear/unrest
Poetic Interest
- How the poet had incorporated a song in the poem, having the song transition to a normal poetic descriptions and back to the song again.
- Achieved through use of literary devices such as alliteration and consonance.

Philosophical Interest
- How the poet had struck one of the key aspects of love, making most readers question them selves.
- Achieved by providing two complete contradictory characteristics of love in the poem.

{Q1}
{Q2} && {Q3}
Best literary theory for analysis: Formalist
Full transcript