Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Arctic Cordillera

No description
by

Shaji Suganthan

on 12 November 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Arctic Cordillera

Arctic Cordillera
Soils,Vegetation, and Wildlife
Vegetation:
arctic black spruce
arctic willow
cottongrass
kobresia
moss species
wood rush
wire rush
purple saxifrage
Dryas species
sedges, Diapensia
arctic poppy
mountain avens
mountain sorrel
river beauty
moss campion
bilberry
arctic white heather
Significant geographical/historical fun facts
Mountains that pass 2km in height
the northern area is mostly covered with ice caps
glaciers are common in the southern area
the Arctic Cordillera has some of the tallest mountains
highest point is Mount Asgard
Location
The Arctic Cordillera is located in the northeast perimeter
of Nunavut and Labrador. Especially in Ellesmere and
Baffin Islands.
Population
About a thousand people live in the Arctic Cordillera, and most of the humans that live in the Arctic Cordillera are the Inuit. The major cities of the Arctic Cordillera are Pond Inlet, Clyde River, and Broughton Island(Qikiqtarjuaq).

Pond
Inlet
Clyde
River
Broughton
Island
Climate Graph
In the Arctic Cordillera it rains the most in July and it rains the least in June. The coldest month is January and March and the warmest month is July.
Bibliography
http://www.oocities.org/geography_rocks/Ecozones.htm#ArcticCordillera
http://canadianbiodiversity.mcgill.ca/english/ecozones/arcticcordillera/arcticcordillera.htm#hum
http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/paladinnx/soils.html
http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/aboutcc/problems/impacts/polar_melting/
http://www.nrdc.org/globalwarming/qthinice.asp#2
Landforms
Sedimentary rock
Moraine
Glacial erratic
U-shaped valley
Ice cap
Valley glacier
Calved ice from glacier
Raised beach
Talus slope
Granitic and metamorphic rock
Cirque glacier
Iceberg
Sea ice
Outwash fan
Horn
Arete
The Arctic Cordillera has many Landforms such as:
Outswash Fan
Arete
Climate

summer temperature matter -2 degrees
in the winter the temperatures are low as -35 degrees Celsius
most of the precipitation is snow
in the north precipitation 200mm is the average amount of precipitation
Labrador can get 600mm of precipitation each year
winter is longer than summer
Animals:
Mammals:
Muskoxen
barren-ground caribou
polar bears
the arctic wolf
arctic hare
the collared lemming
Arctic foxes
ermines
Birds:
furry-legged rock ptarmigan
gyrfalcon
snowy owl
shorebirds
seabirds
thick-billed murre
black-legged kittiwake
ruddy turnstone
red knot, black guillemot
common ringed plover
little ringed plover
northern fulmar
Songbirds
hoary redpoll
common redpoll
snow bunting,
lapland longspur
snow goose
common
king eider
red-throated loon

Since the Arctic Cordillera is really cold and dry the
soil turns into permafrost. The soil rarely defrosts.
Permaforst
The collared lemming
Arctic white heather
Issues
Global Warming:
Glacial ice and sea ice are melting and the permafrost is defrosting. The permafrost is releasing greenhouse gases. Many living things are finding it hard to adapt the increasing changes. All of wildlife in the arctic relies on sea-ice. For example Walrus are having a hard time without sea ice because they haul out sea ice floating close to land. If humans burn fossils, oil, and gas to create electricity and power vehicles.

Greenhouse gases
Mount Asgard
Glacier
Full transcript