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Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands Prezi

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Karen Kwok

on 1 June 2014

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Transcript of Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands Prezi

Climate Location and Landscape Plants and Animals Natural Resources The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands has many industries. This includes the manufacturing, forestry, service, commerce, finance, construction, agriculture, tourism, and recreation industries.
(Canadian Geographic: Mixedwood Plains 2013) Economic Activities Great Lakes Lowlands Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands Thanks for watching!
By: Karen Kwok The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands is Canada's smallest landform region and is located at the south of Ontario and Quebec. The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands are made up of 2 parts: the Great Lakes Lowlands in the west, and the St. Lawrence Lowlands in the east. A small piece of the Canadian Shield lies between these 2 lowlands, separating them (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). Both of these regions sit on top of a sedimentary bedrock which formed in the Paleozoic Era (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). Both of these regions contain fertile soil. Human Settlements Oak Ridges Moraine Niagra Escarpment Point Pelee Niagra Peninsula St. Lawrence Lowlands In the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands, there are mixed forests that contain deciduous and coniferous trees. However, there are very few of these forests left, due to human activity. Some deciduous trees include the Sugar Maple, Oak, Elm, Walnut, Beech, and Hickory. Some coniferous trees include the Eastern White Pine, Red Pine, and Cedar. A few wetlands and marshes are also located in this region (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004) In the Great Lakes Lowlands, Water Lilies and Cattails are found in wetlands and marshes. Other plants that can be found in this region are the Trillium, Dogwood, Clover, Ginseng, and Orchid. Non-native plants that can also be found include the Purple Loosestrife, Tartarian Honey Suckle, and Norway Maple (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). The Great Lakes Lowlands is located in southern Ontario. Due to glaciation, this region has a landscape that ranges from flat to rolling (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). It contains flat plains, rolling hills, and drumlin fields. The Great Lakes Lowlands is surrounded by Lake Huron, Lake Ontario, and Lake Erie. There are also many small rivers and mixed forests that contain both deciduous and coniferous trees. Soil, sand, and gravel have been deposited throughout this region from the Canadian Shield (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). The St. Lawrence Lowlands is located in southern Quebec and Ontario. This region also has a landscape that ranges from flat to rolling. The St. Lawrence Lowlands contain many flat plains and some hills. There are mixed forests that contain deciduous and coniferous trees, and many rivers, including the St. Lawrence River. Wetlands and marshes can also be found in this region. In the summer, the temperature can rise to above 20°C, and sometimes even above 30°C. In the winter, the temperature ranges from 0°C to -10°C, and can even drop below -30°C. There is 600mm to 1000mm of precipitation yearly. Sometimes, thunderstorms occur in the spring and summer (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader, 2004, p.8). References The St. Lawrence Lowlands has a continental climate. In the summer, the temperature can rise to above 20°C, and sometimes even above 30°C. Occasionally, there are severe thunderstorms and rain. In the winter, the temperature ranges from -10°C to -20°C. There are strong wing chills and about 200mm - 300mm of snowfall (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004, p.8). The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands is located in the Southeastern climate region. Both of these regions have hot, humid summers and cold, dry winters (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader, 2004, p.8). Animals that are found in this region include the White-Tailed deer, moose, coyotes, badgers, porcupines, beavers, and groundhogs. Fish that are found include the Bass, Pike, crayfish, and Walleye. Birds that are found include Blue Jays, Cardinals, loons, ducks, geese, and Baltimore Oriole. Rare and endangered species such as rattlesnakes, Barn Owls, and Greater Praire Chickens also live here (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). In the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Bulrushes, Reed Grass, and Wild Rice are found in wetlands and marshes. Grains, fruits, and vegetables are also grown in this region (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). Trillium Dogwood Purple Loosestrife Bulrush Wild Rice Fruits and Vegetables Animals that are found in this region include Red foxes, otters, weasels, Snowshoe hares, Cottontail rabbits, bats, skunks, and raccoons. Fish that are found include the Pike, crayfish, clams, scallops, Walleye, Trout, Bass and crabs. Birds that are found include geese, Herons, Gulls, ducks, and Woodpeckers. Seals, porpoises, and whales (Beluga, Fin, Blue, Humpback, and Piked) also live in this region. Rare and endangered species such as Flying Squirrels and Harbour Seals live here (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). St. Lawrence Lowlands Great Lakes Lowlands The flat land is used to build cities, transportation routes, and is also good to use as farmland (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). The fertile soil is used to grow crops. Fossil fuels are burned to make fuel. Salt is made into table salt, or used to melt ice on roads. Gypsum is used to make fertilizers. Limestone is used to make buildings. Sand and gravel are used to make asphalt (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). The renewable sources found in the St. Lawrence Lowlands include the land, soil, water, forests, and fish. Non-renewable sources found here include minerals (asbestos, limestone, sandstone, sand, and gravel) (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). The flat land is used to build cities, transportation routes, and is good for farming (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). This landscape also attracts tourists. The soil is used to grow crops. The water is used to generate electricity, and used as transportation routes. Forests are cut down to make furniture, and paper. Some trees are also tapped to collect sap. Asbestos is used to fireproof objects. Limestone and sandstone are used to make stone blocks. Sand and gravel are used to make concrete and roads (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader). The renewable sources found in the Great Lakes Lowlands include the land, soil, water, trees, and fish. Non-renewable sources found here include fossil fuels (coal, oil, and gas), and minerals (salt, gypsum, limestone, and quarry rock) (Andrew, Griffin, and Mader 2004). Coal Salt Gypsum Asbestos Limestone Some of the jobs in this region include banking, construction work, and farming. However, most of the jobs in this region are related to manufacturing. There are also many hydro, thermal, and nuclear generating plants in this region (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006). There are many people who work in these plants. The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands is the location of Canada's largest city, Toronto. The second largest city, Montréal, is also located here. Other cities include Canada's national capital, Ottawa; and Quebec's provincial capital, Quebec City (Canada Keep Exploring: Central Canada 2013). Smaller cities such as Windsor, London, and Hamilton are also located here. The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Lowlands is the most populated region in Canada. About 50% of Canada's population lives here. (Clark, Wallace, and Earle 2006, p.137) Toronto, Ontario Montréal, Quebec Ottawa, Ontario Windsor, Ontario Clark, B. et al. (2006). Making Connections: Canada's Geography. Ontario: Pearson Education Canada Inc. Andrew, W. et al. (2004). The Great Lakes Lowlands. Ontario: Nelson, a division of Thomas Canada Limited. Andrew, W. et al. (2004). The St. Lawrence Lowlands. Ontario: Nelson, a division of Thomas Canada Limited. Mixedwood Plains. (2013). In Canadian Geographic. Retrieved from http://magazine.canadiangeographic.ca Central Canada. (2013). In Canada Keep Exploring. Retrieved from http://caen.canada.travel/
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