Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Paragraph Structure: AXES (with Swofford Sample)

No description
by

Jessica Dobson

on 12 March 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Paragraph Structure: AXES (with Swofford Sample)

Paragraph Structure: AXES
Definition:
The assertion (topic sentence) states the specific arguable point you will examine in the paragraph
AXES
Assertion
eXample
Explanation
Significance
Questions to consider when examining your assertion:
Does it make a claim that requires something to be proven or explained?
Is it specific and on topic for the entire paragraph?
Does it support the thesis?
Sample
Swofford starts with the romantic expectations of war, but quickly changes to describing the hardships and reality of what it means to be a soldier, both physically and emotionally.
eXample
Definition:
Evidence that supports (proves) your assertion. This can be a direct quote from the text, a detailed description of a visual object, data, etc.
Assertion
Questions to consider when examining your example:
Does the example support the assertion?
Is the example set-up?
At the start, he seems to be eager to fight, saying, “The word up and down the columns is that soon we too will fight, that ahead of us two or three klicks we’ll encounter firmly entrenched infantry and finally get ours with rifles red-glaring and bayonets fixed for death” (Swofford 40).
Sample
Explanation
Definition:
Examples do not speak for themselves! You need to explain how they connect and prove your assertion. Then, how it proves your main claim (thesis).
Questions to consider when examining your explanation:
Is there analysis and explanation of the quote?
Does it connect the quote to the topic sentence and explain why the quote is important?
For instance, in textual analysis, an explanation of a quote pull outs particular words, images, references, etc from the example and shows how these support the assertion.

Explanation of examples and data outline the reasoning that logically links the evidence to the assertion.
This sentence describes an eagerness to contribute, to accomplish a patriotic duty. The phrase “finally get ours” implies an entitlement to fight––an expectation. This eagerness quickly changes as the essay continues to depicting the grim realization.
Sample
Significance
Definition:
This is the moment in the paragraph in which you state to the reader why this assertion matters to the bigger picture (the claim). Connect it back to your thesis.
Questions to consider when examining your significance:
Is there a connection back to the main claim (thesis)?
Is the "So What" question answered?
Full Paragraph
Thesis: He illustrates how his view changed once he realized that the romantic view of heroism had no connection to the grim reality of death one faces during war.

Swofford starts with the romantic expectations of war, but quickly changes to describing the hardships and reality of what it means to be a soldier, both physically and emotionally. At the start, he seems to be eager to fight, saying, “The word up and down the columns is that soon we too will fight, that ahead of us two or three klicks we’ll encounter firmly entrenched infantry and finally get ours with rifles red-glaring and bayonets fixed for death” (Swofford 40). This sentence describes an eagerness to contribute, to accomplish a patriotic duty. The phrase “finally get ours” implies an entitlement to fight––an expectation. This eagerness quickly changes as the essay continues to depicting the grim realization. He writes, “I’ve never seen such destruction. The scene is too real not to be real” (40). It is as if his worst nightmare has become reality. There is no pinching himself to wake up or clicking his boots three times to return back home. There are miles of sand, dead bodies almost everywhere, and the blazing rays from the sun are shining down; meanwhile, the sense of weight, an unshakable weight, has latched itself onto these young men’s backs. Swofford describes this weight as a burden: “Our rucks are heavy with equipment and ammunition but even heavier with the burdens of history, and each step we take, the burden increases” (40). This history he refers to has no awarding accomplishments. There is only a total number of all the lives lost.
Source: Thurgood Marshall College, UCSD http://marshall.ucsd.edu/doc/doc2/AXESMethodParagraphDevelopment.pdf
Full transcript