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Sentences

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by

amanda heins

on 26 September 2014

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Transcript of Sentences

Sentences
The parts of a sentence

The ways to combine those parts

Common Errors

Sentence Type 1:
Simple Sentence
Simple Sentences (S) have one independent clause with a subject and verb, either of which can be compound.
Sentence Type 2:
Compound Sentence
Compound Sentences (CP) consist of at least two independent clauses connected with a semicolon or a comma plus a coordinating conjunction.
Sentence Type 4:
Compound-Complex
Compound-Complex Sentences have two or more independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.
Independent Clause
An independent clause is a group of words that contains a subject (underlined once) and verb (underlined twice) and expresses a complete thought.

An independent clause is a sentence.

Example: Jim studied for his chemistry quiz. (IC)
Dependent Clause
A dependent clause is a group of words that contains a subject (underlined once) and verb (underlined twice) but does not express a complete thought.

A dependent clause cannot be a sentence.

Example: When Jim studied for his chemistry quiz . . . (DC) (What happened when he studied? The thought is incomplete.)
Sentence Type 3: Complex
Complex Sentence (CX) have one independent clause and at least one dependent clause
Dependent Clause
Markers
after, although, as, as if, because, before, even if, even though, if, in order to, since, though, unless, until,
whatever, when, whenever, whether, while, that, which, what, who, whoever, whom, whomever and whose.
Although I lost my passport, I did not worry about it; I continued to enjoy my vacation.

Having gone shopping, he brought me the groceries and I was able to cook.

Once I got to the checkout, I realized I had forgotten my wallet, so I didn't buy either of them.
Although I lost my passport, I did not worry about it.

When he goes shopping, he always likes to buy something that isn't on the list.

Not knowing if you wanted the red one or the blue one, I bought both.
I lost my passport, but I did not worry about it.

He is going shopping; he promised he would buy me a present.

I didn't know if you wanted the red one and I didn't know if you wanted the blue one.
I lost my passport.

He is going shopping

I didn't know if you wanted the red one or the blue one.
Sentence Errors
A fragment is when a dependent clause is left by itself as a sentence.

A run-on is when two or more independent clauses are joined incorrectly.
Examples
After we thought about it

Because he could not get away

He knew what he wanted, he decided to get it.

They knew what it was like being new could be hard.
Misplaced Modifiers
Full transcript