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EXploring Modern Texts Revision

2012
by

Paul Hanson

on 22 May 2016

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Transcript of EXploring Modern Texts Revision

Exploring Modern Texts Exam
Bring two black pens.
Pre-exam lunch (canteen at 8.45 am)
Higher? Or, Foundation?
Exam starts at 9.15am.
Exploring Modern Texts Exam
Ninety minute exam
Section A: short stories
Section B: 'Of Mice and Men'
Forty-five minutes on each.
The First Few Minutes
Spend the first minute or two just checking you have: the exam paper; a copy of 'Of Mice and Men'; a copy of 'Sunlight on the Grass'.
Read the paper; pick one question on the
short stories
and find the
'OMAM'
question.
Ignore every other question!
Section A: Anthology Short Stories
Two questions to choose from; read them and then
pick one
.
Each question has
two parts
;
answer both
.
Part A names the story and the task.
Part B names the task but you have to choose the story.
What will the questions be on?
Ideas, themes and issues
Presentation of character
Settings
More Specific?
You might be asked to write about:
the importance of or a sense of place
how Anil or Sandra or another character is presented
how threat/missed opportunities/memories/ relationships are presented
How to Plan
Spend five minutes planning each part (A&B).
Look for quotations you can write analytically (not descriptively) about.
Come up with three paragraph's worth.
Model Plan
Getting the Marks
Respond to the task
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/settings
Write using effective and secure English
Exemplar Response
Lively presents Sandra as very self-conscious of her developing womanhood: '"Like bees round the honeypot, they’ll be." The girl blushed.' Sandra blushes because Mrs Rutter says all the boys will fancy her because she's pretty. This is a simile.
Better Exemplar
Sandra
Physically mature but not mentally
Self-conscious
Changing fears
Sandra
Physically but not mentally mature
Changing fears
Self-conscious
'"Like bees round the honeypot, they’ll be." The girl blushed.'
'She touched, secretly, the soft skin of her thigh'
'She couldn’t think of anything to say. He had grown; he had got older and larger.'
'Mind your pretty skirt, pull it up a bit, there’s
only me to see if you’re showing a bit of bum.'
Quotation?
Quotation?
What's good?
clear point
good quotation
identifies a language method
What's not?
too descriptive, not analytical
no evaluation of effects
no comment on the ideas or themes
Lively presents Sandra as very self-conscious of her developing womanhood
: '"
Like bees round the honeypot, they’ll be." The girl blushed.
' The
image
of the '
honeypot
',
sweet and fragrant, with boys swarming around with interest is both attractive and uncomfortable to Sandra
. Sandra’s blushing informs the reader that she was both unprepared for the comment and unable to control her reaction; her body betrays her.
Already self-conscious about her body, as we saw at the start of the story
(‘
She looked down at her own legs, the girl, bare brown legs brushing through the grass
’),
Mrs Rutter makes this all the more discomforting, as the comment comes from an old lady she's never met before. The unwanted 'flattery' causes Sandra to become aware of her body:
'
She touched, secretly, the soft skin of her thigh
'. The
sibilance

here reflects the sound of her fingers gliding over her skin, an intimate sound and feeling only she and the reader are aware of.
It seems to me that the writer has two purposes here: firstly, she wants the reader to realise that the story is about growing up and self-discovery; secondly, she uses Mrs Rutter's comments to suggest to the reader that there is something a little odd, something dark and uncomfortable about Mrs Rutter.
What's better?
analysis and evaluation of methods and effects
comments on the ideas and themes
interpretations are sophisticated and imaginative
How to Analyse
'"Like bees round the honeypot, they’ll be." The girl blushed.'
You Try
You Try
Now, hitting all the AOs below, you have six minutes to write your most analytical paragraph on the presentation of Sandra not being quite as grown up as she thinks she is.
Peer Assessment
Swap with your shoulder partner. As you read through, underline where you think they hit one of the criteria. Two stars and a target at the end.
Respond to the task
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/settings
Write using effective and secure English
Selecting Stories; Finding Evidence
Which stories would you pick for the following?
Threat/danger?
Presentation of children?
Deceptive appearances?
A sense of place?
Doing the right thing?
The Exam Paper
Discuss both parts A and B with your partner. What would you choose and what evidence would you use?

(NB: if there's time later, parts A and B could be attempted in full)
Let's stay with the exam paper for a moment but scroll down to Section B. What do you notice about what it wants you to do?
Before we tackle this question...
Understanding the Questions
The Exam Question
Here is an explanation/description of the evidence. It's not bad but it's not going to secure a C grade:
Sandra's embarrassed.
The boys will fancy her.
How to Analyse
'"Like bees round the honeypot, they’ll be." The girl blushed.'
This is much better because it analyses perceptively:
Her body betrays her embarrassment.
The boys will be buzzing with excitement.
A concentration of everything sweet and sensual that boys find attractive.
Emphasises her youth, beauty and innocence.
Overtly sexual?
Inappropriate?
Pestering? Or, pleasurable?
Mrs Rutter's discomforting effect.
With your shoulder partner, analyse the follow quotations (they are on your handout, with space to annotate) the way I did. The point is 'Sandra is physically mature but not yet mentally.
Try not to simply explain or describe:
'Mind your pretty skirt, pull it up a bit, there’s only me to see if you’re showing a bit of bum.'
'She couldn’t think of anything to say. He had grown; he had got older and larger.'
Once you think you're done, compare yours with the pair opposite you.
Respond to the task
Respond to the text
Analysis specific detail
Evaluate the writer’s uses of language and/or structure to create effects on readers
Explore ideas/themes/settings
Make links between the stories
Selecting Stories; Finding Evidence
Now, find evidence for each of the following:
threat
in 'Anil' and 'Compass and Torch'
doing the right thing
in 'One Beautiful April...' and 'TDOT'
a
sense of place
in 'WTWD' and 'SO,SN'
symbolism
in 'MPTT' and 'TDOT'
Section B: 'Of Mice and Men'
(a) How do the details in this passage add to your understanding of George and his relationship with Lennie?
and then Part (b)
(b) How does Steinbeck use their relationship in the novel as a whole to convey ideas about America in the 1930s?
Respond to the text.
Analyse detail.
Evaluate Steinbeck's uses of language and/or structure and their effects on readers.
Respond to the ideas/themes/settings presented.
Respond to context.
Analyse detail to support response to context.
Part A:
Analyse details which present George and Lennie's relationship.
Examine this section and the rest of the book.
Evaluate the effects on the reader.
Part B:
Explore the way the lives of migrant farmers and the attitudes towards women in 1930s America are presented.
Analyse the methods and details used to present these.
... here's the mock question, which came with an extract from the start of Ch. Six:
(a) How do the details in this passage add to your understanding of Crooks?
(b) How does Steinbeck use the character of Crooks in the novel as a whole to convey ideas about America in the 1930s?
Part A
(a) How do the details in this passage add to your understanding of Crooks?
What do these details tell the reader about Crooks?
'And he had books, too; a tattered dictionary and a
mauled copy of the California civil code for 1905.'
Discuss this with your shoulder partner.
Analysis
'And he had books, too; a tattered dictionary and a
mauled copy of the California civil code for 1905.'
Part B: Context
Steinbeck’s presentation of Crooks is that of an angry, lonely individual frustrated with the discrimination he faces on the ranch. Consider these two quotations from different points in the novella. In chapter 3, Steinbeck writes that, ‘the door [to the bunkhouse] opened quietly and the stable buck put in his head.’ Steinbeck has Crooks well aware that the bunkhouse is off limits to him, so he opens the door ‘quietly’ and puts only his ‘head’ in, clearly demonstrating that he feels as though he is intruding in a place where he is unwelcome and is wary enough not to make too much noise or go barging in. As a result he attempts to exercise some control over his own space by stating to Lennie, as he tries to enter Crooks’ room, that “’You got no right coming into my room. This here’s my room. Nobody got any right in here but me”’. Being black during this period in America leaves Crooks feeling quite powerless and so he feels quite protective of anywhere or anything that he feels he can control. By refusing entry to his room, Crooks is sending out a message that he feels offended and frustrated by their discrimination of him. Furthermore, I think that Steinbeck is using Crooks and the maltreatment of him, to highlight what he sees as the injustice and cruelty that black people continued to suffer during the America of that period.
Exemplar Two
Practice Question
Let's return to the original question.
Your Turn
Peer Assessment
Below are the AOs. Follow the same process as before, completing with two stars and a target.
Contextual Factors
Steinbeck explores a range of contextual in the novella, including:
the lives of migrant farmers
attitudes towards women, race, age and disability
the fallacy of the 'American Dream'
Any one of these could appear in the exam but they probably won't be named; you'll have to work it out.
Crooks has no one to talk to.
Emphasises how much he reads because of its condition.
Being black in a white area leaves him lonely.
Crooks wants to know his rights.
Crooks receives little pleasure from his books.
The repetition of the 't' phoneme adds an angry harsh tone.
Racist attitudes. Is Steinbeck racist?
Crooks is often angry and frustrated by the cruel way he is treated.
Metaphorical verb: wild, animalistic and violent.
Suggests he's often treated unfairly/discriminated against.
Thirty years out-of-date.
Racism in America.
No use.
Powerless situation.
(b) How does Steinbeck use the character of Crooks in the novel as a whole to convey
ideas about America in the 1930s?
Examine the response on the next slide; it is also on your handout, marked 'Exemplar Two'.
Now, prepare and write:
the first paragraph of Part A
the first paragraph of Part B
Finally...
Your writing skills count in this paper.
Get a good night's sleep.
Be in the canteen at 8.45am for the pre-exam breakfast.
Good luck!
:-D
'Writer's methods' might include:
figurative lang. (metaphors, similes, personification, pathetic fallacy et cetera)
sound patterning (alliteration, rhyme, sibilance, assonance et cetera)
metaphorical verbs
detail (adjectives, adverbs et cetera)
symbolism
imagery
antithesis (contrast of opposites)
foreshadowing
colloquial language (slang, idioms et cetera)
Context: Curley's Wife
Part A: how does Steinbeck use detail to make the reader think about the death of Curley’s wife?

Part B: how does Steinbeck use Curley’s wife to express attitudes in 1930s America?

Next, take turns, starting with Bs, underlining the most important details, explaining to your shoulder partner why you're selecting it.
Rally Coaching
Respond to the text.
Analyse detail.
Evaluate Steinbeck's uses of language and/or structure and their effects on readers.
Respond to the ideas/themes/settings presented.
Respond to context.
Analyse detail to support response to context.
(A) Write about the presentation of children in 'The Darkness Out There'.

(B) Write about the presentation of children in another story from the Anthology.
Next, as the exemplar response is read, underline where you think it hits the following AOs.
Now, more fully answer the second part of the task. Part B: how does Steinbeck use Curley’s wife to express attitudes in 1930s America?

NB: there are some clues in the envelope on your desk but you cannot have a look for two minutes while you try to come up with some ideas yourself.
Your Turn
First you and then your partner, review how many of the AOs you've hit. Peer's don't forget to leave two stars and a target.
Self and Peer Assessment
Starter
What is meant by 'writer's methods'? With your shoulder partner, list as many methods as you can.
Literature Exams
23rd May: Exploring Modern Texts:
Section A: 'Sunlight On The Grass'
Section B: 'Of Mice And Men'
27th May: Poetry Across Time:
Section A: 'Moon On The Tides'
Section B: the unseen poem
'Compass and Torch'
Compass and Torch
The son idolises his father.
The father fears he's losing his son.
The son desperately wants the trip to go well.
The Mock Exam
Most people: be at the gym entrance before the end of break.

Access arrangements: be ready to enter A28 and A29 at the end of break.
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