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Mary Maverick

Travis is scared of me......!!!!!HEY KAMAIH VONSHEA RAYVONIA AND KEENA
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Trent F

on 3 November 2012

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Transcript of Mary Maverick

Mary Ann Adams Maverick (March 16, 1818-February 24, 1898), was an early Texas pioneer and author of memoirs which form an important source of information on daily life in and around San Antonio during the Republic of Texas through Civil War periods MARY MAVERICK Throughout her life, Mary had kept diaries of her experiences. In 1895, with the help of her son George Madison Maverick, she published these as her memoirs Mary Ann Adams was born in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama to William Lewis Adams, a lawyer, and Agatha Strother (Lewis) Adams. Her maternal grandmother was a cousin of James Madison, Her maternal grandmother was a cousin of James Madison, while her father's family had founded Lynchburg, Virginia. Her parents lived along the James River On August 4, 1836, she married Samuel Augustus Maverick, a graduate from Yale.Throughout her life she continued keeping diaries of her experiences. After Sam's death in 1870, as San Antonio grew, Mary Maverick made efforts to see that the pioneer past was not forgotten. She was a prominent member of the San Antonio Historical Society and the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. She helped promote the annual Battle of Flowers celebration, and devoted effort to the restoration and preservation of the Alamo as an historic site. Her watercolor sketch of the Alamo, completed during her first residence in San Antonio, is one of the earliest known depictions after the battle. Although she did not herself immigrate to Texas until two years after the fall of the Alamo, in 1889 she wrote a brief account of the battle based on the recollections of witnesses. She died on February 24, 1898, and is buried beside Sam at San Antonio City Cemetery No. 1. Mary Ann Adams was born in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama to William Lewis Adams, a lawyer, and Agatha Strother (Lewis) Adams. Her maternal grandmother was a cousin of James Madison, while her father's family had founded Lynchburg, Virginia. Her parents lived along the James River in Virginia, where her father exported flour and tobacco. During the War of 1812 her father left for Alabama and bought a plantation near Tuscaloosa. While purchasing supplies in Mobile, Robert Adams answered Andrew Jackson's call for volunteers to help defend New Orleans and raised a company which he led in the Battle of New Orleans. In 1816, her mother came to live permanently in Alabama as well. Maverick was often left alone, as her husband spent months traveling for business or combing the Texas wilderness on surveying missions. The Mavericks participated in the Council House Fight on March 19, 1840. She alerted her husband and brother Andrew, and, while Samuel Maverick rushed outside to chase down the Indians, Maverick and Andrew hurried outside to find the children. They discovered three of the fugitive Indians in the back yard, while their slave cook, Jinny, tried to protect the two Maverick children and her own four children by threatening the Indians with a large rock. Andrew Adams shot two of the three Indians and joined the main fight. Maverick hid her children in the house and watched the battle through the windows.This skirmish contiinued until all indians were dead or captured. In her diary, Maverick wrote that "'All [Indians] had a chance to surrender ... and every one who offered or agreed to give up was taken prisoner and protected. The citizens of San Antonio received word in February 1842 that Mexican president Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was again sending troops into Texas, which Mexico still did not recognize as a separate country. The Mavericks left some of their possessions with Mexican neighbors and joined their other Anglo neighbors in the Runaway of '42. With her brothers William and Andrew, Maverick and her immediate family travelled east, the first time Maverick had left San Antonio since her arrival. For several days, she and the children boarded with a rancher outside of Seguin while her husband and brothers returned to San Antonio to fight. On March 6, the sixth anniversary of the fall of the Alamo, Maverick received word that San Antonio had fallen to Santa Anna. She worried about her men for several days until they appeared, having turned back before reaching San Antonio. The Mavericks moved on to Gonzales, where they squatted in a house left empty when its residents had fled in the Runaway.
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