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Continental Shelf

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Josh Hare

on 14 April 2014

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Transcript of Continental Shelf

information
http://www.onr.navy.mil/focus/ocean/regions/oceanfloor2.htm
http://www.ehow.com/about_6816368_plant-animal-life-continental-shelf.html
http://teacher.scholastic.com/dirtrep/animal/sharks.htm
http://greathammerheadshark.weebly.com/special-adaptations.html
http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/2011/bularz_noah/adaptation.htm
http://www.ucd.ie/codtrace/codbio.htm
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/animal-adaptations.html
http://www.whalefacts.org/dolphin-adaptations/
http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/ecosys/ecology/ProtectedSpecies/Cetaceans/
http://www.sarkanniemi.fi/akatemiat/eng_evo.html
http://killerwhalesinthesea.wordpress.com/adaptations/
http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2008/bluske_brit/adaptation.htm
http://www.qm.qld.gov.au/microsites/biodiscovery/05human-impact/sunscreen-for-corals.html
http://books.google.com/books?id=twKLrgi_KpoC&pg=PA57&lpg=PA57&dq=crab+adaptations+continental+shelf&source=bl&ots=9EuojmIVDd&sig=QHwS73F068FDL2V_saSFjXXxEN0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Zv1KU63gDcW58gH8toAI&ved=0CD0Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=crab%20adaptations%20continental%20shelf&f=false
http://marinebio.org/species.asp?id=533
http://tolweb.org/treehouses/?treehouse_id=4881

images
http://placesbook.org/continental-shelf
http://www.onr.navy.mil/focus/ocean/regions/oceanfloor2.htm
http://images.forwallpaper.com/files/images/b/b5bf/b5bf79ea/168388/sunset-ocean-rock-beach-rocks-sand-traces-of.jpg
http://www.sharkguardian.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/hammerhead-shark1.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/Gadus_morhua_Cod-2b-Atlanterhavsparken-Norway.JPG
http://www.excelsportfishing.com/images/albacore.jpg
http://cdn.zmescience.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/sea-otters3.jpg
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rQkvR0FkPbk/TVgPUUpyDKI/AAAAAAAAAqw/pDoq6sPfI1U/s1600/Jumping_Bottlenose_Dolphins.jpg
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02027/AXYTG7_2027733b.jpg
http://topworldpost.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/ocean.jpg
http://tolweb.org/treehouses/?treehouse_id=4881
Continental shelf's place on Earth
Biotic factors
Swimming in the water
weather of the continental shelf
The climate of the continental shelf varies or wherever you are. For example, the continental shelf off of Antarctica would be extremely cold with little precipitation but the continental shelf off of Florida would warm with large amounts of precipitation.

Depending on which part of the continental shelf you are going to you should bring waterproof jackets, goggles, sunscreen and swim wear.
Abiotic factors
water
sand
rocks
sunlight
temperature
salinity
warnings for the continental shelf
threats to the continental shelf
Continental Shelf
What is a continental shelf biome?
A continental shelf is the submerged parts of continents that stretch toward the sea from low tide all the way to depths of up to 600ft.
Where is the continental shelf?
As shown below (in dark blue) the continental shelf is located around all of the continents.
works cited
In the sand or on the ground
Plants
Attractions on the continental shelf
endangered species
climate change
fish
mammals
The food chain of the continental shelf starts with plankton.
Sharks live in the continental shelf biome and have many adaptations like their streamline body shape, gills and multiple rows of sharp teeth.
Specific types of sharks like Hammerhead sharks also live in the in the continental shelf biome and have more adaptations like their hammerhead shape that lets them see 360 degrees around their body.
Tuna such as Albacore Tuna have special body and scale shapes and streamlined fins that allow them to swim quickly for long periods of time.
Cod are cold-water fish that have adapted to live in waters with temperatures as low as 2 degrees Celsius.
Mackerel have developed camouflage that allows them to be able to blend in with their environment
Dolphins that live in the continental shelf biome have many adaptations, like their flippers, their streamlined body, how their back legs got smaller and smaller until they disappeared and a layer of blubber to keep them warm.
Many whales also spend time living in the continental shelf and have many of the same adaptations like their rear legs shrinking until they went away, a layer of blubber to keep them warm, they also have flippers that developed over the bones of the 5 digits of land mammals. Specific whales have more adaptations. For example, the killer whale has developed sharp teeth to rip apart and chew their prey.
Sea otters are mammals that spend a lot of their time in the water and have many adaptations to do this like how they have web feet to swim more quickly and eyes that allow them to see very well under water.
cooperation and competition
Coral species that live in hot areas of the continental shelf have adapted by being able to produce a fluorescent pigment that protects them from UV rays of the sun.
Many species of crab live on the continental shelf some of which have become brightly colored which makes them look poisonous so fewer predators will attack them. They have also developed claws.
There are many species of lobsters that live on the continental shelf. Lobsters have developed legs to crawl and most of these species have developed claws.
Sea urchins also live on the continental shelf and have many adaptations like how they are light sensitive, which means they are able to follow shadows with their spines, and they are able to re-build their spines if they are injured.
works cited continued
information
http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/in-dead-water/page/1240.aspx
http://tikirose17375.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/seaweed-adaptations/
http://www.garf.org/trever/anem/anenome.html
https://worldwildlife.org/species/directory?direction=desc&sort=extinction_status

images
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/islands01/log/sep29/media/crab_600.jpg
http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/659/cache/energy-arkansas-oil-spill-bird_65974_600x450.jpg
http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/Global/usa/graphics/2007/9/overfishing.jpg
http://firstworldfacts.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Bluefin-Tuna.jpg
http://cdn.zmescience.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/humpback_whale.jpg
scuba diving
surfing
fishing
swimming
Looking for nearby biomes to go to?
Almost every other biome is close to the continental shelf so you could check out the grasslands, forests, rainforests, tropical forests, wetlands or really anything all on the same trip.

overfishing
human caused pollution
Many types of seaweed live in the continental shelf biome and have adaptations like an air bladder that keeps seaweed floating to avoid being buried by sediments.
A cooperation between clown fish and anemones is the clown fish receives protection from predators and gives protection from polyp-eating fish to the anemones.

One form of competition in the continental shelf biome is when multiple species are all competing for the same food supply. An example of this is how sea snails, kelp crab, abalone, and sea urchin are all trying to eat the same supply of kelp.
Yangtze Finless Porpoise
Bluefin Tuna
Blue Whale
Sei Whale
Global warming could cause the ocean levels to rise.

If something dramatic like an ice age occurred, then the ocean levels would decrease causing there to be a decrease of continental shelf habitat.
Global importance
80% of world vegetation and animal life
90% of worlds harvest fish
it is a large source of oil, natural gas, and mineral deposits
renewable wave energy
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