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Rusty Crayfish: An Invasive Species

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Hannah C

on 5 November 2012

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Transcript of Rusty Crayfish: An Invasive Species

Rusty Crayfish: An Invasive Species The Rusty Crayfish was first sighted in the Kawartha Lakes, Ontario in the late 1960's. Since then, the Rusty Crayfish has been found in other places, like: South-Central Ontario

Eastern Ontario

North-Western Ontario The Rusty Crayfish was most likely introduced to Ontario because of
aquarium releases by hobbyists

bait bucket releases by anglers

activities of commercial harvesters

teachers and students doing live studies Effects Rusty Crayfish have:

they compete with other native crayfish and fish for resources which creates disappearance of other native crayfish

they eat large amounts of aquatic vegetation (food) which reduces spawning and nursery habitat for native fish

since the female crayfish can hold her fertilized eggs under her tail, the rusty crayfish can spread quite rapidly Ways that humans have attempted to control the invasive species of the Rusty Crayfish:

Ontario now prohibits the overland transport of all species of crayfish, dead or alive.

since May 1st, 2007, it is illegal to possess crayfish (including for consumption) These attempts such as making it illegal to possess crayfish have made the rusty crayfish more under control though the rusty crayfish is still a threat to our waters. Some interesting facts about the Rusty Crayfish:

the scientific name for the rusty crayfish is "Orconectes Rusticus"

they are very aggressive and have bigger claws than other crayfish google.ca google.ca google.ca google.ca google.ca google.ca Resources:
google.ca for all images

www.invasivespecies.com

www.seagrant.umn.edu

www.gov.mb.ca

www.wild-facts.com Here's a video on Invasive Species. In this video "Frank" would be the rusty crayfish and other crayfish and fish would be "Oliver".
Full transcript