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3BastinMiddle

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by

Kaitlyn Bastin

on 25 November 2012

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Transcript of 3BastinMiddle

Dutch Reformed
Anglican
Presbyterian
Lutheran
French Huguenot
Congregational Presbyterian
Quaker
Church of England
Dutch Reformed
Baptist
Dutch Lutheran
Seven Day Baptist
German Reformed Episocopal
German Reformed
Presbyterian Scandinavian Lutherans
Dutch Reformed
English Quakers
Welsh Baptists
Church of England Fertile soil
Grains are grown
Mild climates
Called the "breadbasket" because of all the grains grown. In 1682 a Pennsylvania law was passed, requiring all children to be taught to read and write and be taught in a useful trade. The schools were characterized of different religious denominations. William Penn and Benjamin Franklin strongly enforced education in the Middle Colonies. Farmers in the middle colonies were most prosperous of all. They grew wheat, barley, oats, and corn.
The middle colonies were often called the "breadbasket" because of the wheat and such that was grown.
Most of the land in the colonies would be settled by Dutch and was known as New Netherlands and the British controlled the region.
Peter Minuit founded New York in 1626 and called it "New Amsterdam."
The original colonists were of Dutch decent.
The city and its people came under British Control in 1664.
King Charles II bestowed the lands to his younger brother, the Duke of York. The colony was renamed New York in honor of the Duke.
From 1785 to 1790, New York was the capital of the newly formed United States.
In 1638, Peter Minuit established the colony of Delaware to expand trade and profit for the Dutch colonies in the New World.
The Swedes who founded the first settlement claimed the land next.
Lord Baltimore would later claim the area of Delaware for his colony in Maryland.
It next passed from Lord Baltimore to the Duke of York when William Penn sold the land to him.
Contentions over Delaware continued until the Revolutionary war, when Delaware was given to the people who lived in the colony.
Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret founded two provinces, dubbed East and West Jersey, in 1660 for trade and profits.

The land was granted to the men by the Duke of York, who'd taken control of New Netherland (including New Amsterdam, which was renamed New York).

Quakers settled the area, calling them East and West Jersey. These two charters would later be unified into New Jersey in 1702.

The colony was the third to ratify the Constitution and the first to embrace the Bill of Rights.
William Penn, a Quaker, established the charter for Pennsylvania in 1682.

Penn was determined to establish religious freedom for his fellow Quakers in the New World.

William Penn negotiated to purchase the land from the Leni Lanape (a local Native American tribe) in order to establish peaceful relations.

Philadelphia became home to the Founding Fathers' (Link to Founding Fathers Fun Facts Article) debates for revolution and personal freedom.

Pennsylvania was the first colony to promise religious freedom and tolerance to settlers.

“I dined at a tavern with a very mixed company of different nations and religions. There were Scots, English, Dutch, Germans, and Irish. There were Roman Catholics, Church [of England] men, Presbyterian, Quakers,... Moravians,... and one Jew.” (Doctor Hamilton, 1774). Middle Colonies Kaitlyn
Bastin
3rd Hr.
11/26/12 The Middle Colonies include 4 states: Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware Climate and Soil Religious Freedoms Pennsylvania Religious
Freedoms Methodist
Baptist
Quaker
Moravian
Jewish New Jersey religious Freedoms Pennsylvania Religious
Freedoms Delaware Religious Freedoms Information on the Middle Colonies Interesting Facts New York Interesting Facts Delaware Interesting Facts New Jersey interesting Facts Pennsylvania Interesting Facts The Middle Colonies, "The Breadbasket Colonies".
By: Kaitlyn Bastin
Full transcript