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Articles of Confederation v. Constitution

Lecture on the deficiencies of the Articles of Confederation and the ways in which the Constitution fixed those deficiencies.
by

Kellye Self

on 25 January 2016

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Transcript of Articles of Confederation v. Constitution

Why the Constitution?
Ratification
Two camps:
Federalists
Anti-Federalists
Articles of Confederation
First government in the former colonies
War Debts
Shay's Rebellion
Unfair Competition
The Union was in Danger
How does the Constitution fix these deficiencies?
Sets up a federal system
Constitutional Convention 1787
Accomplishments of the Confederation Congress
Won the Revolutionary War
Gives national government the power to act upon the people
Sets up Three Branches
with separation of powers and
checks and balances.
To make the Constitution required a series of Compromises...take note of them all...
Rejected a unitary system
One branch
Equal votes per state
Laws required 9 of 13 states to pass
Amendments required unanimity
Central Congress had no power to enforce any laws passed (including taxes)
Northwest Ordinance of 1787
Limited national government TOO much
Treaty of Paris 1783
http://www.cnn.com/2011/POLITICS/07/22/debt.crisis.lessons.history/
Historians call this
"The Critical Period"

1783-1787
Provides a variety of limits on power
Federalist Papers
Anti-Federalist Writings
Full transcript