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03.06 Covalent Bonding and Lewis Structures

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by

Tyler Brown

on 2 March 2014

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Transcript of 03.06 Covalent Bonding and Lewis Structures

Ionic compounds have higher melting points than covalent bonds. Since the electrostatic attraction is higher in ionic compounds are tighter together, there is a higher production of heat, and more energy is required to break them down.
1. Which type of compound usually has higher melting points: ionic compounds or covalent compounds? What is the reason for this difference in melting points? (3 points)
03.06 Covalent Bonding and Lewis Structures
By:Tyler Brown

1.
Solids?

No, Ionic compounds do not conduct electricity in Solids.
2.
Liquids?
Yes, Ionic compounds conduct electricity in Liquids.
3.
Aqueous solutions
(when the ionic compounds are dissolved in water)?
Yes, Iconic compounds conduct electricity in Aqueous solutions.
1. Do ionic compounds conduct electricity as:
(3 points)
1.
Solids?

Yes, covalent compounds conduct electricity in solids.
2.
Liquids?
No, covalent compounds conduct electricity in liquids.
3.
Aqueous solutions
(when the covalent compounds are dissolved in water)?
No, covalent compounds conduct electricity in Aqueous solutions.
1. Do covalent compounds conduct electricity as:
(3 points)
Insert completed data tables for each part of the lab. Be sure that the data tables are organized and include units when necessary.
substanceA
: Higher than 300c

substanceB
: 200

substanceC
: Turns white at 250 but never melted.

substanceD
: 130
Melting Point
(4 points)
Substance A
: did not conduct as a solid but in liquid and aqueous it did

Substance B
: did not conduct on any of the 3

Substance C
: did not conduct as a solid, only in liquid and aqueous

Substance D
: didn’t conduct in any of them
1. Conductivity
(4 points)
For substance A and C they were ionic because it would only melt at high temperature.
For substance B and D they were covalent because the only melted at lower temperature.
1. Based on your observations in the lab, categorize each unidentified compound as ionic or covalent. Explain in one or two sentences why you categorized the compounds the way that you did. (5 points)
2. Explain, in your own words, the differences between ionic and covalent bonding that account for the differences in their melting points. (4 points)
Due to the properties of an ionic bond it melts at a higher temperature because of its strong bond, while the properties of a covalent is weak so it melt at a lower temperature.
a. Why do you think ionic compounds are not able to conduct electricity as solids, even though they can as liquids and in solution? (2 points)
Since the movement of particles in an ionic compound is minimal, they cannot conduct electricity as a solid.
b. Based on your research and observations, why do you think pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity but tap water usually does? (2 points)
Pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity because there are not as many foreign particles in distilled water it does not conduct electricity as well as tap water.
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