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Philippine Folk Dance

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Vincent Usisa

on 15 March 2016

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Transcript of Philippine Folk Dance

PHILIPPINE
FOLK DANCE

- MOVEMENT
Dance is an Artistic Movements of Expression
Dance is an art form that generally refers to:
movement of the body,
used as a form of expression,
social interaction or
presented in a spiritual or performance setting.
Our country is rich in this form of art. From all passage of life – we Dance (
from fertility to death
).
Dance
is an integral part of Filipino culture that dates back to the period before the conquerors ever stepped foot in our country.
We cannot know exactly when people began to dance, however, because dancing is an expressive movement, it could have been spontaneous.
from the
HEART
Dance was a sacred expression of praise and worship of God.
Ed Lapiz

Expression of:
JOY -
bate / wedding / victory in war

THANKSGIVING -
Festival dances (Kadayawan, Kaamulan, etc.)
WORSHIP -
Subli / Sayaw sa Obando / Pastulan / Pagdiwata
FOLK DANCE
Folk dance
is usually being performed by members of the community in which the dance is a part of their tradition and culture.
The idea of folk dance is commonly connected with the concepts of ethnicity, lower classes, rural culture, authenticity and tradition.
FOLKDANCE
Dances of the People handed down from generation to generation.
They are dances performed at social functions by people with little or no professional training, often to traditional music or music based on traditional music.
They are not designed for public performance or stage, although traditional folkdances may be later arranged and set for stage performances.
The Philippine archipelago is consists of 7,100 islands. This number of islands corresponds to more or less the number of different culture, traditions, customs, and beliefs of the Filipinos, making it a nation of diversified culture.
Philippine folkdances mirror the filipinos’ cultural beginnings and drama of everyday lives.
From paganism, christianism, religious activities, occupational dances, mimetic dances and others.
It blends the exotic customs and cultures of many countries and races that have influenced the country.
PHILIPPINE FOLK DANCE
The traditional dances of the Filipinos are vibrant and colorful, capturing the history of the archipelago.
Filipino folk dance history is not the history of a single national dance.
Regional differences are well pronounced, and are affected by geography and religion, as well as contact with outside cultures.
FUNDAMENTALS OF PHILIPPINE FOLK DANCE
Positions of the arms and feet
Waltz -
Native / Balance / Cross / Turn
Polka -
Plain / Slide / Hop / Heel & Toe
Sway Balance -
Close / Point / Raise / Brush / Hop / Waltz / Double
Change Step -
Plain / Cross
FOLK DANCE BASIC
Step
Point
Touch
Slide
Brush
Hop
Swing
Mincing (step) Shuffling (slide)
Dance Steps in 2/4 time signature
step point / step hop / slide step / bleking / touch

Dance Steps in ¾ time signature
kuradang / mazurza / redoba / step swing hop

TRADITIONAL Philippine Folkdance
CARIÑOSA
TINIKLING
SUBLI
PANDANGGO SA ILAW
SINGKIL
KAPPA-MALONG
SAKUTING
MAGLALATIK
ITIK-ITIK
PANTOMINA
KURATSA
JOTA

NATIONAL AND REGIONAL Folkdances
PANGDANGGO
JOTA
HABANERA
BALSE
POLKA
OCCUPATIONAL Folkdances
TAUTI
- catching catfish in tawi-tawi.
MANAGUETE
– visayan coconut wine tapper.
MANANAGAT

– cebuano dance that mimics fish catching and gathering.
MOLINERO

– dance depicting grain grinder/mill operator
PAMULAT ISDA
– fish drying dance of Negros.
SALA TI MAIS
– farmers pay tribute to their corn industry in Isabela.
AGALALUKAN
– clam gatherers of Subic, Zambales.
BUTI-BUTI

– Badjao (also known as sea gypsies) mimics daily activities of rowing, diving, casting, pulling the nets, harvesting and bringing home the catch.
RICE CYCLE
- the hardships from planting, harvesting, threshing, pounding and winnowing of rice.
RELIGIOUS and CEREMONIAL Folkdances
PANATAHAN
- dance in honor of the Mahal na Poong Sta. Cruz in Batangas.
KARASAGUYON
- welcoming dance of T’boli women
SAYAW SA OBANDO
– fertility rites in Obando Bulacan
BAYLUHAN
- celebrates San Pascual Baylons Feast day in Navotas, Rizal
BATE
– dance during Easter Celebration
PAGDIWATA
– ritual dance of Tagbanua, performed while healing sick people usually possessed by bad spirit
DUGSO
– Thanksgiving dance in Bukidnon
IMITATIVE Folkdances

TINIKLING • LAPAY BANTIGUE
TINOLABONG • ITI-ITIK
SALIDSID • ALITAPTAP
MANMANOK • INALIMANGO
MADAL TAHAW • PASIGIN
BLIT B’LAAN • TAREKTEK
KARAL IWAS • MARIPOSA
COMIC Folkdances
MAKONGGO
– imitates the movements and characteristics of a monkey in Sta. Maria Bulacan.
GAMBUT
- imitates the movements and characteristics of a monkey in Koronadal South Cotabato
KINOTON
– depicts the movement bitten by ants in Ilocos Sur.
PINUHAG
– dancer demonstrates how he evades the bees and how he suffers from their bites by scratching the different parts of his body, rolling, jumping and doing all sorts of antics.
COURTSHIP Dances
IMUNAN
– means jealousy in San Jacinto, Pangasinan
ARINGGINDING-GINDING
– Mindoro
MARAMION
– Cebu and Bohol
KUMAKARET
– Barrio Dorungan, Pangasinan province
LULAY –
San Pablo Laguna
PASEO DE ILOILO
– Iloilo City
SINAKIKI
- Rapu-Rapu, Albay
KOMINTANG
– Batangas City
PITIK MINGAW

DESPEDIDA
FESTIVAL DANCES in the Philippines
SINULOG
– CEBU CITY
ATI-ATIHAN
– KALIBO, AKLAN
DINAGYANG
– ILOILO
PANAGBENGA
– BAGUIO CITY
KADAYAWAN
– DAVAO CITY
MASSKARA
– BACOLOD CITY,
KAAMULAN
- BUKIDNON
KASADYAHAN
– ILOILO
AGDAMDAMILI
– ILOCOS NORTE
SUBLI
– BATANGAS

Western Influence
Displays a very strong influence from the Western countries, these dances were, nonetheless, "Filipinized".
When the Spaniards came to the Philippines in the 16th century, little did they realized that they would change the traditions of the Filipinos including their dance together with religion, government, economics, politics and society. The Spaniards brought with them their music and dance traditions that stuck so strongly, finding its way nearly all dances is labeled as “Christians”.
Filipino adaptations of European dances like the jotas, fandanggos, mazurkas, habanera, and waltzes that were danced to the stringed music of the rondalla.


CORDILLERA DANCES
Inhabiting this rugged terrain are six ethno-linguistic tribes known as the
(BIBAK) - Benguet, Ifugao, Bontoc, Apayao, Kalinga.
Meaning “knotted rope”, the Spanish term refers to the jumbled rolls and dips of this long range traversing the North part of Luzon island. Separated by high peaks and deep valleys, they develop cultural traits distinguishing each one from the other.
Despite clear differences, “regionalistic” similarity threads through all the groups lumping all, as if were in one distinct ethnic group.
The dances reflect the unique geographical conditions under which the Cordillera people live – the cool air, their rugged uneven terrain, cliffs and ravines. The cycle of life is reflected in their rites of passage.
Cordillera dances continues to be an expression of community life that animates the various rituals and ceremonies. It serves for self-edification of the performers and entertainment for the spectators and to mark milestones in the passage of life.
CORDILLERA DANCES
BUMAYAH
– most celebrated festival dances of the highlanders
TAKILING
– Kalingga victory dance
RAGSAKSAKAN
- means " Merriment". This dance would be performed after a successful headhunt and also for a peace pact between waring tribles. The colorful hand woven blankets " blankets of life" are worn around the neck while baskets to carry produce or rice are worn upon the head.
SALIP
- traditional dance from Central Kalingga
MANGAMGAYAW
– Bontoc ritual dance
PATTONG
– dance to celebrate successful headhunt from Kalingga
BANAWOL
–Ifugao festival dance honoring guest with crowns of bright plummage
MINDANAO DANCES
The ethno-linguistic groups who are primarily considered Muslim are the Maranao, Maguindanao, Samal, and Tausug.
The dances are characterized by vivid colors and rhythmic movements which reflect the influence of Arabian and Indo-Malaysian cultures.
The Mindanao archipelago in the Southern part of the Philippines is composed of 870 islands, making up the southern area of our country. In this vastness of the landscape, live about 700,000 Filipinos, who embraced Mohammedanism as early as 14th century whose customs and traditions have remained unchanged. Because of its geographical location, Filipino-Muslim constitutes the largest single non-Christian Group in the Philippines. They are known for their mysticism, royalty, splendor and beauty which are also evident in their unique music and dances.
PAKARADIAAN-Entertainment
• SINGKIL • ASIK
• PANGALAY • KINI-KINI
• KAPPA MALONG • KUNTAO
• KINAKULANGAN • TUTUP
• KATZUDURATAN • KAPAGAPIR

ETHNIC/TRIBAL DANCES
Pockets of cultural minorities live in the style of their fore bearers in the hills and mountains throughout the Philippine Archipelago, they are inhabited by non-Christian Filipino tribes whose culture and animistic beliefs predate both Islam and Christianity.
Among the Philippines 79 million people, about 5 million are collectively referred to as the Tribal group. They comprise 60 groups and sub-groups, differentiated by language and cultures that dates back to centuries. Many of the people had maintained unique lifestyle that are geographically isolated and culturally separated from the mainstream of Philippine society.
Dance for them is a basic part of life, still performed essentially "for the gods." As in most ancient cultures, their dances are nonetheless closely intertwined with ceremonials, rituals, sacrifice, and life.
TRIBAL IMAGES
MAKATOD
– Mandaya tribe
KADAL TAHU
– T’Boli Tribe
GIN-UM
– Bagobo Tribe
PANGASO
– Tagbanwa of Palawan
TIG-ANI
– Manobo Tribe
PAGIGAWAN
– Talaandig tribe
KUGLONG-SALURAY
– Matisalug tribe
BALAE
– Subanon Tribe

RURAL DANCES
Endowed by nature with rich natural resources, people had learned to a great extent to weave their lives in consonance with their natural environment. They drew strength and inspiration from their forefathers and develop a unique culture well-known in the country.
Dances from the lowland, rice growing countryside illustrate the festive and demonstrate the love for life. It expresses a joy in work, a love for music, and pleasures in the simplicities of life.
In the rural areas of the Philippines, life is comparatively simple and pleasant. In a country abundantly blessed by nature, there is much to celebrate in dance, song, and story.
TIME TO
DANCE
FOLK DANCE TO LEARN
LAPAY BANTIGUE

A mimetic dance from Bantigue, a coastal province of Masbate, that refers to lapay or sea gulls which is bountiful in Bantigue.

Graduate – Bachelor of Secondary Education major in Physical Education w/ specialization – DANCE.

Former Performing Artist and asst. Dance Director - Bayanihan Philippine National Dance Company.

Writer – 5 vol. of Bayanihan Instructional Video CD.

Former Artistic Director and Choreographer – Sining Kumintang Philippines.

Former Dance Specialist – Batangas Provincial High School for Culture and the Arts

Executive Council – National Committee on Dance – National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

MR. MANRIQUE C. CABAYA
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