Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Copy of Sources of Australian law

No description
by

David Fong

on 22 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Copy of Sources of Australian law

Sources of Australian Law
Existed prior to British settlement
Laws of England applied from 26 January1788
Native title - first considered in the Mabo case
Aboriginal Customary Law
The set of legal principles by which Australia is governed
Came into force on 1 January 1901 (Federation)
Describes how Parliament is composed and how it works
Lists powers of Parliament (including the areas in which Commonwealth Parliament can make laws)
Explains the role of the High Court
May only be changed by a referendum
All Acts of Parliament must comply with the Constitution
Download Free App"Constitution" of Australia
The Constitution
Parliament
Made by judges, inherited from UK
More recent ones are usually called 'case law' or
"Judicial precedent" - Judges must follow decisions in earlier cases in higher courts where the factual circumstances are essentially the same, some precedents are binding whilst others are only persuasive
Subject to statute law (could be overridden by parliament
Common Law
Represents the people of Australia
Makes and changes laws
"Statute law" (also known as 'legislation' or 'Act of Parliament')
Legislative power - Parliament
Executive power - Cabinet
Judicial power (Courts)
Separation of powers
Full transcript