Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

ELA/FSA Text-Based Writing

No description
by

Mr. Skocik

on 29 November 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ELA/FSA Text-Based Writing

Read the passage and find the following:
OA
CC
E
A
L
ELA/FSA Text-Based Writing
Argumentative &
Informative/Explanatory Writing

Key Points
3 Domains
Purpose, Focus, & Organization (4-point rubric)
Evidence & Elaboration (4-point rubric)
Conventions of Standard English (2-point rubric)
Domain - Purpose, Focus, & Organization
Argumentative
Strong claim*
Address opposing argument/claim*
Squash opposing argument - counterclaim*
Use transitions
Logical progression
Arg.
Key Points
Inf./Exp.
Informative/Explanatory
Strong main idea/claim*
Use transitions
Logical progression
Objective tone

Key Points
Domain - Evidence & Elaboration
Argumentative
-Provide textual support from all sources*
-Identify your source by author or title or source*
-Smoothly Integrates sources
-Academic Vocabulary
-Vary Structure

Informative/Explanatory
-Provide textual support from all sources*
-Identify your source by author or title or source*
-Smoothly Integrates sources
-Academic Vocabulary
-Vary Structure
Key Points
Domain - Conventions of Standard English
Argumentative & Informative/Explanatory

2 points - Adequate command of conventions
-some minor errors in usage but no pattern of errors
-adequate use of punc., cap., sentence formation, and spelling

1 point - Partial command of conventions
-various errors in usage
-inconsistent use of correct punc., cap., sentence formation, and spelling
Structure
Claim/Thesis
Development
Body Paragraphs
Counterclaim
Introduction
Argumentative
Informative/Explanatory
Argumentative Essay Structures
Introduction

Primary Argument
Least powerful
More powerful
Most powerful

Opposing Arg. &
Counterclaim

Conclusion
Present your points in a PEAL format.
Attempt to provide as much evidence and analysis as possible from sources.
A point lacking evidence and analysis is worthless.
2-3 para.
1 para.
1 para.
1 para.
Present your argument.
Lead - Engaging statement or anecdote
Claim - Answers Prompt
Forecast - Preview of main points (May be joined with Claim)
Link - Transitions to body
When applicable, this paragraph will start by introducing the other side of the argument (opposing arg. - Opp. Arg.) and why other people believe it is correct.
You will then prove why the other side of the argument is wrong (counterclaim - CC), and why your position is the better option.
This paragraph can follow the introduction or precede the conclusion - it is best before the conclusion.
*Other options available.
A restatement of claim and forecast in a new, exciting way
Intensified Insight/Call to Action - provides emphasis and finality
Leaves reader convinced and enthused.
Introduction

Primary Argument
Least powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC
More powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC
Most powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC

Conclusion
Present your points in a PEAL format.
Attempt to provide as much evidence and analysis as possible from sources.
A point lacking evidence and analysis is worthless.

*In this scenario, you would provide your reason for support with evidence and then, you would address the opposing argument and provide a counterclaim with evidence.
This option is most beneficial when you have more than one opposing argument that needs addressed.
2-3 para.
1 para.
1 para.
Present your argument.
Lead - Engaging statement or anecdote
Claim - Answers Prompt
Forecast - Preview of main points (May be joined with Claim)
Link - Transitions to body
A restatement of claim and forecast in a new, exciting way
Intensified Insight/Call to Action - provides emphasis and finality
Leaves reader convinced and enthused.
Conclusion
Citing Sources
Prompt
Dissection
Introduction

Body
Least powerful
More powerful
Most powerful

Conclusion
Present your points in a PEAL format.
Attempt to provide as much evidence and analysis as possible so your essay isn't simply a summary.
A point lacking evidence and analysis is worthless.
2-4 para.
1 para.
1 para.
Present your argument.
Lead - Engaging statement or anecdote
Claim/Thesis - Answers Prompt
Forecast - Preview of main points
Link - Transitions to body
A restatement of claim and forecast in a new, exciting way
Intensified Insight - provides emphasis and finality
Leaves reader informed and engaged.
Informative/Explanatory Structure
Lead
Introduction - Lead
Lead
The opening sentence(s). Could be a word, a quote, an anecdote, dialogue, statistic, cultural, literary, or historical reference.
The purpose of the lead is to get your reader interested.
Should start reader thinking in the direction of your claim (P-point).

Claim
Introduction-Claim/Thesis
Answer to the question asked, or your statement on the topic.
This is OPINION, not fact.
Claim/Thesis
Forecast
Link
Introduction-Forecast
Forecast
This can be attached to your claim/thesis.
Explains what points will follow in order for you to support your thesis.
These ideas or points will become your topic sentences (P - in PEAL) for your body paragraphs
Your paper is about convincing your reader that what you say is true.
You do this through a series of well explained points.

Introduction-Link
Link
In an introductory paragraph, the Link serves as a finishing & transition statement into the body paragraphs.

Introduction
Lead
Introduction - Lead
Lead
The opening sentence(s). Could be a word, a quote, an anecdote, dialogue, statistic, cultural, literary, or historical reference.
The purpose of the lead is to get your reader interested.
Should start reader thinking in the direction of your claim (P-point).

Claim
Introduction-Claim/Thesis
Answer to the question asked, or your statement on the topic.
This is OPINION, not fact.
Claim/Thesis
Forecast
Link
Introduction-Forecast
Forecast
This can be attached to your claim/thesis.
Explains what points will follow in order for you to support your thesis.
These ideas or points will become your topic sentences (P - in PEAL) for your body paragraphs
Your paper is about convincing your reader that what you say is true.
You do this through a series of well explained points.

Introduction-Link
Link
In an introductory paragraph, the Link serves as a finishing & transition statement into the body paragraphs.

Introduction
P
oint - Determine your point or claim

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
P

E

A

L
PEAL
P
oint - Determine your point or claim

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
P

E1

A1

E2

A2

L
PEAEAL
Addressing Opposing Claims
Every argument has two sides, and not everyone will agree with your side. To strengthen your argument, think about what your opponent might say. Then respond to each opposing claim with a counterclaim.
Claim
Counterclaim
Opposing Claim
P
oint - Determine your point or claim

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

O
pposing
A
rgument

- Present what you anticipate your opponent's argument may be

C
ounter
c
laim - Refute the opposing argument by providing a point to diminish (squash) their POV

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
P

E

A

OA

CC


E

A

L
PEA-OA/CC-EAL
Your body paragraphs should reflect your forecast from your introduction.
Each body paragraph should be ordered in the same sequence as your forecast.
Body Paragraph Points
Introduction

Primary Argument
Least powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC
More powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC
Most powerful
*Opp. Arg. & CC

Conclusion
Present your points in a PEAL format.
Attempt to provide as much evidence and analysis as possible from sources.
A point lacking evidence and analysis is worthless.

*In this scenario, you would provide your reason for support with evidence and then, you would address the opposing argument and provide a counterclaim with evidence.
This option is most beneficial when you have more than one opposing argument that needs addressed.
2-3 para.
1 para.
1 para.
Present your argument.
Lead - Engaging statement or anecdote
Claim - Answers Prompt
Forecast - Preview of main points (May be joined with Claim)
Link - Transitions to body
A restatement of claim and forecast in a new, exciting way
Wow statement/Call to Action - provides emphasis and finality
Leaves reader convinced and enthused.
Introduction

Primary Argument
Least powerful
More powerful
Most powerful

Opposing Arg. &
Counterclaim

Conclusion
Present your points in a PEAL format.
Attempt to provide as much evidence and analysis as possible from sources.
A point lacking evidence and analysis is worthless.
2-3 para.
1 para.
1 para.
1 para.
Present your argument.
Lead - Engaging statement or anecdote
Claim - Answers Prompt
Forecast - Preview of main points (May be joined with Claim)
Link - Transitions to body
When applicable, this paragraph will start by introducing the other side of the argument (opposing arg. - Opp. Arg.) and why other people believe it is correct.
You will then prove why the other side of the argument is wrong (counterclaim - CC), and why your position is the better option.
This paragraph can follow the introduction or precede the conclusion - it is best before the conclusion.
*Other options available.
A restatement of claim and forecast in a new, exciting way
Wow statement/Call to Action - provides emphasis and finality
Leaves reader convinced and enthused.
It is essential that you include transitions or signals to show you are moving from supporting details to opposing argument to counterclaim.
The simple inclusion of these words can have a great impact on the readability of your argument.
This will help you gain clarity, focus, and organization.
Transitions
Transitional Words
Transitional Words
Your body paragraphs should reflect your forecast from your introduction.
Each body paragraph should be ordered in the same sequence as your forecast.
Body Paragraph Points
P
oint - Determine your point or claim

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
P

E

A

L
PEAL
P
oint - Determine your point or claim

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
P

E1

A1

E2

A2

L
PEAEAL
Not Applicable
O
pposing
A
rgument

- Present what you anticipate your opponent's argument may be

C
ounter
c
laim - Refute the opposing argument by providing a point to diminish (squash) their POV

E
vidence - Provide evidence for your claim (quote, detail, fact)

A
nalysis - Clarify the relationship between claim and evidence

L
ink - Link to a theme, a progression of ideas, or a claim
OA

CC


E

A

L
OA/CC-EAL
Conclusion
Intensified Insight -
Statement that deepens the idea of the thesis/claim.
Call to Action
Finality -
Summary -
Brief restatement of claim and body paragraph points without simply repeating them.

Tie up any and all loose ends.
Should college be free?
Drone
Conclusion
Intensified Insight -
Statement that deepens the idea of the thesis/claim.
Finality -
Summary -
Brief restatement of claim and body paragraph points without simply repeating them.

Tie up any and all loose ends.
*
*
*
*
Evidence
Choosing Relevant Evidence
What you know ...
You must
provide textual evidence from each of the provided sources.

You must
cite which source you got your evidence from.

You must
provide an analysis of your evidence that explains how it supports your point.

What evidence do you include?
Offer evidence that
agrees with your claim
, but make sure it leaves room for you to offer your interpretation/analysis.

Present evidence that
contradicts your claim
, and then argue against (rebuttal) that evidence and therefore strengthen your position.

Use quotations to
support your point
, not merely to state or restate your claim.

Present evidence to
clarify or define an important detail
used to support your claim.

Quotes should not be longer than a sentence, or even a couple of words. Only quote the specific part of the sentence that provides support to your claim.

Do not select a quote that explains everything for you- make sure the quote you choose leaves room for you to add some interpretation of your own.

Things to consider ...
OA
CC
E
A
L
Key Points
Sample Prompts
Sample Prompts
Skocik
MLA Citation Format
Parenthetical Citations
OWL Purdue
Practice
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/
The best resource for MLA formatting:
Full transcript