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Alaska Water Wise

Office of Boating Safety
by

Kelli Toth

on 19 January 2017

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Transcript of Alaska Water Wise

Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation
Important to Alaskan lifestyle:
• Transportation, subsistence, recreation
• More boats than snow machines or ATVs
Boating
in
Alaska
Alaska Boating Fatalities From 1990 Through 2012:
339 Commercial Fishing
469 Recreational Boating
Why is Alaska’s fatality rate so high?
Some segments of the boating community
have not yet developed a safety culture.
Alaska's Boating Fatalities
9 of 10 boats <26 ft.
3 of 4 power boats
50/50 fresh and saltwater
9 of 10 adult males
5 of 6 capsizing/swamping/falling overboard
*
*100% associated with cold water
Death on Water: An Analysis of Non-Commercial
Boating Fatalities in Alaska 1991-2000
Susan D. Hargis, MA, MS

Cold Water Immersion
Cold Shock
If not wearing a life jacket,
a higher risk of drowning.
• Within 3-5 minutes

• Uncontrollable gasping
and hyperventilation,
change in heart rate,
rhythm and blood
pressure
Cold Incapacitation
• Within first
30 minutes

• Arms and
legs begin to
lose sensation
and function
If not wearing a life jacket,
a higher risk of drowning.
Wearing a life jacket
may extend survival time.
• After 30 minutes
(or more)

• Gradual drop in body
core temperature,
eventually causing
unconsciousness
Immersion Hypothermia
• All boats must have a
PFD for each person on
board or being towed
• Most boats 16 feet and
longer must have a
type IV PFD
• All life jackets must be:
- U.S. Coast Guard approved
- Serviceable
- Worn in accordance
with the label
AS 05.25.10 (d & e)
AS 05.25.010 (g)
All persons
under the age
of 13
MUST WEAR
a U.S. Coast
Guard approved
type I, II or III
life jacket
in an open
boat or on deck.
Cold Shock
Cold
Incapacitation
Immersion Hypothermia
Cold Water Immersion Stages
Pledgetolive.org
File a Float Plan
When to File a
Boat Accident
Report
•Did the injury require
more than first aid?
•Was their damage
over $500, or
complete loss of
vessel?
•Was there a missing
person or fatality?
Send Completed Reports To: Alaska Office of Boating Safety
Visit us
on the
Internet
Copyright 2016 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Alaska Boating Requirements
Vessels 12 m (40 ft.) or more must have a whistle or horn.

Vessels under 12 m may have a whistle, horn or other sound producing device.
Sound Signals
AS 05.25.010 (A)(1)
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
05.25.010 (A)(I)
• Requirements for day signals
depending on boat length and
type of propulsion

• Between sunset and sunrise all
boats must carry approved
nighttime visual distress signals
Pyrotechnic devices must be in serviceable condition, accessible,
not expired and U.S. COAST GUARD APPROVED
Fire/Explosion Prevention
AS 05.25.010(a)(2)
Fire Extinguishers: Requirements
depend on vessel length and
configuration. Must be USCG
approved and mounted with a
marine bracket

Ventilation Systems: Required in
compartments with stored
combustibles or gas engines

Backfire Flame Arrestor: Required for all inboard engines
Fire Extinguisher Requirements Dependent on Vessel Lengths
AS 05.25.010 (A)(3)
AS 05.25.010 (A)(3)
Fire Extinguishers
Boat Registration
AS 05.25.55
State registration required with Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles
for undocumented vessels with machinery propulsion
Certificate of number must be on board while operating
“AK” Numbers & Decals
AS 05.25.055
Registration numbers and validation decals are required for boats with motorized propulsion and must be:

On both sides of bow, contrasting color, proper size, and spacing
Non-motorized boats may display a single validation decal:
On either side or on top of bow
Registering Your Boat In Alaska
AS 05.25.055
• Registration is valid for 3 years
• If new to the State of Alaska, your boat
registration from another state is valid for
90 days
Who enforces state boating laws?
-State Peace Officers
Lights And Sound
AS 05.25.10
During the period of time extending from sunset to sunrise and
during periods of restricted visibility, a boat placed on water of
the state must display lights of the same number, type and
specifications as required by the
United States Coast Guard
NAVIGATION LIGHTS & SOUND
•Every vessel is required to carry a sound making device and signal intentions when maneuvering
•Requirement and configuration varies with boat length, and type of propulsion
Sailing or Manually Propelled Vessels Under 7 Meters
Must display a white light in sufficient time to prevent collision.
DWI
Intoxication definitions for recreational vessel
operators:
Federal and State Law:
0.08% blood alcohol content (BAC)
OR
behavior that meets a certain
standard.

DWI laws apply to all vehicles
(boats and cars). Includes canoes
and kayaks.

DWI convictions while boating count against your state auto driver’s license.
Boats 26 to 40 feet:
-With no fixed system: Two B-I
extinguishers or one B-II extinguisher
-With a fixed system*: One B-I
Vessel less than 26 feet:
-With no fixed system: One
B-I extinguisher
-With a fixed system*: None
required
Boats 40 to 65 feet:
-With no fixed system: Three B-I or
one B-II and one B-I
-With a fixed system*: Two B-I or one B-II
Protect your property and our water resources!
*Fixed system such as Halon extinguisher system
Copyright 2013 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Copyright 2013 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Copyright 2013 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Copyright 2013 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Copyright 2013 - State of Alaska, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Office of Boating Safety ©
Syllabus
Hour one: Registration, Introduction, Section 1
Section 1: Boats and Boat
Operations
Section 2: Other Boating and
Water Operations
Section 3: Trip Planning and
Preparation
Lunch
Section 4: Legal Requirements
Section 5: Navigation Rules
Section 6: Accident Prevention and Survival
Hour Seven: Exam and evaluations
Section 1
Boats and Boat Operations
State the four areas of focus for
preventative maintenance
on a boat
State three pieces of information on a
capacity plate

Identify at least four items to check before
towing a boat and trailer
Identify at least one rule for
loading a boat
safely
Identify the safest
scope for anchoring
Identify the correct approach when
anchoring or mooring
Boat Capacity & LOADING
Swamping and Capsizing:
Leading cause of boating fatalities
Nearly half of all capsizing emergencies result in one or more deaths
Overloading and improperly balanced boats are a leading cause of capsizing and swamping

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Capacity Plates

Maximum total weight of passengers, gear, and engine


Maximum number of persons the boat can carry


Maximum recommended engine horsepower (only for boats designed to be equipped with outboard engines)

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Boarding and Loading
Safely load gear:

Hand one item at a time

If solo, get into the boat first and retrieve items from the dock

Place gear so bow is lighter than the stern

Secure load so it will not shift while underway

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
FUEL

ELECTRIC
Spark Plugs
Bright and visible spark

No fouling/corrosion

Wires and plugs in good
condition & firmly seated

Plug boots greased
Battery
Battery secured in place

Terminals clean and cables secure- no arc potential

Maintain water level

Check and charge
regularly
Wiring
Marine grade and proper gauge

Secured in place

Connections not corroded, treated with anti-corrosion product

Check for abrasion/loose connections

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
HULL
Check through-hull fittings and hose clamps, double clamp is best practice

Bilge pump(s) clear and operational
All fittings and clamps secure and tight

Inspect hull, leaks and cracks, repair as needed

Keep bottom free of marine growth


Engines
Pre-trip inspection includes a test run for ALL engines
Follow manufacturer’s maintenance schedule carefully
Keep maintenance and repair logs
Check all fluid levels and quality prior to every trip.
Operator Responsibilities
Perform a pre-departure check list
Have required safety equipment in good condition, on board; know how to use it and brief all passengers
Maintain a proper lookout
Always file a float plan

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Transport and Trailering
Alaska law requires boat trailers to be registered and trailer lights to be functional

Check vehicle, trailer, and tongue capacities before towing

Check hitch attachment to frame and coupler connections

Preventive Maintenance
Maneuvering with a Trailer
Allow more time for stopping and more room for turning.
When backing:

Use a spotter or get out and inspect the area

Place one hand at 6 o’clock on the steering wheel, turn the bottom of the wheel in the direction you want the trailer to go

Proceed slowly, pull forward to make major corrections

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Launching a Boat
Prepare for launch before reaching ramp

Replace drain plugs, if removed

All passengers should exit the vehicle and the driver should release seat belt, unlock doors, and roll down windows

Beware of working behind the vehicle while launching

Ensure ramp is clear

Launching A Boat
Check engine/hull for damage during transit

Slowly back down the ramp until rear trailer tires, not axle, are in the water

Boat Handling Basics
Everyone should always wear a lifejacket in an open boat or on an open deck

Use an engine cut-off-switch. Wireless devices are available and highly recommended.

Always carry an effective means of communication and signaling (differs for different areas)

Avoid a “day trip” mentality; be prepared to spend a night out

Power boats are most easily maneuvered against current or wind. When moving with current and wind, adjust speed for better control

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
OPERATIONS???
Retrieving a Boat
Essentially the opposite of launching:

Raise out drive/outboard engine

Use caution while winching the boat onto the trailer

Pull well away from the ramp area after retrieving boat onto trailer- avoid “ramp rage.”

Rinse trailer and boat with fresh water following salt water immersion to prevent corrosion and the spread of aquatic invasive species

Make sure boat is de-watered (pull plugs)

Prepare for safe towing

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Docking
Plan ahead and assign duties

Cover safety rules- don’t get body parts between the dock and boat, keep feet and hands clear when handling lines

Have lines, fenders, and a boat hook ready

Approach dock slowly; be ready to use sound signals

Consider effects of wind and currents when maneuvering to the dock

Procedures vary
depending on boat type, wind, and water
conditions
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Docking
Approach the dock at a shallow angle
Reverse engine to stop
Secure dock lines

Special considerations:
Right rotating propellers pull the stern to the left when reversed.
Twin engines used in opposition improve maneuverability
Mooring
Prepare the vessel for the approach as if docking

Head the bow into the wind and current. If wind and current are coming from different directions, approach so the vessel drifts away from the mooring when not under power

As you reach the mooring pennant, have all headway off

Have crew wearing PFD ready to catch the pennant with a boat hook

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Anchoring
Basic equipment (ground tackle) for all boats:
Rode = (anchor line + cable/chain)
Scope = Rode:Water Depth + Freeboard
Anchors are designed for horizontal not vertical loading

Line sufficient diameter, length and strength, nylon is best, for strength AND stretch

Chain between anchor and line: Helps prevent chafing of the line, Puts more weight on the bottom, Reduces scope necessary for anchor to hold

Anchor of sufficient size for vessel, appropriate for type of bottom

BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
Set vehicle brakes and block the wheels

Push boat off trailer while boat lines are tended on dock/shore

Once floating, disconnect and secure cable to trailer winch
Double chain trailer to vehicle in an “X”, with hooks facing the boat

Match tow ball with trailer tongue coupler, ensure snug fit

Make sure trailer lights are connected and operational
Help Prevent the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species
BEFORE launching...BEFORE leaving:
-Remove
aquatic plants and animals
-Drain
sea, lake or river water, before leaving the ramp area
-Dispose
of unwanted live bait and worms in trash
-Rinse
boat and equipment with high pressure or hot water, before you leave the ramp area OR
-Dry
for at least 5 days
Elodea
D. Vexillum
BOATS AND BOAT OPERATIONS
ANCHORING
Full transcript