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The Pleasure of Reading

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by

Pittagay Walker

on 14 March 2014

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Transcript of The Pleasure of Reading

Video:


Final Destination:
SOAPSTone:
Speaker:
William Lyon Phelps (1865-1943)
attended Yale and Harvard University
American educator, literary critic and author
Served as a Professor of English at Yale
well-known speaker who drew large crowds.
had a radio show, wrote daily newspaper column, lectured frequently, and published numerous popular books and articles.
Occasion:
On April 6, 1933, he delivered this speech, titled "The Pleasure of Books," during a radio broadcast.
Audience:
Americans as a whole (general)
Students
Educators
Purpose:
elaborate on his reverence of books
express how books can be used for many other things
persuade and inspire the audience that books are an essential factor of life
Tone:
powerful, persuasive, motivational and inspirational


Reverence for books
"One should have one's own bookshelves, which should not have
doors, glass windows, keys,
......."
Aysydeton- use of commas

"Books are of
the people
, by
the people
, for
the people
"
Epistrophe, repetition of "the people at the end of each clause

But in a private library, you can at any moment converse with
Socrates or Shakespeare or Carlyle or Dumas or Dickens or Shaw or Barrie or Galsworthy.
Allusion, reference to person, place, or thing


Pittagay Walker
AP Lang/Comp
Due Date 3/14/14
The Pleasure of Books
William Lyon

Rhetorical Devices:
"
You cannot
leave it carelessly,
you cannot
mark it,
you cannot
turn down the pages,
you cannot
use it familiarly."

Anaphora: repetition of "you can not" at the beginning of each clause.


"You should own no book that you are afraid to mark up,
or
afraid to place on the table,
or
wide open and face down"

Polysydeton: use of conjunctions
Rhetorical Devices: Cont.
http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/phelps.htm
Rhetorical Devices:
"
You cannot
leave it carelessly,
you cannot
mark it,
you cannot
turn down the pages,
you cannot
use it familiarly."

Anaphora: repetition of "you can not" at the beginning of each clause.


"You should own no book that you are afraid to mark up,
or
afraid to place on the table,
or
wide open and face down"

Polysydeton: use of conjunctions
Sources:
http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/phelps.htm

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/455456/William-Lyon-Phelps
Full transcript