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A cell is like a house

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Brendan Granahan

on 15 October 2012

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Transcript of A cell is like a house

A Cell is Like a House
Brendan Granahan The gates of a house act as the cell membrane
They are selectively permeable and only allow some things to pass through or go out.
This helps the cell maintain materials it needs and discards materials it doesn't need The nucleus of a cell is like the parents of a house
Parents hold genetic information and also act as the control of the house The books in a house are like chromatin
The books make up the information in the nucleus (parents)
This is where (genetic) information is given to the parents Ribosomes act as the kitchen of a house
They make proteins(food) to be used for the cell
They can be found on the rough ER The first aid of a house acts as smooth endoplasmic reticulum
Endoplasmic reticulum helps in detoxification of poison and drugs like first aid
It is filled with anti-infection materials (enzymes) The kitchen acts as the rough endoplasmic reticulum in a house
It is where ribosomes are found along with the synthesis of proteins The appliances of a house act as ribosomes
They create proteins (food)
They are found on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (kitchen) A storage room is like the nucleolus
It is where appliances (ribosomes) begin to be constructed
They are stored and then shipped to other parts of the cell (house) Doors act as a nuclear membrane
They protect the nucleus (parents) from "intruders"
The nuclear membrane surrounds the nucleus
It allows some material and information to pass and also keeps some out A keyhole acts as nuclear pores
It allows specific material (information) to go in and out to the nucleus (parents)
Also it can keep material out A mailbox represents a Golgi
Golgi Bodies sort, package, and then ship molecules to places in the cell or different cells
Mail boxes are used to ship packaged materials The fuse box in a house acts as the mitochondria
It is the "powerhouse" of the cell
Just like mitochondria, a fuse box converts electricity (food) into energy
It is essential to keep the cell (house) stable The pantry is like the vacuoles of a house
It stores food, water and other substances to be consumed like vacuoles
The food and water is used for energy The houses bricks act as microfilaments
They support the cell (house) structure
They are very numerous and they all make up the cell Hallways act as microtubules
They allow people and information to travel from place to place in the cell (house)
They are necessary to transport materials to specific areas of the cell House cleaning products act as lysosomes in a house
They "break down" parts of the house for cleaning
They also "wash away" materials that cannot be used anymore Each part of the cell or house has a specific job to do
They need to be interdependent to keep the house or cell sustainable
Every part needs to work together Citations
Chromatin." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 14 Oct. 2012. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatin>.

"Cytoskeleton." Cell Organelles:. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/cytoskel.htm>.

"Cells and Organelles." Cells and Organelles. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Oct. 2012. <http://biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio104/cells.htm>.

Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Biology. Saddle River: Pearson Education, 2010. Print.
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