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EDCOM

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Die Hard

on 31 July 2017

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Transcript of EDCOM

ARE
YOU
SATISFIED
WITH
OUR
TRIFOCALIZATION
SOURCES
• https://www.scribd.com/doc/233132057/Trifocalization-of-the-Philippine-Education
• The EDCOM Report of 199: A Special Project in School Legislation, 2013
• http://www.powershow.com/view1/20b535-ZDc1Z/Philippine_Agenda_for_Educational_Reform_The_PCER_Report_2000_powerpoint_ppt_presentation
• http://ourhappyschool.com/education/46-important-information-about-pcer

Congressional Commission on Education or EDCOM was established by a Joint Resolution of the Eight Philippine Congress
EDCOM
Quijano, Jimnoel C.
II - 24 BSCIEPHY

PCER
Developments in Education
EDUCATION
SYSTEM?
June 17, 1990

To identify its status, what it really needs, and its future path.
To review the current educational set-up in the country
EDCOM was composed of
Five (5) congressmen
Five (5) senators
Chairman
(from the Senate)
Co-Chair
(from the House)


It was assisted by
Technical Secretariat
Three (3) panels of consultant
EDCOM conducted both intensive and extensive research studies to determine the real status of education system in the country through involving every component of the stakeholders group.

EDCOM
REPORT OF
1991
FINDINGS
RECOMMENDATIONS
Dialogues and consultations were also made with different academe and professional individuals, experts and groups concerning on different specific field of education.
Early Childhood and Preschool Education
Elementary and Secondary Education
Teacher Education
Military Education
Educational Research and Evaluation
Tertiary Education
Vocational and Technical Training
Guidance and Counseling
Graduate Education
Education in Specific Professions
Governance, Financing and Economics Education
Testing and Measurement of Learning Outcomes
Special Education
Education of Indigenous People
Language Instruction
In 1991, Philippines had the most expanded school systems among the countries of the world by having the highest participation rate in elementary, secondary and tertiary levels.
97.78%
Participation in Elementary Level
(1991)
89%
Literacy rate in the Philippines
(1991)
73%
Functional Literacy rate in the Philippines
(1991)
BUT
even the credited recognitions showed how commendable superficially our education system was, the findings of EDCOM revealed very perplexing and disturbing upshots.
JUST
A
QUICK
OVERVIEW
Too little investment in Education
1.
Disparities in Access in Education
2.
Low Achievement
3.
In 1991, only 1.3% of the GDP was allotted to education sector.
Average pupils only learn 55% or less of what must be learned.
High Drop-out Rate
4.
Rural and less developed communities are prone of drop-out cases.
Special Needs Neglect
5.
Educational needs in Muslims and cultural communities were being neglected.
Limited ECE and NFE Services
6.
Early Childhood Education and Non formal Education Services were rare, inaccessible and inadequate.
Schooling Length and Class Interruptions
7.
Disruptions in class schedules and inadequate length of schooling correlate with less learning and less quality of education.
Inadequate science and technology
8.
Modern classroom instructions were either inadequate or unsuited.
Ineffective Values Education
9.
Values Education (VE) in schools is lacking and ineffective.
Bilingual Education affects learning
10.
The use of Filipino and English as a mode of instruction distresses the quality of learning.
Manpower Mismatched
11.
There is an incompatibility in the supply and demand for educated and trained Filipinos.
Irrelevance of Education
12.
Education is seen to be irrelevant and insignificant to individual and social needs of the Filipinos.
Incompetent Training and Instruction
13.
Trained and effective teachers were inadequate. Graduate studies were found to be mediocre, limited and underdeveloped.
Ineffective and inefficient organization
14.
Philippine Education System has "ineffective and inefficient" organizational structure.
CONCLUSION
The report showed that same problem were reported since the Monroe Survey in 1925.
No significant improvement in Philippine Education is seen for over 65 years.
The prioritization of basic education by to ensure the then Department of Education, Culture and Sports’ (DECS) undivided attention to this
sector;
The development of alternative learning modes especially for literacy acquisition;
The use of the mother tongue as language of learning from Grades 1 to 3, with Filipino gradually becoming the medium of instruction in basic education and English a subsidiary medium of instruction in later years;
The expansion
and enrichment of technical/vocational education
The strengthening of pre-service teacher education and provision of incentives to make the rewards of teaching commensurate to its importance as a career;
Professionalization of teachers and teaching with licensure exams and increase in the basic minimum wage salary
Support for
both public
and private
education;
The facilitation of planning, delivery, and education financing and training by industry, workers, teachers, parents and local governments
Greater access of poor children to all levels of education
More cost-effective public college and university education with curricular programs that are relevant to the communities they serve
The search for new sources of funds (including taxes) to finance basic education;
Strengthening
graduate education
and research
Creation of Commission on Higher Education (CHED) to be the main body responsible for colleges and universities, both private and public
The restructuring of the Department of Education, Culture and Sports’ (DECS), now Department of Education (DepEd), to ensure clearer program focus, rational resource allocation and realistic planning
REFORMS
LEGISLATIVE
Congressional Oversight Committee on Education
was established under the Chairs of the Committee on Education of both houses
RA 7784:
Teacher Education Council Act of 1994
An Act to Strengthen Teacher Education in the Philippines by Establishing Centers Of Excellence, Creating a Teacher Education Council for the Purpose, Appropriating Funds therefor, and for Other Purposes
RA 7836:
Philippine Teacher Professionalization Act of 1994
An Act to Strengthen the Regulation and Supervision of the Practice of Teaching in the Philippines and Prescribing a Licensure Examination for Teachers and for Other Purposes
Glimpse
on the Laws Anchored in
EDCOM
Report
RA 7797:
Lengthening School Calendar Act of 1994
An Act to Lengthen the School Calendar from Two Hundred (200) Days to not More than Two Hundred Twenty (220) Class Days
RA 7722:
Higher Education
Act of 1994
An Act Creating the Commission on Higher Education, Appropriating Funds Therefor and for Other Purposes
RA 7796:
Technical Education and Skills Development Act of 1994
An Act Creating the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority, Providing for its Powers, Structure and for Other Purposes
of Philippine
Education
HISTORY
Education Act of 1982
The creation of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport which was later named as Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS) by the virtue of Executive Order No. 117
EDCOM Report of 1991
EDCOM report suggested to establish the trifocalized system where higher and technical educations will be a separate department.
1994
Establishment of Commission on Higher Education (CHED) by the virtue of Republic Act 7722.
1995
Establishment of Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) by the virtue of Republic Act 7796.
The administration of education system is now decentralized into three foci having three different agencies forefront the three educational levels of the system.
Decentralized Education System
REFORMS
EXECUTIVE
ADMINISTRATIVE
1.
Reduction of the number of incomplete elementary schools throughout the country
2.
Increase in the number of high schools in provinces and towns
3.
Increase in teachers’ salary from Salary Grade 10 to Salary Grade 17, throughout the annual budget of the DECS.
4.
Flexibility in the use of the Bilingual Policy in the elementary grades. Teachers are allowed to use the dominant language of the community as medium of instruction.
THE THREE
ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES
OF EDUCATION
Department of Education
, also known as DepEd, forefronts the country's basic education covering the primary, secondary and non-formal education systems.
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
, also known as TESDA, spearheads the country's technical and vocational trainings, typically in two-year post secondary programs.
Commission on Higher Education
, also known as CHED, heads the administration of four-year post-secondary and other advanced degrees.
1. Poor quality of education
2. Shortfalls in classrooms
3. Shortfalls in textbooks and teachers
4. Low achievement in science, math and language
5. Disparity in rural and uraban areas in terms of achievement
6. Declining participation of private sector
Reasons for pursuing the decentralization of the Philippines Education System
PCER
2000
Presidential Commission on Educational Reform
HISTORY
Through Executive Order No.46, President Joseph Ejercito Estrada established the multisectoral Presidential Commission on Educational Reform (PCER).
It is expected to craft a "budget feasible" program to address the concerns in equipping Filipinos with world class education.
- President Joseph Ejercito Estrada
"Without world class education, we Filipinos will remain a nation of low cost wage earners and outcasts from the highly competitive global labor market"
December 7, 1998

PCER was a
multi-sectoral body
that was comprised of representatives from government line agencies, the University of the Philippines, the Open University - University of the Philippines; public and private schools at all levels; teachers; the agriculture and industry sectors; the information technology sector; state colleges and universities; and other concerned sectors.

Dr. Victor Ordoñez
UNESCO Regional Director for Asia
Appointed Chairman of Philippine Commission on Educational Reform
Springboards of PCER Study
• The EDCOM findings
• The Philippine Education Sector (PESS) study jointly conducted by the World Bank and Asian Development Bank
• NEDA’s (1998) Medium Term Philippine Development Plan (MTPDP)
• Various internet resources
PCER's mandate revolved around 6 areas of concern
Financing (FIN);
Governance (GOV)
Information Technology, Science/Math Education and Other Technologies (ITSMEOT)
Medium of Instruction (MOI)
Quality Assurance (QA)
Teacher Development and Welfare (TDAW)
9
REFORM
AGENDA
1
Establishment of the National Coordinating Council for Education (NCCE)

2
Rationalization of the Creation and Conversion of State Universities and Colleges
3
Reorienting the Premises of Financing Public Higher Education
4
Establishment of a One-year Pre-baccalaureate System
5
Faculty Development at the Tertiary Level
6
Strengthening Teacher Competencies at the Basic Education Level
7
Expanding the Options for the Medium of Instruction in Grade 1
Through the Use of the Regional Lingua Franca or the Vernacular

8
Establishment of the National Educational Evaluation and Testing System (NEETS)
9
Reorienting the Premises of Financing Public Higher Education
On its completion (after 13 months), PCER had defined “budget-feasible reform measures,” and identified “executive priority policy recommendations and means for a legislative agenda on education.”
Did
PCER
succeed?
October 2000
President Joseph Ejercito Estrada became mired in a corruption scandal, and the House of Representatives impeached him in November.
January 20, 2001
Supreme Court declared the presidency vacant, effectively ousting Estrada from office, and Vice President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo was sworn in as president.
The death of Estrada administration was actually the end of PCER.
The
END
Chairman - Sen. Edgardo Angara;
Co-chairman - Cong. Carlos Padilla
Full transcript