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Nick Tipton

on 11 September 2013

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Transcript of Allusions

"You don't have to touch her, all you have to do is make her afraid, an' if assault isn't enough to lock you up for awhile. I'll get you in on the Lady's Law so get outta my sight!" (Lee 249-250)
The lady lady laws are a set of laws in Alabama back in the 1930s that basically say that if you use foul language around a woman you could be fined a to $200 or be sentenced to jail time or hard labor for 6 months.
Definition of Allusion
Referencing another event to help readers relate to a book.
Real World Example
On the Tonight Show Leno once compared Dick Cheney to Darth Vader who is a character in the movie Star Wars.
Model T Ford
Model-T Ford (on blocks): The Model-T (also known as a "tin Lizzie" or a "flivver") was Henry Ford's first popular success. Originally produced in 1909, it was affordable and relatively reliable. A car is put up on blocks for two main reasons: either it no longer has any tires, or the owner can't afford to drive it and putting it on blocks saves the tires from the damage caused by having to carry the weight of the car.

To me, this allusion represents that the economy was (on blocks), or halted by the great loss of profits to the government and its people. It also showed that even those were rich in the time and place Scout was, could not afford even to have their expensive luxuries.

" Enclosed by this barricade was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford " (Lee 188)
Lady laws
Works Cited
Interesting, new ways of representing
a modern day, or historic concept.
Fountain Pen Quote:
BookDrum. Book Drum, 2009. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. <http://www.bookdrum.com/books/to-kill-a-mockingbird/9780099419785/bookmarks-176-200.html>.
"He unscrewed the fountain-pen cap and placed it gently on
his table. He shook the pen a little, then handed it with the envelope to the witness. "Would you write your
name for us?"

(Lee 237).
Jay OLenno. N.d. TS4.mm.bing.com. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. <http://ts4.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4960477889233503&pid=1.7&w=248&h=172&c=7&rs=1, and http://www.gonzorilla.net/2011/10/dick-cheney-melts-down.html>.
Lausd.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. <http://www.lausd.net/Belmont_HS/tkm/allusions_all.html>.
Model T Ford. Tripod.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. <http://tokillamocking.tripod.com/id25.html) Pictures: http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/tkm/modeltfordpic.html>.
"Waterman Writing Pens." Internet-ink.co.uk. Abitech Systems Ltd, n.d. Web. 8
Sept. 2013. <http://www.internet-ink.co.uk/waterman-pens-history/

made by:
Jonathan Schaffer
Nick Tipton
Lauren Anderson
Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York: Warner, 1982. Print
A pen with a unique nib at the end and is refilled with ink from a bottle. These pens were the usually writing standard for writing formal documents to just writing on a scratch piece of paper. This pen allowed people to have a more creative writing style and is still used today. In the book "To Kill A Mockingbird" Atticus asked Bob Ewell to write his name with a fountain pen. Bob Ewell was right handed and Tom Robertson was left handed due to the lose of one arm. It showed that Tom Robertson could have easily been overpowered by Bob.
Fountain Pen
Fehér, János. A picture of the nib of a fountain pen. Fast Company. Fast Company & Inc, n.d. Web. 10 Sept. 2013. <http://www.fastcompany.com/3010715/
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