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Where the Sidewalk Ends

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Aravinth K

on 22 April 2014

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Transcript of Where the Sidewalk Ends

Where the Sidewalk Ends
SHEL SILVERSTEIN
Birth: September 25, 1930 [Chicago, Illinois]
Death: May 10, 1999 [Key West, Florida - Died of a heart attack]
POEM
There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the street begins,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And we'll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
For the children, they mark, and the children, they know
The place where the sidewalk ends.
Annotation

And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,

Repetition
Allusion: Referring to the place the children are describing
Meter
Rhyme scheme
Imagery: In this "place" the grass is much softer and the sun is more brighter
Symbolism: Shows children's creativity - as this place does not exist (U)
Positive Connotation: White - As in pure, clean and safe.
(Children) use chalk to draw on the sidewalk
reminiscent of our childhood
Repetition
Symbolism: Imagination
Have your ever noticed where and how a sidewalk ends? No. The sidewalk symbolizes a child imagination, because both are unpredictable.
Enjambment
Enjambment
Arrows symbolize a sense of direction and in this case it shows the path to the described "Utopia"
Alliteration
Works:
The Lion Who Shot Back (1963)
The Giving Tree (1964)
A Giraffe and a Half (1964)
A Boy Named Sue (1969)
Where the Sidewalk Ends (1974)
The Missing Piece (1976)
The Missing Piece Meets the Big O (1981)

Poetry Style:
Childish
Silly
Humorous
Interesting Facts:
Started writing poetry at 12
Enlisted in the armed forces and served in Korea and Japan
Worked for PlayBoy Magazine
Also a musician
There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the street begins,
Sidewalks are in cities and suburbs.
Line suggesting that the place is outside
of city or suburb.
Diction: Streets are associated with cities. Author does not use road.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow
Walk slowly to truly enjoy the beauty
of nature.
Put on the mindset of a child
and you will find " the place where
the sidewalk ends "
Metaphor: Humans in cities, or in general any
living thing in a city
Escape city to see
real flowers
Theme
Children really enjoy life
adults live in a depressing world
children know the place where the sidewalk ends, thus live in a world full of joy
adults should follow children to find joy and passion for life
adults have many hardships (job, relationships) and so some get depressed and start hating life
children are imaginative (peppermint wind)
Relevant Issues
Environmentalism
Stress
Importance of Imagination and Creativity
Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
Author connects with audience by including them in the journey to come
The author wants the reader to understand/feel...
Alliteration: letter arrangement puts emphasis on black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Imagery that has a negative connotation as it describes the place the author wants to leave
Negative connotation
Imagery: the dark street does not have a straight path, which means it leads to something unexpected
For the children, they mark, and the children, they know
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind
Symbolism
- Rare type of bird resting suggests it is a safe place
- Represents uniqueness and serenity
Imagery: showing the looks and sounds of the wind
Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And we'll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
Symbolism: arrows show a sense of direction and goal
- represents the way to follow to meet that goal
alliteration
Repetition: significance - outlines the result of walking out
The place where the sidewalk ends.
Repetition creates rhythm
Children mark where the sidewalks ends as they are always chasing it
The children know best about the place where the sidewalk ends
This is repeated several times throughout the whole poem to show the importance.

Rhyming
Symbolism : "cool" also meaning to relax
Literary Devices: Establishing the Theme
Symbolism
Imagery
Setting
countryside
city
human mind
TONE
Adherence to the rules
Yes we'll walk with a walk that measured and slow
And we'll go where the chalk white arrows go
Follow rules that have been made to escape from
the 'city' or darkness
Symbolism
The author uses a lot of symbolism throughout the poem which gives every line another meaning connected to the outdoor environment
Line 1:
There is a place where the sidewalk ends
Sidewalks end where the area has not yet been developed, which could also mean a place that has not been seen and is left for the imagination
Line 5:
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
moon-birds are animals of the imagination and the author uses it as a symbol of how special creatures can exist in this place
Line 9:
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
Asphalt flowers barely survive in the crevices of the ground and this is used as a symbol to represent the struggling people of the city
Structure
There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the street begins,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And we'll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
For the children, they mark, and the children, they know
The place where the sidewalk ends.
a
b
c
c
c
b
d
a
e
e
a
e
e
e
e
a
To show the theme of children and their imagination:
And there the grass grows soft and white.
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
To show the hardships of adults :
Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the puts where the asphalt flowers grow
Imagery
Speaker
perspective of somebody who really wants to be able to use their imagination
be free of the life that they are living
By the reference to black smoke, streets, and asphalt flowers, the speaker is most likely someone who lives in the city and no longer wants to

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Works Cited
"Shel Silverstein." Poets.org. Academy of American Poets, n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. <http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/104>.
"Shel Silverstein Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. <http://www.biography.com/people/shel-silverstein-9483912#awesm=~oC7DdQGLjFrLPo>.
"Shel Silverstein:Â Biography." Shel Silverstein:Â Biography. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. <http://faculty.weber.edu/chansen/humanweb/projects/MeghanUng/biography.htm>.
The biography of Sheldon Allan Silverstein. "The biography of Sheldon Allan Silverstein." Poemhunter.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. <http://www.poemhunter.com/sheldon-allan-silverstein/biography/>.
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