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The Mountain and the Squirrel

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by

Jim Kallianis

on 26 February 2016

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Transcript of The Mountain and the Squirrel

The Mountain and the Squirrel
by: Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Author
The author of this poem is Ralph Waldo Emerson. He was born on May 25, 1803 in Boston, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1821. After his wife, Ellen Tucker, died he traveled throughout Europe. When he came back he lectured on spiritual experience and ethical living. He was an American Transcendentalist poet, philosopher and essayist during the 19th century. He died on April 27, 1882 in Concord, Massachusetts.
Poem (contd.)
And I think it no disgrace
To occupy my place.
If I'm not so large as you,
You are not so small as I,
And not half so spry:
I'll not deny you make
A very pretty squirrel track.
Talents differ; all is well and wisely put;
If I cannot carry forests on my back,
Neither can you crack a nut."
Literal meaning
The literal meaning of "The Mountain and the Squirrel" is a mountain and squirrel are fighting over who is better. Each character believes that they are better than they other. The squirrel in the end tries to work it out between the two of them.
Deeper meaning
The deeper meaning of this poem is similar to the literal meaning. The mountain and the squirrel are in a fight and the squirrel is trying to fix it. If you look deeper into how the squirrel is trying to fix the problem, you can understand that the squirrel is trying to explain that both of the characters have their own unique job and specialty and it does not make one better than the other.
Poem
The Mountain and the Squirrel

The mountain and the squirrel
Had a quarrel,
And the former called the latter
"Little prig."
Bun replied,
"You are doubtless very big;
But all sorts of things and weather
Must be taken in together
To make up a year
And a sphere.

by: Rachel Kallianis
3-5 figurative language
Vocab
Personification
The whole poem is based on a squirrel and a mountain in a quarrel about you was better. They were talking about in the poem, but squirrels and mountains cannot actually talk.
Lines 3-20
Rhyme
"But all sorts of things and weather
Must be taken in together
To make up a year
And a sphere.
And I think it no disgrace
To occupy my place."

Lines 7-12
Imagery
The author is having you picture a squirrel and a mountain talking to each other about a quarrel they are in.
Consonance

Talents differ; all is
w
ell and
w
isely put;
If I
c
annot
c
arry forests on my back,
N
either
c
an you
c
rack a
n
ut."

Lines 18-20
-latter: situated or occurring nearer to the end of something than to the beginning.
-prig: a self-righteously moralistic person who behaves as if superior to others
Full transcript