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Interactions

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by

Emily Mason

on 21 September 2016

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Transcript of Interactions

Symbiosis
Other relationships
Symbiosis
Parasitism
Commensalism
Mutualism
Predation
Competition
Instructions:
Follow the path to be sure you don't miss anything.
Fill in the Interactions Tree Map as you go through the Prezi.
Study the photos and videos.
An interaction in which one organism hunts and kills another for
food
.
yum yum yum
When two or more individuals or populations try to use the same
resource
.
Compete for
food, water, shelter, space, sunlight
, and even
mates
!!
The bull elk compete for cow elk.
Shut up! You're not good enough for her!
Outta my way fool!
These trees compete for space...and also sunlight and the water in the soil.
Hyenas and lions will compete for the same food source.
Step off!
Whatever...psh...
A close,
long-term
relationship between two (or more)
DIFFERENT
species that
benefits
at least one of the species.
When
both
organisms
benefit
from the relationship.
Examples:
Sea anemone and clownfish (Finding Nemo).
Bees or birds and the flowers they pollinate.
A relationship where
ONLY ONE
species
benefits
; the other is unharmed.
Barnacles on a whale. The barnacles get a home and eat food crumbs from the whale.
The crab attaches the anenome on its shell for protection...the anenome just goes on living like it was on a stationary rock.
Remora fish attach themselves to the shark and eat the shark's food scraps.
This can happen on a tiny scale too! This is a mite with even tinier mites on top!
One species benefits, and the other is harmed.
Zombie snails
Parasitic wasp
Maggots in my Head
Worm in my Butt
These are awesome, but also a bit gross. They are excellent examples of parasitism.
Can't get enough? Search YouTube for "monsters inside me" at home.
Parasite Invasions
& some other relationships
Describe at least one of these examples in your notes!
...best title ever.
Parasite - the organism that
benefits
from
the relationship

Host - the organism that is
harmed
in the relationship
A dog and a tick have a parasitic relationship.
The dog is the HOST
The tick is the PARASITE
Predator - organism that
hunts
and kills
another
for food

Prey - organism that
gets eaten
by the predator
Co-evolution
A long-term change that takes place in TWO species because of symbiotic interactions with one another
Examples:
Acacia Tree & Ant
Hummingbird & Flower
Caterpillar & Ant
Adaptations
enable organisms to reduce competition.
Predator Adaptations
Help the predator catch & kill their prey
Speed
Stingers, toxins, & sharp teeth
Camouflage
Night Vision
Prey Adaptations
Help the prey to avoid predation; "defense strategies"
Camouflage
Prey blend in to their environment to avoid being eaten by predators.
Protective Coverings
Hedgehogs, turtles, snails, crabs all have protective coverings to help ensure their survival.
Warning Coloring
Bright colors warn predators that the prey might be poisonous and to stay away!!
Defensive Chemicals
Some animals defend themselves with chemicals.
Mimicry
Some animals resemble other animals so closely they can fool either their prey or their predators.
False Coloring
Used to trick predators
Attack of the Killer Fungi
Full transcript