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Societal Curriculum

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Jennifer Weber

on 21 September 2015

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Transcript of Societal Curriculum


Carlos Cortes defines Societal Curriculum as the, "Massive ongoing, informal curriculum of family, peer groups, neighborhoods, churches organizations, occupations, mass media, and other social forces that educate all of us throughout our lives."


Types of Curriculum. (n.d.) Retrieved August 31,
2015.

Definition of Societal Curriculum


*Immediate Curriculum

*Institutional Curriculum

*Serendipitous Curriculum

*Media Curriculum


Today's world knows this one all too well. This includes television, radio, ads, social media such as facebook, twitter, pinterest, instagram and MANY more.


This includes anyone that is remotely close to the student such as family, peers, and community. Students interact with these people on a daily basis and can be influenced greatly by them.


Societal Curriculum


These are places with groups of people that may influence the student. They include churches, synagogues, libraries, outside organizations, and other community influences. The student most likely does not have a daily interaction with these institutions, but are still influenced by them on a large scale.
Is the influence of mass media good or bad?!
By: Jennifer Weber


This is just what it sounds like...unplanned interactions. This may include interactions with people from other cultures or backgrounds.


There have been many questions whether to teach alongside Societal Curriculum or ignore it completely. Cortes suggests to embrace Societal Curriculum and use it to our advantage.






"Schools are not education. They are only part of education. In reality, two curriculums operate side by side. In addition to the curriculum we receive in school all of us receive a lifelong education through the societal curriculum" (Cortes, 1979).

Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and the School Curriculum: Allies or
Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Immediate Curriculum can influence students in many ways from their behavior to their career choice. Listen to this woman speak on why she became a writer.
Children come in contact with many different cultures throughout the day. See how children come in contact with different culture through interactive play with their peers in this video.
Institutions can have influences on students as well. See what these students have to say about religions and the influences they have on the world.

*Use it for teacher education
*Use it to aid in curriculum planning
*Use it as classroom materials
*Use it as a part of student "literacy"





Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and the School Curriculum: Allies or
Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Teacher Education
Cortes recommends that teachers keep
a societal curriculum journal. This is where the teacher would keep record of their students and their own societal beliefs. This gives teachers an insight into the what is influencing them and their students.
Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and the School Curriculum: Allies or
Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Aid to Curriculum
Cortes believes that we should use Societal Curriculum to aid our school curriculum. He says, "To teach without considering the implications of the societal curriculum is to operate in a land of make believe" (Cortes, 1979). He suggests to always ask students what they know about a topic BEFORE you teach it. This way the teacher knows the students' prior knowledge and can correct misconceptions that have been learned via Societal Curriculum.
Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and the
School Curriculum: Allies or Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Societal Curriculum as Classroom Materials
Teachers use multimedia everyday to teach, but Cortes believes that most teachers are not using it to their benefit. He says that teachers should use television, videos, and movies to, "be examined critically, including the significance as a reflection of society" (Cortes, 1979).

Societal Curriculum as Student "Literacy"
Cortes says, "A major goal of schools is to prepare young people for the future.That future will be in a world of media" (Cortes, 1979). He believes that we need to teach our children to be "literate" in Societal Curriculum. By "literate," he means that we should help build their strength in understanding media literacy.
Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and the
School Curriculum: Allies or Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Cortes, C. E. (1979). The Societal Curriculum and
the School Curriculum: Allies or Antagonists?. Educational Leadership.
Conclusion
While many things influence children
today, it seems that society is a MAJOR influence. Is Societal Curriculum good or bad? Is it an ally
or an antagonist to a teacher? That is for you to decide.
What is Societal Curriculum?

Societal Curriculum is divided into four sub groups
Immediate Curriculum
Institutional Curriculum
Serendipitous Curriculum
Media Curriculum
Do We Make Societal Curriculum an Ally or an Antagonist?
Cortes suggests using Societal Curriculum in the
classroom in four different ways.
Full transcript