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Visible Thinking

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marjorie barbosa

on 17 April 2016

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Transcript of Visible Thinking

Visible Thinking
When learners speak, write, or draw their ideas, they deepen their cognition.
Thinking routines involve:
Questioning,
Listening,
Documenting.
The 8 Cultural
Forces That Define Our Classrooms
Making Thinking Visible
Time:
Allocating time for thinking by providing time for exploring topics more in depth as well as time to formulate thoughtful responses.
Opportunities:
Providing purposeful activities that require students to engage in thinking and the development of understanding as part of their ongoing experience of the classroom.
Routines &
Structures
Scaffolding students' thinking in the moment as well as providing tools and patterns of thinking that can be used independently.
Language
Using a language of thinking that provides students with the vocabulary for describing and reflecting on thinking.
Time
Allocating time for thinking by providing time for exploring topics more in depth as well as time to formulate thoughtful responses.
Modeling
Modeling of who we are as thinkers and learners so that the process of our thinking is discussed, shared, and made visible.
Interactions &
Relationships
Showing a respect for and valuing of one another's contributions of ideas and thinking in a spirit of ongoing collaborative inquiry.
Physical
Environment
Making thinking visible by displaying the process of thinking and development of ideas. Arranging the space to facilitate thoughtful interactions.
Expectations
Setting an agenda of understanding and conveying clear expectations. Focusing on the value for thinking and learning as outcomes as opposed to mere completion of "work".
Thinking
Routines
Learning is
a product of thinking
Tools used over and over again in the classroom.
Students need to have the chance to express themselves through their thoughts.
What Makes You Say That
Interpretation with Justification Routine
1. What's going on?
2. What do you see that makes you say that?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?
This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. It promotes evidential reasoning (evidence-based reasoning) and because it invites students to share their interpretations, it encourages students to understand alternatives and multiple perspectives.
Application: When and where can I use it?
This is a thinking routine that asks students to describe something, such as an object or concept, and then support their interpretation with evidence.The routine can be adapted for use with almost any subject and may also be useful for gathering information on students' general concepts when introducing a new topic.
Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?
In most cases, the routine takes the shape of a whole class or group conversation around an object or topic, but can also be used in small groups or by individuals. When first introducing the routine, the teacher may scaffold students by continually asking the follow-up questions after a student gives an interpretation.
See Think Wonder
A routine for exploring works of art and other
interesting things

• What do you see?
• What do you think about that?
• What does it make you wonder?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?
This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry.
Application: When and Where can it be used?
Use this routine when you want students to think carefully about why something looks the way it does or is the way it is. Use the routine at the beginning of a new unit to motivate student interest or try it with an object that connects to a topic during the unit of study.
Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?
Ask students to make an observation about an object--it could be an artwork, image, artifact or topic--and follow up with what they think might be going on or what they think this observation might be. Encourage students to back up their interpretation with reasons. Ask students to think about what this makes them wonder about the object or topic.
Making this presentation visible
Let's watch a video!!
Full transcript