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Hamlet (E10)

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john meehan

on 12 April 2011

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Transcript of Hamlet (E10)

First Clown
Second Clown
Hamlet
Horatio Claudius
Gertrude
Laertes
Messenger Laertes
Ophelia
Danes Claudius
Gertrude
Horatio
Gentleman Hamlet
Rosencrantz
Guildenstern Claudius
Gertrude Hamlet
Polonius
Gertrude
Ghost Hamlet
Claudius
Polonius
Rosencrantz
Guildenstern Claudius
Polonius
Gertrude
Ophelia
Player King
Player Queen
Lucianus Hamlet
First Player
Rosencrantz
Guildenstern
Horatio 1. The Globe Theatre
2. Stratford Upon Avon
3. Lord Chamberlain’s Men
4. The King’s Men
5. The First Folio
6. Anne Hathaway
7. John Heminges
8. Henry Condell
9. Elizabethan
10. Dramatis Personae New Vocab King Hamlet Claudius Queen Gertrude Prince Hamlet Polonius Laertes Important Characters Family is the father of... remarried to... parents of... Daily Reading Breakdown Act 1, Scene 1
Act 1, Scene 2

Act 1, Scene 3
Act 1, Scene 4

Act 1, Scene 5
Act 2, Scene 1

Act 2, Scene 2
Act 3, Scene 1

Act 3, Scene 2
Act 3, Scene 3 Act 3, Scene 4
Act 4, Scene 1

Act 4, Scene 2
Act 4, Scene 3

Act 4, Scene 4
Act 4, Scene 5

Act 4, Scene 6
Act 4, Scene 7

Act 5, Scene 1
Act 5, Scene 2 1

2

3

4

5 6

7

8

9

10 Fact or Fiction: There wasn’t really an actual person named “William Shakespeare.” A man named William Shakespeare really did exist in England during the 16th century (1500s). Historical records suggest that the man was born in a town called Stratford-Upon-Avon some time in April (likely April 23) in 1564. He was an actor and a playwright, and he performed with a number of theatre companies – including the Lord Chamberlain’s Men (later known as the King’s Men) – throughout the greater London area. In 1599, the Globe Theatre was founded, and it played host to dozens of productions of Shakespeare’s plays. Shakespeare died on April 23 in 1616.

Yup. He was born on the same day of the year that he died on. FICTION Fact or Fiction: William Shakespeare was gay. FICTION Shakespeare married a woman named Anne Hathaway when he was just 18 years old (she was 26). The couple had a total of three children: Susannah, Judith, and Hamnet (who died at age 11). Anne stayed home with the kids when Shakespeare moved to London to write and produce his plays. While he was in London, it is widely believed that Shakespeare had a number of affairs with many other women.

So no, Shakespeare wasn’t gay in the least. But honestly, what’s the big deal if he was? Fact or Fiction: In Shakespeare’s day, the female roles were played by men. FACT Back in Elizabethan England, women had fewer rights than they do today. In those days, women were not supposed to hang out with men without parental supervision (because people thought that men would take advantage of the women. And many men would!).

In the 1500s and 1600s, theatres were pretty much treated like football locker rooms – places for “men to be men.” Women were allowed to attend performances, but it was considered “scandalous” and “not lady-like” for women to hang out backstage with a bunch of actors.

Since the laws of the time forbid women from acting in plays, every single theatre company up through the late 1600s was forced to cast men (often younger guys) in the female roles. Fact or Fiction:
Shakespeare was well-educated. Fact or Fiction: Other writer(s) actually wrote all of those plays and Shakespeare just inherited all of the credit. Fact or Fiction: Shakespeare stole a lot of the material in his plays and poems. Shakespeare published 37 full-length plays and well over one hundred poems. But let’s be honest, that’s a LOT of output for one particular mind to handle – even if you’re a really creative individual. In truth, Shakespeare stole – ahem – “borrowed” a great deal of his subject matter from all over the place. Greek mythology, historical events, short stories, folk tales – you name it.

Think of William Shakespeare like a famous script writer for CSI or Law & Order: he studied everything that was going on in the world around him, and wrote a whole bunch of creative stories about what all he was reading and hearing.

They say that "mediocre writers borrow, great writers steal." In that case, Shakespeare was a master thief. FACT Fact or Fiction: Shakespeare mainly wrote in formal language for formal audiences. Shakespeare had a potty mouth, a dirty mind, and a genuine love of good old-fashioned physical comedy. He uses all sorts of puns, metaphorical language, and clever wordplay in order to reach all members of his audience for entirely different reasons. Think of it like a great episode of “The Simpsons.” There are “smart” jokes thrown in to make you think, and there are “dumb” jokes thrown in just to make you laugh. Shakespeare is very much concerned with keeping the rich AND the poor audience members entertained.

Shakespeare wrote his plays in such a way that the smartest person in the room and the dumbest person in the room would be entertained for totally different reasons at the exact same time. FICTION Fact or Fiction: Shakespeare didn’t live to see a published edition of his “complete works.” Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616. While he certainly did live to see many of his plays produced individually, no collection of his plays was ever published during his lifetime. The first “complete works of Shakespeare” was published in what is known as the First Folio, which was printed by John Heminges and Henry Condell, two members of Shakespeare’s acting company – a full seven years after Shakespeare’s death (1623).

Crazy to think that the most successful writer ever to have lived never had a chance to see all of his works published in one “greatest hits” album, wouldn’t you say? FACT Fact or Fiction: Shakespearean plays are just filled with a lot of boring speeches. FICTION There are definitely a lot of speeches in Shakespeare, and at least a few of those speeches are pretty boring. But there are also a number of really powerful, inspirational speeches in Shakespeare, as well. In addition, Shakespearean plays also contain a ton of plotting, scheming, backstabbing, heartbreak, romance, betrayals, sex, adultery, revenge, murder, and – oh yeah – ghosts.

So yeah – some boring stuff… but there’s a bunch more in there, too. Fact or Fiction: Shakespearean language is “dated,” old-fashioned, and not really in use any more. Speaking
Shakespeare Shakespeare Fact or Fiction For the next ten questions, you will see a series of things that people often say about William Shakespeare. Some are true, and some are false.

Take a moment and jot down whether or not you believe each statement is FACT or FICTION. Act I, scene 1
Three guards stand watch one night at Elsinore castle. They see a ghost that looks an awful lot like their king (named King Hamlet) who recently died under “mysterious circumstances.”

Horatio shows up and doesn’t believe the guards. But then the ghost re-appears, and so Horatio decides to go tell his friend Hamlet (the son of the ghost) what’s up. Act, scene 2
We meet the queen (Gertrude) and her new husband (Claudius). Claudius is King Hamlet’s brother, and he’s been made the new king since his brother died (oh yeah, and he got to marry his dead brother’s wife. Ewww).

Polonius (the king’s BFF) and his son (Laertes) show up to say that Laertes is headed back to France where he’s been going to school. Hamlet is pissed that his dad is dead and that his mom just married his uncle, so he wants to leave for France to clear his head for a minute. His mom and his step-dad think they should keep an eye on him, so they say “no.”

Hamlet is even MORE upset then before. As he leaves the King’s chambers, Hamlet runs into his pal Horatio, who says “yo, I saw your dad’s ghost last night.” Hamlet doesn’t know WHAT to do – and so he decides to hang out outside of the castle with Horatio later that night to see what’s up. FICTION Shakespeare was actually a commoner by birth. Most of Shakespeare’s education was informal – he loved reading books (even simple, trashy ones), and books were incredibly cheap and easy to come by. As a boy, he attended the Stratford Free School, which was basically a public school. There, he learned basic subjects as well as Greek and Latin, but he didn’t make it much further in his educational endeavors. His formal education ended at age 14.

That means virtually no high school. And definitely no college. FICTION The first argument suggesting that Shakespeare didn’t actually write his own plays did not emerge until nearly fifty years after his death (roughly 1700). At that time, many “educated” people started doubting that an “uneducated commoner” could write so many of the world’s best plays, and so they came up with a theory that the works attributed to Shakespeare must have been written by someone with a more formal level of education.

In short: haters gonna’ hate, and critics hate the fact that Shakespeare was smarter than them even though he didn’t have nearly as much education as they did. FICTION Shakespearean language is definitely difficult to understand for a beginner, but Shakespeare’s language is very much alive and well in today’s society. William Shakespeare is widely credited with introducing more words and phrases into the English language than any other person in all of history.

Most scholars agree that Shakespeare was the first (or the first mainstream) writer to introduce upwards of 1600 words and phrases that we still use today! All that glitters is not gold.
All’s well that ends well.
Be-all and end-all
Brave new world
Refuse to budge an inch
Dead as a doornail
Every dog has its day
Eat me out of house and home
Elbow room
Forever and a day
For goodness’ sake
Foregone conclusion
Full circle
Give the devil his due
Good riddance
Have not slept one wink
Heart of gold
‘Tis high time
In a pickle Knock knock!
Who’s there?
Laughing stock
Laugh yourself into stitches
Lie low
Love is blind
Obvious as a nose on a man’s face
One fell swoop
Own flesh and blood
Star-crossed lovers
Parting is such sweet sorrow
Play fast and loose
Pomp and circumstance
Seen better days
Send [him] packing
Snail paced
There’s no such thing
Wear my heart on my sleeve
What’s done is done
Wild-goose chase Yorick Prince Hamlet Friends Horatio is the father of... Laertes Reynaldo Ophelia parents of... Claudius remarried to... Family Osric Old
Fortinbras The Players Gravedigger Rosencratz & Guildenstern is the father of... Important Characters Polonius of Prince Hamlet Other Folks Marcellus,
Francisco, and
Bernardo King Hamlet Queen Gertrude Young
Fortinbras Based on Act One, Hamlet is both an heir apparent and a grief-stricken teenager. Which of the following would best describe Hamlet’s personality?

A. Humble and gracious
B. Introspective and forlorn
C. Charismatic and trusting
D. Intelligent and inattentive Warm-Up Reinventing the Wheel For the first time, you (“the smart kids”) are finding yourselves confronted with a text that is – ahem – “smarter” than you are. The language is VERY confusing! Chances are, you are feeling very similar to those “slower” students from other classes you may have taken. You understand each word’s meaning, but you have no idea what the sentences mean. RELAX. This is totally normal for newcomers to Shakespeare. It WILL begin to make sense gradually. We will read and discuss.
We will summarize and explore gist.
We will discuss the technical complexities of the task of reading Shakespeare.
We will interpret and analyze.
We will write sentences.
We will write analyses.
Throughout all of this, we will prepare for the H.S.A. Our Process Daily Reading You will either read a part of take notes for the class.
Select parts as we reach scenes.
Do not HOG a part.
Be aware that you may not be selected on one day because other’s also wish to read.
Notes – by the end of class, you must have listed five of any of these (mix and match is okay)




At different times, EVERYONE, including readers will respond in a reader’s writer’s notebook. Questions worth discussing
Facts that are important
Reactions to the text. Questions Facts Reactions Let's recap I.i using our brand new QFR chart What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? QUESTIONS FACTS REACTIONS What was challenging here?

How can someone deal with these challenges? What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite (all students) Horatio saw the guards and then he saw a ghost.
There was a ghost that looked like Hamlet's dad.
Horatio decided to tell Hamlet about the ghost. Which of the following best combines these three sentences into one sentence? Read these three sentences: A. Three guards saw a ghost that looked like Hamlet's dad, and so did Horatio, who decided to tell Hamlet about the ghost.
B. Horatio and three guards saw a ghost that looked like Hamlet's dad.
C. Hamlet's dad was a ghost, and Horatio and the guards saw it so they told Hamlet.
D. After seeing three guards and a ghost that looked like Hamlet's Dad, Horatio decided to tell Prince Hamlet. Analysis Quickwrite Why does Horatio decide to go and speak with Prince Hamlet? REACTIONS FACTS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Let's keep reading and recapping I.ii using
our QFR chart QUESTIONS Selection Quiz 1. What are three reasons why Hamlet might be upset?

2. Why does Claudius say Hamlet is being "unmanly?"

3. Why had Laertes returned to Elsinore?

4. What is the theme of Hamlet's first soliloquy?

5. What was Horatio's reason for coming to Elsinore? Hamlet - "The Original Emo Kid" "O God! God!
How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable,
Seem to me all the uses of this world!" What is Hamlet's M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with Horatio?

What does he think of Horatio? I.ii Dramatis Personae Hamlet
Horatio
Marcellus A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story. motivation Working with a partner, look for what Hamlet says to Horatio from page 17-19 and what his motive is for saying what he says.

Use this chart to help you! Hamlet's Statements/Actions Hamlet's
Motive QUESTIONS Let's read and recap I.iii using our QFR chart FACTS REACTIONS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Laertes
Ophelia
Polonius I.iii Dramatis Personae Quickwrite (all students) What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Here are some possible Quickwrite Responses to “What’s going on?” Three guards and Horatio saw a ghost.

There was a ghost that looked like Hamlet's dad.

Horatio decided to tell Hamlet about the ghost. Combine these sentences into one grammatically correct sentence. Here are some possible Quickwrite Responses to “What’s going on?” Laertes leaves for France.
Polonius warns Ophelia to stay away from Hamlet.
Laertes gives Ophelia some parting advice. Combine these sentences into one grammatically correct sentence. Day 1 A. Laertes and Polonius offered Ophelia advice to stay away from Hamlet.

B. Laertes left for France, and Polonius warned Ophelia to stay away from Hamlet

C. Both Laertes and Polonius offered Ophelia advice, and Laertes left for France.

D. Ophelia received advice from her father and her brother. Read these three sentences: Laertes leaves for France.
Polonius warns Ophelia to stay away from Hamlet.
Laertes gives Ophelia some parting advice. Which of the following best combines these three sentences into one sentence? Why do Laertes and Polonius warn Ophelia about Hamlet? Analysis Quickwrite Hamlet
Horatio
Marcellus I.iv Dramatis Personae Let's read and recap
I.iv using our QFR chart QUESTIONS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? FACTS REACTIONS 1. What are three pieces of advice that Polonius gives Laertes?

2. Name three reasons Polonius gives Ophelia to stay away from Hamlet

3. What are three personality traits we could use to characterize Polonius?

4. What might be going through Ophelia's mind at this time?

5. Who is more persuasive: Laertes or Polonius? Why? Selection Quiz What is Polonius's M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with his children?

What does he think of Hamlet? Polonius - "The Tedious Old Fool" "This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man." HSA Review In Act I, scene 4, Marcellus says: "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark." This is an example of which literary device?

a. consonance
b. onomatopoeia
c. metaphor
d. assonance What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite (all students) Which of the following best combines these three sentences into one sentence? Hamlet waits with Horatio for the Ghost to reappear.

The Ghost reappears and Hamlet chases it.

Horatio didn't like the idea of Hamlet chasing the Ghost. Combine these sentences into one grammatically correct sentence. Here are some possible Quickwrite Responses to “What’s going on?” A. Hamlet chased the ghost away, then Horatio and Hamlet waited for the ghost.

B. The ghost reappeared and Horatio wasn't happy when Hamlet chased it.

C. Hamlet and Horatio waited for the ghost, and when it appeared, Hamlet chased it.

D. Against Horatio's better wishes, Hamlet chased the ghost after it appeared to the two men. Read these three sentences: Hamlet waits with Horatio for the Ghost to reappear.
The Ghost reappears and Hamlet chases it.
Horatio didn't like the idea of Hamlet chasing the Ghost. Analysis Quickwrite Why would Marcellus say "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark?" Polonius's Statements/Actions Polonius's
Motive Working with a partner, look for what Polonius says to Ophelia and/or Laertes from page 21-24 and what his motive is for saying what he says.

Use this chart to help you! Selection Quiz 1. What is one reason why the ghost might not be speaking to Hamlet?

2. Why doesn't Horatio want Hamlet to follow the ghost?

3. What is one reason why Hamlet MIGHT want to speak with the ghost?

4. What is one reason why Hamlet MIGHT NOT want to trust the ghost? Working with a partner, look for what Hamlet says to Horatio from page 26-28 and what his motive is for saying what he says.

Use this chart to help you! Hamlet's
Motive Hamlet's Statements/Actions What is Hamlet's M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with the ghost?

What does he think of the ghost? "Why? What should be the fear?
I do not set my life at a pin's fee!" Hamlet - "The Reckless Youth" I know, I know... "it makes no sense," right? soliloquy (n): a speech where one character stands alone on stage and delivers an inner monologue of his thoughts. Here comes a soliloquy! Also: What's up with that video clip?
Have stage 2 of your stamp sheet ready for review. REACTIONS FACTS QUESTIONS Let's read and recap
I.v using our QFR chart What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? I.v Dramatis Personae Hamlet
Ghost
Horatio
Marcellus In this sentence, "unfold" most nearly means?

a. spread out
b. dewrinkle
c. disclose
d. unfurl "Pity me not. But lend thy serious hearing to what I shall unfold." HSA Review In Act I, scene 5, the Ghost says: Have stage 3 of your stamp sheet ready for review. Also: Warm-Up Quickwrite (all students) What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Here are some possible Quickwrite Responses to “What’s going on?” Combine these sentences into one grammatically correct sentence. Hamlet follows the ghost to another part of the castle.

The ghost tells Hamlet the details of the King's death.

Hamlet swore to avenge his father's murder. Which of the following best combines these three sentences into one sentence? Hamlet followed the ghost to another part of the castle.
The ghost revealed the details of the King's murder.
Hamlet swore to avenge his father's death. Read these three sentences: A. After following the ghost to another part of the castle, Hamlet learned the details of his father's death, and so he swore to avenge his father.

B. The ghost told Hamlet the details of the King's death, and Hamlet swore to avenge his father.

C. After Hamlet followed the ghost to another part of the castle, the ghost told Hamlet about how the King was murdered and Hamlet swore revenge.

D. Hamlet swore to avenge his father's murder after the ghost told him what happened. Analysis Quickwrite Why might the ghost instruct Hamlet not to harm his mother? Working with a partner, look for what the Ghost says to Hamlet in Act 1.v and what his motive is for saying what he says.

Use this chart to help you! The Ghost's
Motive The Ghost's Statements/Actions What is the ghost's M.O. (modus operandi) when appearing and disappearing?

What evidence suggests the ghost is a friend?

What evidence suggests the ghost is a demon? "I am thy father's spirit,
Doomed for a certain term to walk the night." The Ghost - "Undead Friend or Foe?" Act 11 Act 1 Polonius sends Reynaldo to spy on Laertes.
Ophelia tells Polonius that Hamlet is acting crazy.
Polonius decides to tell the King about Hamlet. QUESTIONS The main idea of this passage is that:

a) Polonius is a windbag
b) Polonius is a complicated character
c) Many people interpret Polonius in different ways
d) Evidence suggests that Polonius is deceptive Quickwrite (all students) Combine these sentences into one grammatically correct sentence. HSA Review A. Polonius told Reynaldo to spy on his son, Laertes, and then his daughter, Ophelia, told him that Hamlet was acting funny, so Polonius went to see the King.

B. After sending Reynaldo to spy on Laertes and learning from Ophelia that Hamlet is acting strange, Polonius made a beeline for the King.

C. While sending Reynaldo to spy on Laertes, Polonius learned of Hamlet's strange behavior from Ophelia and thus he proceeded to the King's chambers at once.

D. Polonius was quite sneaky in this scene; first he sent a spy after his son, then he went to spy on Hamlet. Let's read and recap
II.i using our QFR chart Polonius sends Reynaldo to spy on Laertes.

Ophelia tells Polonius that Hamlet is acting crazy.

Polonius decides to tell the King about Hamlet. Analysis Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? FACTS Polonius
Reynaldo
Ophelia Father of Ophelia and Laertes, and Lord Chamberlain to King Claudius, Polonius is described as a windbag by some and a rambler of wisdom by others. It has also been suggested that he only acts like a "foolish prating knave" in order to keep his position and popularity safe and to keep anyone from discovering his plots for social advancement. In Act 1, Scene 3, Polonius gives advice to his son Laertes, who is leaving for France, in the form of a list of sententious maxims. He finishes by giving his son his blessing, and is apparently at ease with his son's departure. However, in Act 2, Scene 1, he orders his servant Reynaldo to travel to Paris and spy on Laertes and report if he is indulging in any local vice. Laertes is not the only character Polonius spies upon. He is fearful that Hamlet's relationship with his daughter will hurt his reputation with the king and instructs Ophelia to "lock herself from [Hamlet's] resort." Here are some possible Quickwrite Responses to “What’s going on?” Read these three sentences: II.i Dramatis Personae Which of the following best combines these three sentences into one sentence? Why might Hamlet be acting so strangely towards Ophelia all of the sudden? REACTIONS Which of the following would not be an appropriate caption for this photograph? a) Polonius bids Laertes farewell as Ophelia looks on.

b) Ophelia watches intently as her father dispenses parting advice.

c) Laertes dispenses words of wisdom as Polonius bids adieu

d) Ophelia watches her brother receive words of wisdom from her dad. Polonius: And then, sir, does 'a this -- 'a does -- what was I about to say? By the Mass, I was about to say something. Where did I leave? HSA Review Judging from this excerpt, what phrase best describes Polonius?

a) Polonius is a redundant windbag
b) Polonius is absent-minded
c) Polonius is pious and reverent
d) Polonius is malicious and deceptive Polonius's
Motive Working with a partner, look for what Polonius says to Reynaldo and/or Ophelia from page 36-40 and what his motive is for saying what he says.

Use this chart to help you! What is Polonius's M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with his children?

What does he think of Hamlet? Polonius's Statements/Actions Polonius - "The Meddlesome Father" "See you now,
Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth." Warm-Up Take the first seven minutes of today's class to work with a partner and peer review a fellow student's rough draft. Peer Review Tips Highlight at least one thing that you like about the draft.

Highlight at least one thing in the draft that needs improvement.

Write at least one suggestion that would help make the paper longer and stronger. Which word best describes Hamlet's attitude towards the ghost? a. ambivalent
b. obedient
c. defiant
d. indignant HSA Review HSA Review Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast,
With witchcraft of his wit, with traitorous gifts,--
O wicked wit and gifts, that have the power
So to seduce!--won to his shameful lust
The will of my most seeming-virtuous queen: HSA Review In Act I, scene 5, Hamlet says: a. insolent
b. inflammatory
c. inspired
d. insipid In this passage, Hamlet compares an "adulterate beast" to:
a. that incestuous
b. Gertrude
c. witchcraft
d. Claudius In Act I, scene 5, Hamlet says: Remember thee!
Yea, from the table of my memory
I'll wipe away all trivial fond records,
All saws of books, all forms, all pressures past,
That youth and observation copied there;
And thy commandment all alone shall live
Within the book and volume of my brain,
Unmix'd with baser matter: yes, by heaven! The tone of this passage can best be described as: HSA Review In Act I.v, Prince Hamlet met the ghost. ______________. The ghost told Hamlet how he was murdered by Claudius. Hamlet swore revenge. This student paragraph requires revisions and edits. Read the paragraph. Then answer the following: Which sentence best adds supporting details and fills the blank in the paragraph? a. The ghost was murdered with poison.
b. The ghost said he was Hamlet's father.
c. The ghost asked Hamlet to avenge him.
d. Hamlet wasn't frightened of the ghost. This sentence using vague language and requires revision. What is the best way to revise this sentence?

a) Polonius can't be trusted, because he spies on his son.
b) Polonius said that he trusted Laertes, but he sent a spy named Reynaldo to keep watch on his son all the same.
c) Laertes was told by Polonius that he could be trusted, but his father had other plans in the form of a spy named Reynaldo.
d) Polonius, who was Laertes' father, lied to his own son, and sent a spy named Reynaldo to spy on him. HSA Review Polonius told Laertes that he trusted him, but he wasn't being entirely honest because he sent a man named Reynaldo to spy on him and report back to him. In line 4, the phrase "as 'twere a thing a little soil'd" modifies:

a) the working
b) a fetch of wit
c) these slight sullies
d) my son HSA Review Marry, sir, here's my drift;
And I believe, it is a fetch of wit:
You laying these slight sullies on my son,
As 'twere a thing a little soil'd i' the working, Mark you,
Your party in converse, him you would sound,
Having ever seen in the prenominate crimes
The youth you breathe of guilty, be assured
He closes with you in this consequence 1. Why does Polonius want Reynaldo to spy on Laertes?

2. Why does Polonius believe that Hamlet is acting strange?

3. What reasons does Ophelia provide as evidence of Hamlet's strange behavior?

4. What are three personality traits we could use to characterize Polonius?

5. Why does Polonius decide to go speak with the king? Selection Quiz Re-read Hamlet's "Oh that this too too sullied flesh would melt" soliloquy. Many readers have observed that Shakespeare's plays are actually written as giant poems.

Which text feature most clearly identifies this speech as a poem?

A. it uses a regular rhyme
B. it uses of a fixed number of syllables per line
C. it features a soliloquy
D. it identifies dramatis personae Warm-Up BCR Is the ghost actually Hamlet's father or is it a devil from hell?
Write a BCR and use evidence from the text to support your answer!

Also: Have stamp sheets and rough drafts ready for review. REACTIONS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? QUESTIONS FACTS Let's read and recap
II.ii using our QFR chart II.ii Dramatis Personae Claudius
Gertrude
Rosenkratz
Guildenstern Polonius
Voltimand
Hamlet
First Player In Act II, scene ii, Claudius says: I entreat you both,
That, being of so young days brought up with him,
And sith so neighbour'd to his youth and havior,
That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court
Some little time: so by your companies
To draw him on to pleasures, and to gather,
So much as from occasion you may glean,
Whether aught, to us unknown, afflicts him thus,
That, open'd, lies within our remedy. In this passage "entreat" most nearly means:

a. reward
b. delight
c. invite
d. condemn HSA Review In Hamlet, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern first appear in Act II, Scene 2, where they attempt to place themselves in the confidence of Prince Hamlet, their childhood friend. The smooth and courtly language they employ immediately establishes them as sycophants. In reality, however, they serve as spies for the corrupt King Claudius, Hamlet's uncle, who usurped the throne and constantly attempts to check his nephew. Hamlet welcomes them as "excellent good friends", but, seeing through their guise, comments that they won't "deal justly" with him about their mission. Realising that he lacks allies except for Horatio, Hamlet gives a well-known speech on depression to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. The main idea of this passage is:

a. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Hamlet's old friends.
b. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are corrupt.
c. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are not to be trusted.
d. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are sycophants. HSA Review Which of the following would not be an appropriate caption for this photograph? a) In II.ii, audiences meet Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, two of Hamlet's oldest friends from college.

b) Rosencrantz and Guildenstern knew Hamlet from childhood.

c) King Claudius invites Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to Elsinore to keep a close watch on Hamlet.

d) Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are two of Hamlet's oldest foes.
HSA Review In Act II, scene ii, Gertrude says: Thanks, Guildenstern and gentle Rosencrantz:
And I beseech you instantly to visit
My too much changed son. Go, some of you,
And bring these gentlemen where Hamlet is. In this passage "instantly" modifies:

a. you
b. beseech
c. visit
d. my son ROSENCRANTZ
Both your majesties
Might, by the sovereign power you have of us,
Put your dread pleasures more into command
Than to entreaty.

GUILDENSTERN
But we both obey,
And here give up ourselves, in the full bent
To lay our service freely at your feet,
To be commanded.
HSA Review The tone of these speakers is best described as:

a) confrontational
b) powerless
c) accomodating
d) calculating FAIR WARNING Act II.ii is the LONGEST scene in the entire play! For that reason, everyone should chart a total of 15 items of evidence from this scene. 5 Questions
5 Facts
5 Reactions that means } think of this scene as five mini-scenes wrapped into one. Pass your quizzes forward at this time. Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5 Claudius and Gertrude greet a series of visitors. Polonius reveals what he believes is the cause of Hamlet's behavior. Hamlet arrives and starts acting really weird in front of Polonius. Hamlet reconnects with his friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. A group of actors arrives in Elsinore. Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
I will be brief: your noble son is mad:
Mad call I it; for, to define true madness,
What is't but to be nothing else but mad?
But let that go. In Act II, scene ii, Polonius says: In this passage "brevity" is acting as a(n):
a. modifier
b. noun
c. verb
d. article HSA Review HSA Review Line five of this passage makes use of the poetic device known as:
a. iambic pentameter
b. assonance
c. consonance
d. all of the above In Act II, scene ii, Polonius says: But farewell it, for I will use no art.
Mad let us grant him, then: and now remains
That we find out the cause of this effect,
Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
For this effect defective comes by cause:
Thus it remains, and the remainder thus. The best definition for the word "faithful" in this case is:

a. obedient
b. loyal
c. true to a task
d. religious HSA Review Queen Gertrude: Good madam, stay awhile, I will be faithful. Came this from Hamlet to her? Polonius: To what does the word "thy" refer?

a. Lord Hamlet b. prince c. young mistress d. star What might you think? No, I went round to work,
And my young mistress thus I did bespeak:
'Lord Hamlet is a prince, out of thy star;
This must not be:' and then I precepts gave her,
That she should lock herself from his resort,
Admit no messengers, receive no tokens.
Which done, she took the fruits of my advice;
And he, repulsed--a short tale to make--
Fell into a sadness, then into a fast,
Thence to a watch, thence into a weakness,
Thence to a lightness, and, by this declension,
Into the madness wherein now he raves,
And all we mourn for. HSA Review Consider the following lines spoken by Polonius: a. absent-minded
b. cruel At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him:
Be you and I behind an arras then;
Mark the encounter: if he love her not
And be not from his reason fall'n thereon,
Let me be no assistant for a state,
But keep a farm and carters. HSA Review Which word would the playwright most likely use to describe Polonius as he speaks these lines? c. calculating
d. delusional a. from frightened to confused
b. from concerned to bewildered
c. from satisfied to angry
d. from discontented to elation Which of these best describes the mood change in this scene once Hamlet arrives and the King and Queen depart? HSA Review [Aside] How say you by that? Still harping on my
daughter: yet he knew me not at first; he said I
was a fishmonger: he is far gone, far gone: and
truly in my youth I suffered much extremity for
love; very near this. I'll speak to him again.
What do you read, my lord? Polonius: HSA Review In line six of this passage, which word is used as a modifier? a. do
b. you
c. read
d. my a. pun
b. onomatopoea
c. slant rhyme
d. enjambment In this excerpt, the word "conception" can either mean "understanding" OR it can mean "pregnant." This is a literary device known as a(n): Hamlet: Let her not walk i' the sun: conception is a
blessing: but not as your daughter may conceive.
Friend, look to 't. HSA Review Polonius: [Aside] Though this be madness, yet there is method
in 't. Will you walk out of the air, my lord? In this passage, to what does the words "in 't" refer?

a. method
b. there
c. this
d. madness HSA Review Hamlet:

a. confused
b. redundant
c. defiant
d. sarcastic HSA Review You cannot, sir, take from me any thing that I will
more willingly part withal: except my life, except
my life, except my life. What is the tone of Hamlet's reply? Polonius: My honourable
lord, I will most humbly take my leave of you. HSA Review Judging from this passage, the playwright would most likely describe Hamlet as: I have of late--but
wherefore I know not--lost all my mirth, forgone all
custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily
with my disposition that this goodly frame, the
earth, seems to me a sterile promontory, this most
excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave
o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted
with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to
me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason!
how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how
express and admirable! in action how like an angel!
in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the
world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me,
what is this quintessence of dust? a. longwinded
b. delusional
c. disenchanted
d. laconic Hamlet: In this passage, "foil" most nearly means: He that plays the king shall be welcome; his majesty
shall have tribute of me; the adventurous knight
shall use his foil and target; the lover shall not
sigh gratis; the humourous man shall end his part
in peace; the clown shall make those laugh whose
lungs are tickled o' the sere; and the lady shall
say her mind freely, or the blank verse shall halt
for't. What players are they? Hamlet: HSA Review a. metal
b. medal c. sword
d. opponent Many critics have suggested that Shakespeare deliberately stretched out the scenes immediately following Hamlet's decision to seek revenge on the king in order to heighten the overall dramatic tension of the work as it builds to a point of no return.

This portion of the story is known as: HSA Review a. exposition
b. rising action
c. climax
d. falling action HSA Review Which of these terms best expresses a theme of Hamlet (so far)? a. murder
b. step fathers
c. uncertainty
d. confusing HSA Review a. Ros and Guil told Hamlet that a group of actors were coming to Elsinore.
b. Ros and Guil tried to cheer Hamlet up.
c. Ros and Guil were sent for by the King.
d. Ros and Guil are Hamlet's old friends. Read this student essay then fill in the blank with the missing sentence: Hamlet started acting crazy. Claudius wanted to have someone spy on Hamlet to see why. _____________________. The two men asked Hamlet why he was acting so strange all of the sudden. a. The Rugged Pyrrhus
b. Hecuba
c. The Mobled Queen
d. The Murder of Gonzago Which play to the actors say that they will agree to perform on the following night? HSA Review I have heard
That guilty creatures sitting at a play
Have by the very cunning of the scene
Been struck so to the soul that presently
They have proclaim'd their malefactions;
For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak
With most miraculous organ. HSA Review The best definition of the "malefactions" is:

a) grandest dreams
b) happiest wishes
c) most ambitious hopes
d) evilest deeds We are about to listen to Hamlet reveal his innermost thoughts while standing alone on the stage. This dramatic technique is called: HSA Review a) personification
b) soliloquy
c) stage directions
d) denouement Revise this sentence to a more informal tone:

a) Plays are awesome. I can't wait to kill Claudius.
b) Plays are where it's at. Claudius is going down.
c) I'll use the play to trick Claudius into revealing himself.
d) The play will serve to reveal the despot's evil machinations. "The play's the thing
Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king!" HSA Review Horatio Friends of Prince Hamlet Other Folks Old
Fortinbras Marcellus,
Francisco, and
Bernardo Young
Fortinbras is the father of... Elsinore Castle Please turn in your Act I QFR charts. You will get them back at the start of our next class. At this time, please create a new QFR chart for Act II. Please turn in your Act II QFR charts. You will get them back at the start of our next class. At this time, please create a new QFR chart for Act III. Warm Up Hamlet has made up his mind to kill King Claudius -- so what's up with the whole "crazy" act?

Do you think that Hamlet is wise to bide his time, or should he just get on with it already!?

Defend your answer in a BCR! Quick MINI Lesson: The Five Act Structure Shakespearean plays always follow the five act structure! Act I:
Act II:
Act III:
Act IV:
Act V: Exposition
Rising Action
Turning Point
Falling Action
Resolution REACTIONS Warm-Up BCR What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Act III FACTS QUESTIONS HSA Review Let's read and recap
III.i using our QFR chart Is the ghost actually Hamlet's father or is it a devil from hell?
Write a BCR and use evidence from the text to support your answer!

Also: Have stamp sheets and rough drafts ready for review. Polonius
Ophelia
Hamlet Claudius
Gertrude
Rosenkratz
Guildenstern III.i Dramatis Personae HSA Review Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
Affront Ophelia:
Her father and myself, lawful espials,
Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen,
We may of their encounter frankly judge,
And gather by him, as he is behaved,
If 't be the affliction of his love or no
That thus he suffers for. In this passage, the word "affront" most nearly means:

a) offend
b) encounter
c) bestow
d) enrage Calling one's self a "lawful espial" is a classic example of a(n):

a) pun
b) alliteration
c) paradox
d) simile Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
Affront Ophelia:
Her father and myself, lawful espials,
Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen,
We may of their encounter frankly judge,
And gather by him, as he is behaved,
If 't be the affliction of his love or no
That thus he suffers for. HSA Review paradox = a word or statement that fundamentally disagrees with itself.

(example: "lawful spy") To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. Brace yourself for... the most famous soliloquy in all of literature! HSA Review My honour'd lord, you know right well you did;
And, with them, words of so sweet breath composed
As made the things more rich: their perfume lost,
Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
There, my lord. In this passage, the word "these" is acting as a:
a) noun c) modifier
d) simile d) verb a) embittered to estranged
b) amused to enraged
c) confused to contented
d) nostalgic to dejected As Hamlet repeats the phrase "get thee to a nunnery," the mood of the scene shifts from: HSA Review HSA Review Go to, I'll no more on't; it hath
made me mad. I say, we will have no more marriages:
those that are married already, all but one, shall
live; the rest shall keep as they are. To a
nunnery, go. The phrase "all but one" likely refers to:
a) Ophelia
b) Claudius
c) Hamlet
d) Polonius Selection Quiz 1. Why does Hamlet order Ophelia to "get thee to a nunnery?"

2. What are "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune?"

3. What evidence in this scene suggests that Hamlet is sane?

4. What evidence in this scene suggests that Hamlet is insane?

5. Did Hamlet ever truly love Ophelia? Defend your answer! What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? FACTS III.ii Dramatis Personae REACTIONS Let's read and recap
III.ii using our QFR chart QUESTIONS What is the effect of calling this adaptation of "The Murder of Gonzago" "The Mouse-Trap?" a. it is designed to catch mice
b. it is a clever metaphor
c. it is a more modern name
d. it is a confusing name HSA Review What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite (all students) QUESTIONS III.iii Dramatis Personae What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? REACTIONS Let's read and recap
III.iii using our QFR chart FACTS What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite (all students) Quickwrite (all students) QUESTIONS FACTS III.iv Dramatis Personae Let's read and recap
III.iv using our QFR chart What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? REACTIONS King Hamlet Claudius Queen Gertrude Prince Hamlet Polonius Laertes Family is the father of... remarried to... parents of... Horatio Friends of Prince Hamlet Other Folks Old
Fortinbras Marcellus,
Francisco, and
Bernardo Young
Fortinbras is the father of... Elsinore Castle Please turn in your Act III QFR charts. You will get them back at the start of our next class. At this time, please create a new QFR chart for Act IV. Act 1v IV.i Dramatis Personae What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Let's read and recap
IV.i using our QFR chart FACTS REACTIONS Quickwrite (all students) QUESTIONS What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? FACTS IV.ii Dramatis Personae Let's read and recap
IV.ii using our QFR chart What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Quickwrite (all students) REACTIONS QUESTIONS At the end of Act III, Hamlet gave his mother TWO pieces of advice. What two things did he warn his mother to do or not to do? Warm-Up HSA Review Hamlet's tone in this scene can best be described as:

a. gleeful
b. embittered
c. paranoid
d. curious Take you me for a sponge, my lord?

In this sentence, the word "sponge" is acting as a(n):
a. subject
b. modifier
c. object
d. verb HSA Review HSA Review Ay, sir, that soaks up the king's countenance, his
rewards, his authorities. But such officers do the
king best service in the end: he keeps them, like
an ape, in the corner of his jaw; first mouthed, to
be last swallowed: when he needs what you have
gleaned, it is but squeezing you, and, sponge, you
shall be dry again. This passage is an example of a(n):
a. onomatopoeia b. metaphor
c. simile d. slant rhyme What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Let's read and recap
IV.iii using our QFR chart Quickwrite (all students) FACTS REACTIONS Hamlet
Rosencrantz
Claudius IV.iii Dramatis Personae QUESTIONS What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Analysis Quickwrite Why is England a vital part of Claudius' plan? What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? FACTS REACTIONS Hamlet
Rosencrantz
Fortinbras
Captain What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? IV.iv Dramatis Personae Let's read and recap
IV.iv using our QFR chart QUESTIONS Quickwrite (all students) Let's read and recap
IV.v using our QFR chart What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? QUESTIONS FACTS Quickwrite (all students) REACTIONS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Check for Understanding How do you think that Ophelia feels now that her boyfriend (who was just banished) killed her dad (who was using her and spying on her)? And what about Laertes? IV.v Dramatis Personae QUESTIONS What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? FACTS Quickwrite (all students) REACTIONS What do I have?
What are important from this scene?
What are your to this scene? Let's read and recap
IV.vi using our QFR chart IV.vii Dramatis Personae Special instructions (for TODAY only): There are a TON of scenes in Act IV, but many of them are incredibly short. Accordingly, you will need to create a QFR chart containing a total of 25 items from Act IV, but you will not need any set number of items from any one particular scene. PS: All Quick-Writes for today's class will be shared out VERBALLY. You are encouraged to write your notes down as we continue reading today, but we will not devote extended time for quick-writing or note-taking. Our GOAL: Finish reading ALL of Act IV (seven scenes!) You will get them back at the start of our next class. Please turn in your Act IV QFR charts. At this time, please create a new QFR chart for Act V. Act v Laertes
Priest
Gertrude
Claudius V.i Dramatis Personae What is he that builds stronger than either the mason, the shipwright, or the carpenter? The Gravedigger's Riddle: Why did Hamlet jump into Ophelia's grave? Did Hamet ever really love Ophelia? Dramatic Irony Occurs when we, the audience, know more about a situation than a character who is in that situation. Special instructions (for TODAY only): There are just TWO scenes in Act V, but they are among the most famous in all of literature. Accordingly, you will need to create a QFR chart containing a total of 25 items from Act V, but you will not need any set number of items from any one particular scene. Quick-Write Analysis Quick Write Osric
Hamlet
Horatio
Lord Claudius
Gertrude
Laertes
Ambassador
Fortinbras
V.ii Dramatis Personae
Full transcript