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Digestion System

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Cracker Jacks

on 2 November 2012

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Transcript of Digestion System

Digestion Prezi Salivary Glands Tongue Epiglottis Esophagus Trachea Stomach The esophagus is the tube that carries food, saliva, and liquids from your mouth to your stomach. The esophagus is about 8 inches long, it runs behind the trachea and the heart. Large muscular sac connected to the small intestine and its function is to mix and churn food for further breakdown. The salivary glands are located in and around your mouth and throat. These glands produce the saliva that keeps your mouth moist, prepares food for digestion, and keeps your teeth clean. The epiglottis is a flap of cartilage that is in the throat behind the tongue that opens up to allow food and liquid passage down the esophagus, and covers up the larynx so food and drink don't go down your windpipe. The trachea, or windpipe, is a tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air. It is located at the front of the neck and connects the mouth and nose to the lungs. By Jack Landis, Patrick Halloran, Jack Corrigan, and Christian Talbot The tongue is a muscle attached to the floor of the mouth. It is covered by the lingual membrane which detects different types of taste. On the surface of the tongue are small nodules called papillae. These give the tongue a tough, rough texture. At the sides of the tongue are the taste buds. Also the tongue is in the mouth so this is where the food is starting to be digested by the saliva. Gall Bladder Small oval sac connected to the small intestine that releases bile into the small intestine when fat is present in the duodenum. Liver The liver is connected to the kidneys and converges potentially dangerous nitrogen gas into less toxic urea. 1. Epiglottis
2.Salvary Glands
3. Gallbladder
4. Liver
5. Pancreas
6.Small Intestine
7. Esophagus
8. Stomach
Small Intestine
9. Large Intestine
10. Rectum
11.Anus Small Intestine Large Intestine The large intestine absorbs water and some vitamins produced by bacteria. It also prepares waste for elimination from the body through the anus. Long sausage like cord connected to the large intestine that helps with chemical digestion and absorption of food through the projections villi, that are covered with a microvilli. Nutrients enter as broken down molecules through the villi and enter the bloodstream. This is done by enzymes breaking down larger molecules too big to enter the bloodstream have to be broken down. For example: glucose into starch, protein into amino acids. these new chemicals then flow into the bloodstream. Pancreas The pancreas is a glandular organ in the digestive system. Its enzymes help to further break down the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids in the small chime. The conversion of foodstuff to energy and various body processes produces excess compounds that cannot be used by the body. They must be removed or else the body will become toxic. The process of excretion involves finding and removing waste materials produced by the body. Rectum The rectum acts as a temporary storage site for feces. The rectum is the final portion of the large intestine in some mammals, and the gut in others. When the rectum becomes full, the increase in intrarectal pressure forces the walls of the anal canal apart, allowing the fecal matter to enter the canal. The rectum shortens as material is forced into the anal canal and peristaltic waves propel the feces out of the rectum. The internal and external sphincter allow the feces to be passed by muscles pulling the anus up over the exiting feces. The feces are eliminated through the anus. Mouth The mouth is the first step of digestion. It is where the process of chewing and mechanical digestion starts to break down food and enzymes such as salivary lipase and amylase also start to chemically break down the food. Salivary Glands Produces saliva that keeps the mouth moist and ready for digestion Tongue Food starts to be digested by the saliva in chemical digestion Esophagus Carries the food down to the stomach Stomach Mixes and churns the food for further digestion Liver Converges potentially dangerous nitrogen gas into less toxic urea Small Intestine Helps chemical digestion and absorption of food through villi Large Intestine The large intestine absorbs water and some vitamins produced by bacteria. It also prepares for elimination from the body through the anus Helps further break down the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids Pancreas Rectum Food is stored and then exited through the rectum as feces Gallbladder Releases bile into the small intestine when fat is present in the duodenum.
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