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Iroquois Confederacy Project 1

The first of the Iroquois Confeceracy project.

Austin Sarker

on 4 March 2013

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Transcript of Iroquois Confederacy Project 1

Timeline 2013 1142 1722 2011 2012 Map 0 + - = 9 8 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 c Great law of peace "The Iroquoian system, expressed through its constitution, "The Great Law of Peace," rested on assumptions foreign to the monarchies of Europe: it regarded leaders as servants of the people, rather than their masters, and made provisions for the leaders' impeachment for errant behavior. The Iroquois' law and custom upheld freedom of expression in political and religious matters, and it forbade the unauthorized entry of homes. It provided for political participation by women and the relatively equitable distribution of wealth." Longhouses This is the Easter egg for this prezi.............. Iroquois Confederacy How did the Iroquois live? Longhouses are long and narrow bark covered houses that the Haudenosuanee (People of the Longhouse), also known as the Iroquois, lived in until the latter part of the 1800's. These homes contained one large extended family. All the women and children living in a longhouse were of the same clan. Longhouses had two doors and no windows. One door was located on each end of the longhouse. Numerous longhouses in an area created a village. The village was sometimes protected from intruders by a palisade (an 18 ft. tall wooden fence). The Haudenosaunee planted gardens around their homes. They planted foods like corn, beans, and squash. They also hunted game and birds, they fished, and they gathered wild plants, berries, seeds, and nuts. How did the Iroquois live? The Iroquois tribes were divided into groups called clans. Clans were family groups – mothers, fathers, children, grandparents, aunts and uncles who related to one another. Each clan could trace its ancestry to a single woman. Each clan governed itself and each clan also joined with the other clans in governing the village and the tribe. Clans worked together to provide shelter and food. Children of the clan grew up as brothers and sisters and remained members of their clan for life. Each village consisted of clans with such names as Bear, Wolf, Deer, Turtle, Beaver, Hawk and Eel. LIFE The Iroquois Confederacy was formed. Tuscarora joined the Iroquois Confederacy.
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