Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Academic Vocabulary and Close Reading

Academic Vocabulary and Close Reading
by

Stephanie Moore

on 20 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Academic Vocabulary and Close Reading

Presented by,
The Network Team
2/21/2013 Academic Vocabulary
& Close Reading To take a deeper look at Shift 6 by examining sections of the NYS CCSS (Academic Vocabulary) Objectives Shift 1: Balance of Fiction and Non-Fiction (p-5)

Shift 2: Building Knowledge in the Disciplines (6-12)

Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity

Shift 4: Text- Based Answers

Shift 5: Writing from Sources

Shift 6: Academic Vocabulary Standards Modules Using Close Reading to Understand Vocabulary Doug Fischer Article- Jigsaw activity and share Additional Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary Resources To use a variety of reading/ listening strategies to address academic vocabulary with a particular emphasis on close reading. Difficulty of textbooks
9-12, including AP texts
Science texts comparable to the average newspaper for adults The 6 ELA Shifts Students constantly build the vocabulary they need to access grade level complex texts.
“By focusing strategically on comprehension of pivotal and commonly found [Tier 2] words (such as “discourse,” “generation,” “theory,” and “principled”) and less on esoteric literary [Tier 3] terms (such as “onomatopoeia” or “homonym”), teachers constantly build students’ ability to access more complex texts across the content areas.” Shift 6: Academic Vocabulary "The level of our secondary students is languishing because kids are not reading what they need to be reading" Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using adjectives and adverbs to describe (e.g., When other kids are happy that makes me happy). 2 1 K L Standard 2.6 Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because). 1 K L Standard 1.6 Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts. K L Standard K.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate
conversational, general academic, and domain- specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them). 3 2 1 K L Standard 3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic, and domain- specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition). 5 4 3 2 1 K L Standard 5.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic, and domain- specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation). 4 3 2 1 K L Standard 4.6 L Standard 6-8.1 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain- specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 K K 1 K 1 2 K 1 2 3 K 1 2 3 4 K 1 2 3 4 5 K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Can’t they just use context?
•Directive
–She caught a quick glimpse, or peek, of the criminal as he ran away
•Non-directive
–The cottage sat next to the lake.
•Mis-directive
–“She looks so poised and graceful on the stage,” she said seethingly.
•Incidental
- Teacher: "If your behavior continues, you will receive a consequence." Close Reading Video 15 minutes:
Read the article, Advancing Our Students' Language and Literacy; The Challenge of Complex Texts by Marilyn Jager Adams (pages 5-11)
This is a first read, so feel free to annotate and create whatever supports you need to sustain and support your reading of the text
10 minutes:
Reread the article
Focus this time on finding evidence in the text to support the answers to the questions on the worksheet
7 minutes:
Discuss the questions with your table

12 minutes:
Four A's Protocol

5 minutes:
Share your AHAs Grade 1
Domain 2: Fables and Stories

Activity
Directions:
Conduct a Close Read of Lesson #9:
“The Tale of Peter Rabbit”
Answer the questions below, supplying evidence from the Lesson to support your answer(s):

1) Which vocabulary words were highlighted/bold in the Read Aloud?

2) Which Tier 2 word(s) does the State deem important to hone in on for this lesson?

3) Why do you think the State does not have you go into more detail with the other vocabulary words assigned …or do they?

4) Model: Close Listening The Tale of Peter Rabbit
As you continue through the lesson, ask yourself:
Where is vocabulary that is related to instructional outcomes evident in the lesson? How much instructional time is given to this vocabulary?

Where is vocabulary that is text specific evident in the lesson? How much instructional time is given to this vocabulary?

What would be the reason for the time allotted to each? Investigating a 3rd Grade Lesson in the Common Core Curriculum
Investigate how this lesson addresses vocabulary instruction:
As you review the lesson vocabulary for Module 3A: Unit 1, Lesson 4 (Identifying Character Traits: A Study of Tinker Bell), what do you notice about the vocabulary words chosen for the lesson? Investigating a 3rd Grade Lesson in the Common Core Curriculum “Never doubt that a small group of committed people can change the world, indeed it is the only thing that ever has.”
-Margaret Mead Students should…. Be Actively Involved in Independent Reading

“Research has shown that children who read even ten minutes a day outside of school experience substantially higher rates of vocabulary growth between second and fifth grade than children who do little or no reading.”




Anderson & Nagy, 1002, p.46 Students should…. Be actively involved in instruction

Be taught strategies for learning new words independently.

Be introduced to words in “families” so that semantic and structural relationships among the words are made EXPLICIT.

Be provided with MULTIPLE opportunities for students to interact with new vocabulary Semantic Feature Analysis Semantic Mapping Frayer Model SO……

How Can We Teach Word Meaning Effectively? Encourage Deep Processing:

Which word goes with fabulous- okay or super?
Why does super go with fabulous:
Is it fabulous if you fall and scrape your knee?
What would it be?
Maria thought her car was fabulous because…
The family had a fabulous time at the park.
How could a family have a fabulous time?
When have you had a fabulous time?
Is a masterpiece fabulous? Why?
The concert was the best he had ever heard. Every note seemed perfect. Am I talking about fabulous or discover? Vocabulary Instructional Strategies
I am going to name some things. If you think they are ferocious say “that’s ferocious.” If it doesn’t sound ferocious say nothing.
A hungry lion
A loud thunderstorm
A spring rain
A kitten’s meow
Ms. ________ when she’s angry Vocabulary Instructional Strategies There is no connection between the student and the dictionary definition.

The definition is out of context.

Often times the students don’t know the meanings of the words in the definition.

Example:
Ally: one associated with another Why Dictionaries Can Be Ineffective Frayer Model Serpent Non- examples Examples Worm Long
Scaly
Legless
Slithery
Scary Cobra
Python
King
Copperhead Animal

Reptile

Snake
What is it? What is it like? Linear Arrays Janet Allen, Words, Words, Words, 1999 obscure cloudy opaque translucent transparent lazy idle ambivalent motivated eager boiling hot tepid cool icy
(Degrees between two related words) Linear Arrays What do you know about the average reading level of the daily newspaper? Vocabulary
Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction by Isabel Beck, Margaret McKeown and Linda Kucan.
www.engageny.org

Close Reading
Notice and Note, by Kylene Beers and Robert E. Probst
Videos:
https://vimeo.com/58540086
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w9v6-zUg3Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhGI5zdjpvc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvx70BTew9E
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ho_ntaYbL7o
http://engageny.org/resource/close-reading-strategies-with-informational-text-by-expeditionary-learning Resources Thank you... Words Their Way: word study for phonics, vocabulary and spelling instruction by Bear, Invernizzi, Templeton, Johnston BREAK...
Full transcript