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How a Bill Becomes a Law

Lesson Plan for a 12th Grade US Government Class
by

Rafael Concepcion

on 24 October 2014

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Transcript of How a Bill Becomes a Law

How a Bill Becomes a Law
Introduction
Key Vocabulary
Key Vocabulary
Debate
Pigeonholed
Rider
Quorum
Filibuster
Cloture Rule
Veto
Pocket Veto
Veto Override
Pigeonholed
The term referred to a bill that is buried or dies in committee. These bills are put away, never to be acted upon.

Quorum
The smallest number of people who must be present at a meeting in order for decisions to be made. In the House of Reps. 218 members must be present.
Debate

The formal discussion of a motion before a deliberative body according to the rules of parliamentary procedure
Filibuster
An attempt to "talk a bill to death." It is a stalling tactic by which a minority senator or senators seek to delay or prevent Senate action on a measure.

Cloture Rule
The cloture rule–Rule 22–is the only formal procedure that Senate rules provide for breaking a filibuster. Under cloture, the Senate may limit consideration of a pending matter to 30 additional hours of debate. 60 senators must vote to invoke cloture.
Veto
The procedure established under the Constitution by which the President refuses to approve a bill or joint resolution and thus prevents its enactment into law.
Pocket Veto
The Constitution grants the President 10 days to review a measure passed by the Congress. If the President has not signed the bill after 10 days, it becomes law without his signature. However, if Congress adjourns during the 10-day period, the bill does not become law
Veto Override
Congress can override a veto, if and only, both chambers vote by a two-thirds majority to pass the bill.
Agenda
Bell Work
Key Vocabulary
Discussion
Group Activity
Exit Slip
Lesson Goal
I will be able to understand the legislative process of "How a Bill Becomes a Law," so that when I am given primary documents, I will correctly classify the ten steps of the legislative process with 100% accuracy.

Essential Question
What steps does a successful bill follow as it moves through the Congress?
Bell Work
School House Rock Video
Scale
Steps in the Legislative Process
Desire for legislation to be law
Constituents, lobbyists, members of congress, the President, and other members of the executive branch can propose a law.
Pre-step
Step 1
Bill Introduced in the House
It must be introduced by a member of Congress. It is given a title, short summary, number Hxxx or Sxxx, and read on the house floor.
Step 2
Committee Action
The bill is assigned to a standing committee for study, hearings, revisions, and approval. Most bills never leave the committee process-Pigeonholed.
Step 3
Rules Committee
In the House of Representatives the Rules Committee sets conditions for debate and amendment process (Rider) on the floor.

Rider

An additional provision added to a bill or other measure under the consideration by a legislature, having little connection with the subject matter of the bill.
Step 4
Floor Action
The bill is debated, then passed or defeated, if passed, it goes to the Senate and the process starts again.
Step 5
Introduced in Senate
Similar process to the House of Representatives.
Step 6
Committee Action
Similar to the House of Representatives-Sometimes more than one committee may hold hearings and create revisions on the proposed bill.
Step 7
Floor Action
Debated, then passed or defeated.
The filibuster and cloture rule can be enacted at this stage in the process.
Step 8
Conference Committee
Conference Committee resolves differences between the House and Senate versions of a bill. It is made up of members from both chambers of Congress. The committee comes up with a final draft of the bill.
Step 9
Congressional Approval
House and Senate vote on final passage. Approved bill sent to the President.
Step 10
Presidential Action
The President signs or vetoes the bill. The President can use the pocket veto strategy. A vetoed bill returns to Congress for a potential override.
Check Understanding
On one side of the cue card answer one of the following questions.
A. How does the legislative process enable the House and Senate to test ideas before they become law?
B. In what ways does understanding the legislative process factor into voter's opinions in favor of or against incumbent candidates?
Group Activity
In your groups match and list the 10 steps to the 10 primary source documents. As you analyze documents, arrange them in the order that they were created during the legislative process. The documents in this activity are not in chronological order. Nor are they related to one house of Congress or one specific bill; rather, they span more than 200 years of congressional history.
Filibuster/Cloture Video
Use the cue card to rate yourself on the following scale:
4
.
You could teach someone else about the legislative process with 100% accuracy.
3. You understand the legislative process.
2. You would need some guidance in order to understand the legislative process.
1. You, even with guidance, do not understand the legislative process.

Scale
Use

the cue card to rate yourself on the following scale:
4. You could teach someone else about the legislative process with 100% accuracy.
3. You understand the legislative process.
2. You would need some guidance in order to understand the legislative process.
1. You, even with guidance, do not understand the legislative process.
Exit Slip
Use the cue card to answer, at least one, of the following questions.
a. Write one thing you learned today.
b. Write one question you still have about today's lesson.
c. How could you use today's lesson in the real world.
Ten Steps
1. Desire for legislation is voiced
2. Bill is introduced and referred to committee
3. Committee collects testimony and information
4. Committee reports to full chamber
5. Floor debate
6. Vote on bill
7. Process is repeated in other chamber
8. House and Senate bills are reconciled in a conference
9. Act sent to President
10. President signs act

Conclusion
Group Activity Answers
1.
5
2.
7
3.
4
4.
3
5.
1
6.
6
7.
9
8.
2
9
.8
10.
10
Textbook pg. 354
What steps does a successful bill follow as it moves through the Congress?
Essential Question Review
Full transcript