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Ethical Vs. Unethical

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Leisa Premdas

on 15 October 2014

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Transcript of Ethical Vs. Unethical

Students' Corner
INTRODUCTION
How would you feel if a romantic prospect abruptly stopped dating you because he/she found out that you did not make as much money has him/her? Sounds shallow? Far-fetched? Apparently not. Deborah Siegel in “The New Trophy Wife” says that this business of demanding financial compatibility (or superiority really) prior to dating and even marriage has become a trend in our society and she lays out very practical reasons for this position. Backed by input from economists, the argument appears to be sound. But is this position even ethical? Your task is define the term ethical in-depth and in your own words; then, present an argument in defense of your position on the issue. But how do you do that in a convincing way? Well, you must first embark upon a journey of discovery about what an argument really consists of and how exactly to appeal to your audience before you can write that compelling argument that wins every time. This WebQuest is designed to help you do just that.
Your ultimate task is to draft a very persuasive essay to support your stand on the above issue. In the process of preparing for your essay, you will have various "fulfillment pieces" along the way to help ensure that you are on the right track. You will post your answers to our Blackboard discussion board based on the schedule provided in slide 4; however, please submit the essay as an assignment on BB and not a discussion post.
TASK
a.
Activity 1
: Examples of each of the elements of the simple argument, “Cats Make Better Pets than Dogs.”
Due: 2/20/13
b.
Activity 2, Step 1
: Representation of the appeals in your list of 10.
Due 2/20/13
c.
Activity 3
: Completion of the To Kill a Mockingbird Worksheet.
Due 2/27/13
d.
Activity 4
: Identification and rationale for emotional appeals in popular film
. Due 2/27/13
e.
Activity 5, Step 1
: Emotional Appeals in Commercials
. Due 3/13/13
e.
Activity 6, Step 1
: Identification and rationale for specific emotional appeals in King’s “I Have a Dream."
Due 3/6/13
g.
Activity 7
: Write a persuasive essay on the topic outlined in Activity 6: Step 2.
Due 3/13/2013
ACTIVITY DUE DATES
Step 1
: Get in groups of 4. Group work activity will begin at Activity 6.
Step 2
. Review “Argument and Persuasion” in Chapter 13 of your text, The Bedford Reader.
Step 3
: Using a very simple thesis of “Cats Make Better Pets than Dogs,” provide an example of each of the following elements of argument and persuasion as explained in the chapter and in class. Post on BB and respond briefly to a peer's posting.
1.Claim 2.Reason(s) 3.Evidence 4.Objection 5.Reply

Step 4
: Click on the following links to see examples of various types of evidences as discussed in your text.
a.http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/melatonin-sabotaging-your-sleep-pt-1 (Opinions of Authority)
b.http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/5-Numbers-That-Can-Save-Your-Life/1 (Primary Sources)
c. – “I’ve Got Something To Say” (at 2 min. marker) (Personal Experience)
PROCESS
Activity 2: Appealing Emotionally
Activity 1: The Parts of An Argument
start here
PROCESS
As you learned in Chapter 13, there are different ways to manipulate the evidence in order to get at the mind or heart of the audience. For our purposes, we will concentrate heavily on appealing to the “heart,” the seat of the emotions (persuasion), while integrating hardcore evidence that appeals to the mind/the intellect/the rational (argument).

Step 1:Pretend that you are between six and fifteen years old and you are walking with your parents in the mall. Upon seeing a gift you absolutely must have, write down 10 things you would say to convince him or her to give you that gift. Post your list on BB and respond to a peer's posting.

Step 2:
a. Research Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs by reviewing the links below.
http://psychology.about.com/od/theoriesofpersonality/a/hierarchyneeds.htm
http://www.businessballs.com/images/maslow_hierarchy.htm
http://smallbusiness.chron.com/description-marketers-can-use-maslows-hierarchy-needs-39333.html

b.Based on Maslow’s theories, there are 15 needs or areas of importance in a person’s life. These areas lead to the emotional appeals. To persuade effectively, identify these areas of importance to your target audience and appeal on the basis of that need.
1.Fear -- using a threat as a means of motivating your target audience to side with what you are saying.
2.Sympathy -- making the audience feel sympathetic toward a cause to make them side with the claim
3.Hero worship -- using a respected figure to endorse the claim you are making
4.Health -- citing the health benefits of siding with a claim in order to win your audience’s approval
5.Revulsion -- fostering feelings of disgust within the audience to cause them to agree with you
6.Deferring to wisdom -- citing the opinions of a respected figure to help solidify your claim
7.Sex -- promoting/promising/alluding to sexual intimacy as a means of motivating your audience
8.Gender/race -- promoting the claim based on associations/benefits to gender/race
9.Religion -- Using God and His moral laws and overall will for our lives to engage and motivate the audience to side with the claim
10.Shame and Guilt -- evoking feelings of shame and guilt with the audience for your purposes
11.Companionship -- promoting the benefits of companionship and togetherness as a reason for accepting the claim
12.Loyalty -- Using dedication to an entity or person as a reason for siding with a claim.
13.Humor -- Using comical scenarios/levity to distract/pacify the audience to win their approval
14. Saving Money -- Highlighting the financial values that will result from siding with the claim
15.Freedom and Independence -- Citing liberty/responsibility/independence that is an anticipated benefit to accepting the writer/speaker’s viewpoints.
Activity 2: List of Emotional Appeals
PROCESS
PROCESS
ACTIVITY 3: IDENTIFYING EMOTIONAL APPEALS IN CLASSIC FILMS
Step 1: Analyze the list of reasons you drafted in Activity 2, Step 1 and determine which of the emotional appeals above you used in order to convince your parents. For example, a reason of “If you buy it for me, I’ll eat all my vegetables” would be an appeal to health. That is, because health is an important subject to your parents, you were able to convince them to buy you the gift on the basis that you would eat your vegetables and, in essence, be healthier. Likewise, a reason of “if you don’t buy it, I’ll tell daddy you are having an affair,” would appeal to fear. Post on Blackboard. Respond to a peer's posting.

Step 2:Watch the following clips from To Kill a Mockingbird and complete the questionnaire provided in class (also in slide 9). Post on Blackboard.
#1
#2
#3
#4
1.Atticus gives REASONS to support HIS CLAIM that his client, Tom Robinson is not guilty of the crime of raping and beating Mayella. What are they?
2.What REASONS does Atticus’ OPPONENTS (witnesses for the State) give to support THEIR CLAIM that Tom Robinson is guilty?
3.What argument does Atticus make to OBJECT TO or REBUT their claim? Separate it into a) his claim and b) his reasons for his claim.
4.Re-emphasizing one’s claim after a rebuttal is crucial! Where does Atticus return to his original claim?
5.Of the 15 emotional appeals (sex, gender, loyalty, health, fear, shame and guilt, companionship, revulsion, freedom and independence, hero worship, deferring to wisdom, humor, sympathy, religion, and saving money), which ones did the author use to appeal to his audience emotionally in an attempt to win them over to his claim? Give a rationale for your answer in no less than 250 words. Post on Blackboard and respond to a peer's posting.
PROCESS
Activity 3: To Kill a Mocking Bird Questionnaire
Watch the following closing arguments in
two
popular films. State which emotional appeal was used by the lawyer to convince the jury to side with him and his client. Provide a detailed rationale for your answers in no less than 250 words. Respond to a peer in a small paragraph.

A TIME TO KILLhttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117913/plotsummary

AND JUSTICE FOR ALL
https://myspace.com/poggy5/video/...and-justice-for-all-al-pacino/47510729
PROCESS
Activity 4: Emotional Appeals in Popular Films
PROCESS
Step 1
: Review the following Superbowl commercials and identify the emotional appeals in them. State the claim, reasons, and which appeals are present. Post on BB.
Step 2
: Find one other commercial you like and post. A print ad is fine too. Be sure to state the claim, reasons, and which appeals are present. Respond to a peer’s posting.
Step 1: Found in your text, Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is considered one of the greatest persuasive pieces ever written due to King’s graceful integration of many of the emotional appeals in order to impact his audience on a emotional level. Each member of your group must read the speech carefully. It may be easier to listen to his speech as you follow along in your text.

Step 2: a) You will identify the following: 1) King’s purpose for writing the speech; 2) King’s target audience and how that affects the speech; 3) King’s claim; 4) King’s reasons in support of his claim. You can assign one element to each team member if you wish.

b) Locate the paragraph(s) in the speech you feel best the following emotional appeals: FEAR, SHAME AND GUILT, HERO WORSHIP, AND SYMPATHY. Each team member is responsible for only ONE of the appeals and will 1) indicate the paragraph(s) of choice and provide a rationale in no less than 250 words for selecting said paragraph(s). Again, collaborate for accuracy. Post parts (a) and (b) as one group.
PROCESS
Activity 6: Identifying Emotional Appeals in Print/Speech
Step 1: Review the Youtube clips on “How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay”

Step 2: Essay Instructions
Deborah Siegel in “The New Trophy Wife” lays out very practical reasons why people are currently demanding financial compatibility with potential mates prior to dating them. Backed by input from economists, her argument seems sound. But is this position even ethical? Define the term ethical in-depth and in your own words; then, present your argument in defense of your position on the issue.
Write a 4+ page persuasive essay on the proposed topic to convince your readers of the validity of your position.
oThe essay must be double-spaced with 1-inch margins on each side and is intended for inclusion in a lifestyle magazine, such as Essence Magazine, The New Yorker, or O! Magazine.
oThe essay must include an integration of evidence from external sources (see rubric) complete with MLA citations and a Works Cited Page.
oOne or more emotional appeals must be included so that your essay can be very convincing.
oClick on the “Evaluation” tab to review essay rubrics.
oThe essay and all the fulfillment pieces for this project are due on March 13th.
PROCESS
ACTIVITY 7: WRITING THE ESSAY
You will need the following to successfully participate in the WebQuest and write your persuasive essay.

1.A solid understanding of basic essay writing (intro, thesis sentences, conclusion, topic sentences, etc.)

2.A solid understanding of how to quote and cite using MLA format.

3.A copy of the handout, “The New Trophy Wife” by Deborah Siegel

4.A copy of The Bedford Reader, 11th Edition written by X.J. Kennedy, Dorothy M. Kennedy, and J.E. Aaron and published by Bedford-St. Martins. Available in the campus bookstore or any bookstore, including Amazon.com

5.Access to the internet via some type of electronic device

6.Access to a word-processing device. Documents should be submitted in .doc or .docx formats ONLY.
RESOURCES
Your thesis will be evaluated based on the SUNY Standards of Communication Rubric below.

A. Thesis and Purpose [ 2 points ]
Writer presents an easily identifiable, focused, original, and thought-provoking, controlling purpose or thesis. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer presents an Identifiable and focused controlling purpose or thesis (Meets standards) 2
Writer presents a wandering, vague, unfocused, or unfulfilled controlling purpose or thesis. (Approaches standards) 1
Writer fails to present a controlling purpose or thesis; consequently it is difficult to identify exactly what the thesis is. (Does not meet standards) 0
B. Coherence, Unity, and Logic [ 2 points]
Writer moves coherently, logically, and even creatively from an engaging introduction to a well-demonstrated conclusion. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer moves coherently and logically from a satisfying introduction to a solid conclusion. (Meets standards) 2
Writer moves awkwardly from a weak introduction to a conclusion that does not adequately represent the body of the paper. (Approaches standards) 1
Writer moves from an unsatisfactory introductory paragraph to an ending that does not serve as a conclusion, thus conveying the sense that much of what has been presented is unresolved. (Does not meet standards) 0
C. Using Quotations/Other Sources (2 points )
Writer blends information and language from other sources coherently, logically, even gracefully, into his or her own thinking and prose. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer blends information and language from other sources coherently and logically into his or her own thinking and prose. (Meets standards) 2
The essay’s blending of information and language from other sources into the writer’s own thinking and prose is awkward. (Approaches standards) 1
The writer’s attempt to blend information and language from other sources into his or her own thinking and prose significantly undermines the essay’s coherence and logic. (Does not meet standards) 0
D. Organization, Development, and Support [2 points]
Paragraphs fit within this structure coherently and present pertinent details, examples, and evidence to support central and subsidiary ideas. (All ideas are substantial and very relevant to the author’s position.) (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Paragraphs fit within this structure and present details, examples, and evidence to support the ideas presented. (Ideas are explained sufficiently and most are relevant.) (Meets standards) 2
Basic paragraphing exists, but support for a central idea may be inconsistent, and the sequence of ideas may occasionally be awkward. (Most ideas are not explained well and are not relevant.) (Approaches standards) 1
Basic paragraphing exists, but often fails to support or even recognize a central idea, and the use of evidence and examples is inadequate. (Ideas are not relevant or explained well.) (Does not meet standards) 0
E. Support [1 point]
Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases, or arguments and has provided 2 counter-arguments (Exceeds standards) 1.5
Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided 1 counter-argument (Meets standards) 1
Includes 2 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. (Approaches standards) .5
Includes 1 or less piece of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. (Approaches standards. (Does not meet standards) 0
F. Word Choice and Diction [ 1 point]
The essay exhibits a solid command of word variety and a tone and diction appropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Exceeds standards) 1.5
The essay exhibits some degree of control over the tone and diction appropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Meets standards) 1
Tone and diction are often inconsistent and/or inappropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Approaches standards) .5
Diction, tone, and word choice are not appropriate for the subject or for the implied audience. (Does not meet standards) 0
G. Works Cited Page & In-Text Citation [ 1 point ]
Works Cited Page exhibits a solid command of the format associated with the most recent MLA Citation Guide and complies wholly with in-text citation formatting rules (Exceeds standards) 1.5
Works Cited Page exhibits substantial knowledge concerning MLA & in-text citation formatting (Meets standards) 1
Works Cited Page contains some errors, displaying minimal degree of knowledge concerning MLA & in-text citation formatting (Approaches standards) .5
Essay displays blatant ignorance concerning MLA & In-text formatting rules and/or no Works Cited Page exists (Does not meet standards) 0

GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS --------------------------------------------------------
H. Sentence Structure and Transitions
Sentence structure displays sophistication and variety; transitions add to the logical development of the topic. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
For the most part, sentences are well constructed and transitions are sound. (Meets standards) 2
Sentence and paragraph transitions are often unclear, awkward, indirect, and/or illogical. (Approaches standards) 1
Sentence structure is often awkward and transitions are ineffectual and/or abrupt or simply missing. (Does not meet standards) 0

I. Grammar and Mechanics [2 points]
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are nearly flawless. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are mostly accurate. (Meets standards) 2
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are not well executed and may, at times, obscure meaning. (Approaches standards) 1
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) disrupt reading and often obscure meaning. (Does not meet standards) 0
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

PART 5: THE SCORE (marked out of 15)
Just think about it. This financial compatibility dating issue is real. Siegel said it herself: it is a trend. Your persuasive essay will help millions who are on the verge of a making a big mistake, whether that means allowing a relationship and love to blossom and grow or disallowing it. What you bring to the table could be crucial, not only for this generation, but for the generation to follow. In other words, you are now part of history.
CONCLUSION
This project was designed to arm freshman college-level students with the tools to argue effectively while providing them a subject matter that will motivate them to write. Most of us who write know that we write more freely when we have something of interest to us. For this reason, I have come up with a list of hot topics that evoke passion within my students and cause them to want to put their feelings down on paper. The dating subject is one of them.

Most of us understand argument from a very logical perspective: we know what we want to say and we pile on the different forms of evidence. Nothing is wrong with that really. Technically, it is correct, and we need to do it on some level. But in our daily lives, we argue more from an emotional perspective than any other. We argue from the standpoint of what is important to us. We argue from the standpoint of what we need, would like to see, would like to have. And although we do not recommend arguing only from an emotional standpoint, we do encourage a nice blending of the emotional appeal and the rational appeal for greater effect, thus, the impetus behind my teaching persuasion via the avenue of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. If students can identify what they think would be of importance to the audience they are targeting, they stand a greater chance of impacting them on a level that will move them (the audience) toward agreement and ultimate action.
INTRODUCTION
Objective - Upon successful completion, students will be able to do the following. Outcomes will be measured by one or more of the following:

•Write and revise essays for content, form and style. This outcome is measured by a minimum of 4000 words (equivalent to 16 typed, double-spaced pages of final draft essays), which may be accomplished through several shorter documented essays [3-4 pages in length] or one or two longer documented essays [5-8 pages in length].
7,000 words total for all writing, including the formal and informal, drafts, and final copies of essays

•Appreciate writing as a process
•Use and incorporate (teacher and peer) feedback, and strengthen the ability to edit own writing with efficiency
•Maintain fluency in sustained writing on one topic
Measured by a minimum of 4000 words (equivalent to 16 typed, double-spaced pages of final draft essays), which may be accomplished through several shorter documented essays [3-4 pages in length] or one or two longer documented essays [5-8 pages in length];
7,000 words total for all writing, including the formal and informal, drafts, and final copies of essays

•Read and demonstrate an understanding of published and student texts by identifying core ideas, articulating personal responses to these ideas in writing and discussion, and supporting these responses through reference to the text
•Read a variety of texts with the intention of noticing choices that were made by the writer and reading like a writer
Measured by formal and informal writing, class discussions, oral presentations, essays, and final assessment (Note: responses and other informal writing may bring total to 7000 words or more)

•Express informed opinion, summarize, draw inferences from and synthesize ideas and information from written sources
•Distinguish between facts and opinion
•Refine and shape an original thesis statement•Identify and develop a counter argument or a counter thesis.
Measured by formal and informal writing, group work, class discussions, oral presentations, final assessment, and essays, including at least two documented essays -- three or more pages in length with a minimum of three sources and following MLA format. Also measured by a minimum of 4000 words (equivalent to 16 typed, double-spaced pages of final draft essays), which may be accomplished through several shorter documented essays [3-4 pages in length] or one or two longer documented essays [5-8 pages in length]
7,000 words total for all writing, including the formal and informal, drafts, and final copies of essays

•Develop critical and creative thinking skills.
•Develop intellectual curiosity; to know how to question
Measured by formal and informal writing, group work, class discussions, oral presentations, final assessment, and essays

•Gather and evaluate primary and secondary sources, paraphrase, quote, cite and document where appropriate in their writing
•Research and use documentation while still maintaining their own voice (develop a point of view)
•Use the MLA style
Measured by a minimum of 4000 words (equivalent to 16 typed, double-spaced pages of final draft essays), which may be accomplished through several shorter documented essays [3-4 pages in length] or one or two longer documented essays [5-8 pages in length]
7,000 words total for all writing, including the formal and informal, drafts, and final copies of essays

•Acknowledge diverse opinions and have a respectful attitude toward others
•Write in varied rhetorical forms and in forms appropriate for other disciplines
•Write for a variety of purposes
Measured by formal and informal writing, group work, class discussions, oral presentations, essays, and informal writing assignments.

•Contribute to a constructive learning environment
Measured by good attendance, active participation, on-time submission of assignments, and adhering to general expectations for classroom conduct

•Apply digital technologies to compose digitally
•Apply digital technologies to gather and critically evaluate information
Measured by formal writing in print or online, online logs and bulletin boards, online peer review or information sharing, and research essays that include valid online sources.
STANDARDS
EVALUATION
LEARNERS
This lesson was designed for Composition and Literature (a.k.a. English 101 or Introduction to College Writing) students at the college level. These are typically freshmen. Modified to some degree, it could also meet New York State’s English Language Arts Standards for Grade 12.
RESOURCES
Students will need the following to successfully participate in the WebQuest and write the persuasive essay.
1. A solid understanding of basic essay writing (intro, thesis sentences, conclusion, topic sentences, etc.)
2. A solid understanding of how to quote and cite using MLA format.
3. A copy of the handout, “The New Trophy Wife” by Deborah Siegel
4. A copy of The Bedford Reader, 11th Edition written by X.J. Kennedy, Dorothy M. Kennedy, and J.E. Aaron and published by Bedford-St. Martins. Available in the campus bookstore or any bookstore, including Amazon.com
5. Access to the internet via some type of electronic device
6. Access to a word-processing device. Documents should be submitted in .doc or .docx formats ONLY.
PROCESS
Please see process slides 5 through 13 in "The Student Corner"
Teachers' Corner
No it's not!!!!
It's ethical!
EVALUATION
CONCLUSION
S
o, there you have it. A fun, very involved way to help students learn not just how to persuade, but how to persuade passionately and effectively by mixing "heart" (emotional appeals) and "head," (the rational appeal by way of evidence) using a topic of interest that that does half the job for them!
Your thesis will be evaluated based on the SUNY Standards of Communication Rubric below.

A. Thesis and Purpose [ 2 points ]
Writer presents an easily identifiable, focused, original, and thought-provoking, controlling purpose or thesis. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer presents an Identifiable and focused controlling purpose or thesis (Meets standards) 2
Writer presents a wandering, vague, unfocused, or unfulfilled controlling purpose or thesis. (Approaches standards) 1
Writer fails to present a controlling purpose or thesis; consequently it is difficult to identify exactly what the thesis is. (Does not meet standards) 0
B. Coherence, Unity, and Logic [ 2 points]
Writer moves coherently, logically, and even creatively from an engaging introduction to a well-demonstrated conclusion. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer moves coherently and logically from a satisfying introduction to a solid conclusion. (Meets standards) 2
Writer moves awkwardly from a weak introduction to a conclusion that does not adequately represent the body of the paper. (Approaches standards) 1
Writer moves from an unsatisfactory introductory paragraph to an ending that does not serve as a conclusion, thus conveying the sense that much of what has been presented is unresolved. (Does not meet standards) 0
C. Using Quotations/Other Sources (2 points )
Writer blends information and language from other sources coherently, logically, even gracefully, into his or her own thinking and prose. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Writer blends information and language from other sources coherently and logically into his or her own thinking and prose. (Meets standards) 2
The essay’s blending of information and language from other sources into the writer’s own thinking and prose is awkward. (Approaches standards) 1
The writer’s attempt to blend information and language from other sources into his or her own thinking and prose significantly undermines the essay’s coherence and logic. (Does not meet standards) 0
D. Organization, Development, and Support [2 points]
Paragraphs fit within this structure coherently and present pertinent details, examples, and evidence to support central and subsidiary ideas. (All ideas are substantial and very relevant to the author’s position.) (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Paragraphs fit within this structure and present details, examples, and evidence to support the ideas presented. (Ideas are explained sufficiently and most are relevant.) (Meets standards) 2
Basic paragraphing exists, but support for a central idea may be inconsistent, and the sequence of ideas may occasionally be awkward. (Most ideas are not explained well and are not relevant.) (Approaches standards) 1
Basic paragraphing exists, but often fails to support or even recognize a central idea, and the use of evidence and examples is inadequate. (Ideas are not relevant or explained well.) (Does not meet standards) 0
E. Support [1 point]
Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases, or arguments and has provided 2 counter-arguments (Exceeds standards) 1.5
Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided 1 counter-argument (Meets standards) 1
Includes 2 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. (Approaches standards) .5
Includes 1 or less piece of evidence (facts, statistics, primary sources of opinion, personal experience, etc.) that support the position statement. (Approaches standards. (Does not meet standards) 0
F. Word Choice and Diction [ 1 point]
The essay exhibits a solid command of word variety and a tone and diction appropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Exceeds standards) 1.5
The essay exhibits some degree of control over the tone and diction appropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Meets standards) 1
Tone and diction are often inconsistent and/or inappropriate for the subject and its implied audience. (Approaches standards) .5
Diction, tone, and word choice are not appropriate for the subject or for the implied audience. (Does not meet standards) 0
G. Works Cited Page & In-Text Citation [ 1 point ]
Works Cited Page exhibits a solid command of the format associated with the most recent MLA Citation Guide and complies wholly with in-text citation formatting rules (Exceeds standards) 1.5
Works Cited Page exhibits substantial knowledge concerning MLA & in-text citation formatting (Meets standards) 1
Works Cited Page contains some errors, displaying minimal degree of knowledge concerning MLA & in-text citation formatting (Approaches standards) .5
Essay displays blatant ignorance concerning MLA & In-text formatting rules and/or no Works Cited Page exists (Does not meet standards) 0

GRAMMAR AND MECHANICS --------------------------------------------------------
H. Sentence Structure and Transitions
Sentence structure displays sophistication and variety; transitions add to the logical development of the topic. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
For the most part, sentences are well constructed and transitions are sound. (Meets standards) 2
Sentence and paragraph transitions are often unclear, awkward, indirect, and/or illogical. (Approaches standards) 1
Sentence structure is often awkward and transitions are ineffectual and/or abrupt or simply missing. (Does not meet standards) 0

I. Grammar and Mechanics [2 points]
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are nearly flawless. (Exceeds standards) 2.5
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are mostly accurate. (Meets standards) 2
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) are not well executed and may, at times, obscure meaning. (Approaches standards) 1
Mechanics (grammar, punctuation, spelling and documentation, if needed) disrupt reading and often obscure meaning. (Does not meet standards) 0
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

PART 5: THE SCORE (marked out of 15)
Full transcript