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Changes to the Red River Settlement: 1860-1870

Chapter 4--The Northwest to 1870

Dana Huff

on 22 February 2011

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Transcript of Changes to the Red River Settlement: 1860-1870

More immigration
Attracted to the rich soils/small population
Canada--now a country
Hudson's Bay Company starting to decline
many Protestants and
members of Orange Order move to Red River
violently anti-French,
anti-Catholic movement
prejudiced against Metis
"Dr." John Schultz
businessman in Red River
general store
newspaper owner
politician--created the Canadian Party
his anti-Metis editorials caused tension in Red River
Economic Problems of the 1860s
frequent crop failures
bison disappearing from prairies
HBC losing interest in area
Metis hadn't made legal claim to their territory
Red River Settlement: Changes between 1860-1870
Canada purchases Rupert's Land
1867-68, Can. govt. and HBC began negotiations to transfer control of Rupert's Land
HBC--did NOT consult the people in the Red River Settlement
This made Metis uneasy...
1869-Rupert's Land+North Western Territory
= North-West Territories
Canada doubled in size, HBC received $1.5 million, 2.8 million hectares of farmland, and right to continue the fur trade
surveyors were already in Red River laying out the grids of townships, without recognizing the seigneurial pattern of farms
Full transcript