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The Masque of the Red Death

This presentation gives a paragraph-by-paragraph analysis of the literary terms in "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe.
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Stephanie D

on 6 November 2017

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Transcript of The Masque of the Red Death

The Masque of the
Red Death
Animation of "The Masque of the Red Death"
Paragraph # 1
THE "Red Death" had long devastated the country.
No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous.
Blood was its Avatar and its seal --the redness and the horror of blood.
There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with dissolution. The scarlet stains upon the body and especially upon the face of the victim, were the pest ban which shut him out from the aid and from the sympathy of his fellow-men. And the whole seizure, progress and termination of the disease, were the incidents of half an hour.
Paragraph # 2 Summary

SUMMARY OF PARAGRAPH #2: Prince Prospero is the RICHEST man in the country and instead of utilizing his wealth to HELP the subjects of his kingdom, he LOCKS his doors. Prospero is ignorant and does not address the CONCERNS of his people.
Prince Prospero
Summary of Paragraph #3 & 4
Quotation:
"The world could take care of itself. In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think. The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure" (Poe 1).
Six months into their seclusion within the castle walls, Prince Prospero decided to hold a ball. The wealth of the kingdom is utilized to provide entertainment and diversions for the prince while the peasants are perishing.
Prince Prospero
At the End of the Story
After many months of seclusion Prospero hosts a whimsical masquerade for his guests. Each room is decorated in one solid color, and each appears mythical as well as dream-like, except for the black-red room. Most guests avoid this room because of the ominous atmosphere. Prospero does not spare any expense when planning the party, and he as well as his guests have a wonderful evening, until midnight. Then a mysterious guest arrives and he is dressed as if he has been infected by the Red Death. This angers Prospero, and he confronts the intruder in the black-red room where he is killed. Prospero's death, as well as the deaths of his companions, is a punishment. The prince is insensitive and abandons his subjects in their hour of need in order to save himself. He greedily utilizes his resources and money for unnecessary and frivolous purchases. Instead, he could have extended his wealth to his whole kingdom and they could have united against the plague. Unfortunately, Prospero is selfish. Also, he attempts to cheat death by secluding himself. He believes that he can escape the epidemic if he distances himself and uses his resources. But, people cannot outsmart death, no matter how rich they are. These are two important lessons that Prospero's death teaches.
Prince Prospero
At the End of the Story
Quotation:
"And Darkness and Decay and the Read Death held illimitable dominion over all" (Poe 4).
Prospero's magnificent masquerade concludes with the death of all of his guests. The prince is the first to die after he confronts the mysterious guest. This guest is death. When the prince's friends approach they realize that there is not a person underneath the costume, because death is not a person. Prospero's death teaches a lesson. This is because the prince attempts to outsmart death, but death is inescapable. It is stated that the plague held "illimitable dominion", or complete power, over the masquerade. This closing line proves the true power of death, and that death cannot be halted. Even a rich man like Prospero cannot escape it. Because death is inevitable, he should have been less selfish and attempted to aid his entire kingdom. His demise proves that he would have to die either way, so his seclusion and lavish parties were in vain. In the end, death will always conquer all, because death touches every human being.
"The Masque of the Red Death" Movie Trailer
Overall Change
Prince Prospero
All in all, Prospero is made an example in this story. He is proof that death is all powerful and inevitable. In the beginning, he believes he can fend off the plague by retreating into his castle with his rich peers. He is not concerned with the well-being of his loyal subjects, he is extremely self-centered. This is why he meets his demise at his masquerade. Instead of aiding the less fortunate people in his kingdom the prince decides to host a lavish ball for himself and his close companions. Because he is the prince, he feels superior and that he cannot contract the disease. In his mind, he can cheat death. But his demise demonstrates the fact that superiority and wealth cannot prolong life or fend off death. Death is inevitable and inescapable. Also, Prospero's death is a punishment. He and all of his friends deserve to die at the hands of the Red Death because they abandoned the rest of the kingdom. Their deaths are a form of punishment for insensitivity. Overall, Prospero proves that death is unavoidable as well as the fact that arrogance and selfishness can lead to negative consequences.
Setting
Annotations
for Paragraph # 1
Basic Premise of the Story (Exposition):
"Red Death is ravaging the country, killing many people.
Symbol:
Prince Prospero represents wealth, since his name is similar to the word prosperity
Connection to Poe's Life:
Many people in his life, including his wife, mother, and step-mother died of Tuberculosis, a disease that made one cough up blood (and the sign of the "Red Death" is blood coming out of one's pores)
Vocabulary to know:
Avator:
An old spelling of "avatar", an incarnation in human form.
dissolution:
death
Pestilence:
a fatal epidemic disease, especially bubonic plague.
Summary of Paragraph # 1
The "RED DEATH," a fictional disease in real life, is an epidemic in the country right now, KILLING much of the population and spreading rapidly. The symptoms of the disease are sharp PAINS, CONFUSION of the mind, and BLEEDING from the pores before the disease KILLS the person in 30 minutes.
Paragraph # 2
But the
Prince Prospero was happy and dauntless and sagacious.
When his dominions were half depopulated, he summoned to his presence a thousand hale and light-hearted friends from among the knights and dames of his court, and with these retired to the deep seclusion of one of his castellated abbeys.
This was an extensive and magnificent structure, the creation of the prince's own eccentric yet august taste. A strong and lofty wall girdled it in. This wall had gates of iron. The courtiers, having entered, brought furnaces and massy hammers and welded the bolts. They resolved to leave means neither of ingress or egress to the sudden impulses of despair or of frenzy from within.
The abbey was amply provisioned. With such precautions the
courtiers might bid defiance to contagion. The external world could take care of itself.
In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think. The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure. There were buffoons, there were improvisatori, there were ballet-dancers, there were musicians, there was
Beauty
, there was
wine. All these and security were within. Without was the "Red Death."
Annotations for Paragraph # 2
Direct Characterization:
(tells the audience what the personality of the character is) "Prince Prospero was happy and dauntless and sagacious."
Indirect characterization:
(when the narrator SHOWS the reader something about the character through the character's actions, things the character says, or things other characters say) Prince Prospero was seflish, because when most of his kindgdom was being killed by a disease, he ignored his people's problems and thought he would let the outside world take care of itself. He instead was worried about himself and his friends, locking themselves in the castle to avoid the disease.
Symbol:
The welded gates of the castellated abbey represent man's efforts to prevent death.
Dauntless:
Sagacious:
having or showing keen mental discernment and good judgment; astute.
August:
respected and impressive
Annotations for Paragraph # 2 Continued
Annotations for Paragraph # 1 continued
Allegory: (always operates on two levels of meaning: the literal elements of the plot and their symbolic counterparts, which often involve large philosophical concepts )
The "Red Death" is a fictional disease that could represent the Black Plague that ravaged the European population in the 14th century during Medieval times.
Allegory:
Feudalism is represented by the wealthy classes (Knights and Nobles) locking the poor (peasants and serfs) out of the opportunity to own land. This locking in of social classes is represented literally in the story by the rich people, Prince Prospero and the knights and dames, locking the poor out of the castle to take care of themselves against the deadly disease.
http://www.history.com/topics/black-death
Paragraph # 3 & 4 (part 1)
It was toward the close of the
fifth or sixth month of his seclusion,
and while the
pestilence
raged most furiously abroad, that the
Prince Prospero entertained his thousand friends at a masked ball of the most unusual magnificence.

It was a voluptuous scene, that masquerade. But first let me tell of the rooms in which it was held.
There were seven --an imperial suite.
In many palaces, however, such suites form a long and straight vista, while the folding doors slide back nearly to the walls on either hand, so that the view of the whole extent is scarcely impeded.
Here the case was very different; as might have been expected from the duke's love of the bizarre. The apartments were so irregularly disposed that the vision embraced but little more than one at a time.
There was
a sharp turn at every twenty or thirty yards
, and at each turn a novel effect. To the right and left, in the middle of each wall, a tall and narrow Gothic window looked out upon a closed corridor which pursued the windings of the suite.
Annotations for Paragraph # 3 & 4 (part 1)
Setting:
Prince Prospero's castle in the imperial suite, which housed 7 rooms.
Allegory:
The layout of the rooms could represent how one can only be in one stage of life at a time, and no one knows what lies around the corner in one's life. It is through a variety of rights of passage (novel effects) that one passes to the next stage of life.
I
ndirect Characterization:
Clearly, Prospero is narcissistic and ignorant because he believes that he has saved himself from the plague, and in the process of saving himself has left others to die.
Vista:
a pleasing view, especially one seen through a long, narrow opening.
impeded:
delay or prevent (someone or something) by obstructing them; hinder.
Paragraph # 3 & 4 (part 2)
These
windows were of stained glass whose color varied in accordance with the prevailing hue of the decorations of the chamber into which it opened.
That at the
eastern extremity
was hung, for example, in
blue
--and vividly blue were its windows. The
second chamber was purple
in its ornaments and tapestries, and here the panes were purple. The
third was green
throughout, and so were the casements. The
fourth was furnished and lighted with orange
--the
fifth with white
--
the sixth with violet
. The
seventh apartment was closely shrouded in black velvet tapestries
that hung all over the ceiling and down the walls, falling in heavy folds upon a carpet of the same material and hue. But
in this chamber only, the color of the windows failed to correspond with the decorations. The panes here were scarlet --a deep blood color.
Now in no one of the seven apartments was there any lamp or candelabrum, amid the profusion of golden ornaments that lay scattered to and fro or depended from the roof. There was no light of any kind emanating from lamp or candle within the suite of chamber
s. But in the corridors that followed the suite, there stood,
opposite to each window, a heavy tripod, bearing a brazier of fire that protected its rays through the tinted glass and so glaringly illumined the room.
And thus were
produced a multitude of gaudy and fantastic appearances.
But in the
western or black chamber the effect of the fire-light that streamed upon the dark hangings through the blood-tinted panes,
was ghastly in the extreme, and
produced so wild a look upon the countenances of those who entered,
that
there
were
few of the company bold enough to set foot within its precincts at all.
Annotations for Paragraph # 3 & 4 (part 2)
Allegory: 7 rooms could represent Shakespeare's 7 stages of man, or, in other words, the human life cycle.
1st room-Blue: Furthest to the east, or sunrise of life, represents birth. The color suggests the "unknown" from which a human being comes into the world.
2nd room-Purple: a combination of blue (birth) and red (associated with life, intensity) suggests the beginnings of growth.
3rd room-Green: suggests the "spring" of life (youth)
4th room-orange: the summer and autumn of life (adulthood)
5th room-white: suggests age – think white hair, and bones.
6th room-Violet: (a combination of purple and blue, or purple and grey) is a shadowy color, and represents darkness and death.
7th room-Black with red windows: representing death and blood
4:09-
Paragraph # 5
It was in this apartment, also, that there
stood against the western wall, a gigantic clock of ebony.
Its
pendulum swung to and fro with a dull, heavy, monotonous clang;
and when the minute-hand made the circuit of the face, and the hour was to be stricken, there came from the
brazen lungs of the clock
a
sound which was clear and loud and deep and exceedingly musical, but of so peculiar a note and emphasis that, at each lapse of an hour, the musicians of the orchestra were constrained to pause, momentarily, in their performance, to hearken to the sound; and thus the waltzers perforce ceased their evolutions; and there was a brief disconcert of the whole gay company;
and, while the chimes of the clock yet rang,
it was observed that the giddiest grew pale, and the more aged and sedate passed their hands over their brows as if in confused reverie or meditation.
But when the echoes had fully ceased, a light laughter at once pervaded the assembly;
the musicians looked at each other and smiled as if at their own nervousness and folly, and made whispering vows, each to the other, that the next chiming of the clock should produce in them no similar emotion;
and then, after the lapse of sixty minutes, (which embrace three thousand and six hundred seconds of the Time that flies,)
there came yet another chiming of the clock,
and then were
the same disconcert and tremulousness and meditation as before.
Annotations for Paragraph # 5
Symbol:
The gigantic clock of ebony represents death, or one's time being up, since it is located in the western chamber(sunset of life) in the black room with red windows.
Allegory:
Every time the clock chimes, it represents the passage of time and the nearing of death; hence, the reason the whole party becomes uncomfortable every time the clock chimes.
Personification:
"brazen lungs of the clock" is giving human traits to an inanimate object.



Annotations from Paragraph # 5 continued
tremulousness:
the state of of a person's body trembling from fear, nervousness, or weakness.
disconcert:
perturb; ruffle; make uncomfortable
Personification:
"Time" is capitalized within this paragraph, making it as if it is a proper noun, like one's name.
Paragraph # 6
But, in spite of these things, it was a gay and magnificent revel.
The tastes of the duke were peculiar.
He had a fine eye for colors and effects. He disregarded the decora of mere fashion.
His plans were bold and fiery, and his conceptions glowed with barbaric lustre.
There are
some who would have thought him mad. His followers felt that he was not.
It was
necessary to hear and see and touch him to be sure that he was not.
Paragraph # 7
(part 1)
He had directed, in great part, the moveable embellishments of the seven chambers, upon occasion of this great fete; and it was his own guiding taste which had given character to the masqueraders.
Be sure they were
grotesque
. There were much glare and glitter and piquancy and phantasm --much of what has been since seen in
"Hernani."
There were
arabesque
figures with unsuited limbs and appointments. There were delirious fancies such as the madman fashions.
There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust. To and fro in the seven chambers there stalked, in fact, a multitude of dreams.
And these --the dreams --writhed in and about, taking hue from the rooms, and causing the wild music of the orchestra to seem as the echo of their steps.
Summary of Paragraph # 5
As the party went on, an ebony clock located in the western-most chamber chimed loudly every hour, and while it chimed, everyone stopped what he or she was going and listened uncomfortably to the chimes of the clock. When it stopped chiming, they went back to celebrating. Every hour, this cycle repeated.
Annotations for Paragraph # 6
Allusion:
Prince Prospero could be an allusion for the devil, because the text says "his plans were BOLD and FIERY and his conceptions glowed with BARBARIC LUSTRE" as well as explaining that "some would have thought him mad" and "His followers felt that he was not."
Barbaric:
savagely cruel; exceedingly brutal.
Connection to Poe's life:
Some thought he was crazy and regarded him as a madman, because he wrote about such dark topics.
Summary for Paragraph # 7
The revelers were encouraged to dress uniquely. Some revelers looked beautiful and some dark and scary, but none of the costumes sparked the disgust of the prince or the crowd. As the party continued, there was a dark laugh that came from the western most chamber behind the ebony clock.
Summary of Paragraph # 6
The prince directed the revelers to wear whatever they would like since it was a masquerade party and his fashion sense was risque. Some thought the prince was crazy for his odd tastes, but his friends did not.
Annotations for Paragraph # 7
(part 1)

Grotesque:
comically or repulsively ugly or distorted.
Arabesque:
a posture in which the body is supported on one leg, with the other leg extended horizontally backward.
Allusion:
"Hernani" is a play by Frenchman, Victor Hugo, that was known for its romantic and beautiful costumes.
Personification:
"To and fro in the seven chambers there stalked, in fact, a multitude of dreams." Dreams are given the human trait of stalking.
Metaphor:
The revelers are being compared to dreams as well since they are dressed up in dream-like clothing.

Paragraph # 7 (part 2)
And, anon,
there strikes the ebony clock which stands in the hall of the velvet.
And then, for a moment, all is still, and all is silent save the voice of the clock.
The dreams are stiff-frozen as they stand.
But the echoes of the chime die away --they have endured but an instant --and a
light, half-subdued laughter floats after them as they depart.
And now again the music swells, and the dreams live, and writhe to and fro more merrily than ever, taking hue from the
many-tinted windows through which stream the rays from the tripods.
But to the chamber which lies most westwardly of the seven, there are now none of the maskers who venture; for the night is waning away; and there flows a ruddier light through the blood-colored panes; and the blackness of the sable drapery appalls; and to him whose foot falls upon the sable carpet, there comes from the near clock of ebony a muffled peal more solemnly emphatic than any which reaches their ears who indulge in the more remote gaieties of the other apartments.


Annotations for Paragraph # 7
(part 2)
Allegory:

The ebony clock striking closer to midnight signals the ending of the night, but also, the end of life.
Symbol:
The tripods of fire which light up the room represent life. When a fire is burning bright, it is lively.
Emphatic:
showing or giving emphasis; expressing something forcibly and clearly.

Paragraph # 8
But these other apartments were densely crowded, and in them beat feverishly the heart of life.
And the revel went whirlingly on, until at length there commenced the sounding of midnight upon the clock.
And then the music ceased, as I have told; and the evolutions of the waltzers were quieted;
and there was an uneasy cessation of all things as before. But now there were twelve strokes to be sounded by the bell of the clock; and thus it happened, perhaps, that more of thought crept, with more of time, into the meditations of the thoughtful among those who revelled.
And thus, too, it happened, perhaps, that before the last echoes of the last chime had utterly sunk into silence,
there were many individuals in the crowd who had found leisure to become aware of the presence of a masked figure which had arrested the attention of no single individual before.
And the rumor of this new presence having spread itself whisperingly around,
there arose at length from the whole company a buzz, or murmur, expressive of disapprobation and surprise --then, finally, of terror, of horror, and of disgust.
Paragraph # 8 Summary
The party went on happily until the clock sounded midnight. When it did, all of the people paused with more fear than they did before as they had to wait for the clock to chime twelve times. After the chiming of midnight, the crowd became aware of a person they did not know dressed disgustingly and they were all whispering about his inappropriate choice of costume.
Annotations for Paragraph # 8
Allegory:
The clock struck midnight and just as this is the signal of the end of the night, it was also signals a clue to the people that the end of their lives are nearing each time it chimes.
Disapprobation:
strong disapproval, typically on moral grounds.
Paragraph # 9
In an assembly of
phantasms
such as I have painted, it may well be supposed that no ordinary appearance could have excited such sensation. In truth the masquerade license of the night was nearly unlimited; but
the figure in question had out-Heroded Herod, and gone beyond the bounds of even the prince's indefinite decorum.
There are chords in the hearts of the most reckless which cannot be touched without emotion. Even with the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there are matters of which no jest can be made. The whole company, indeed, seemed now deeply to feel that in the costume and bearing of the stranger neither wit nor propriety existed.
The figure was tall and gaunt, and shrouded from head to foot in the habiliments of the grave. The mask which concealed the visage was made so nearly to resemble the countenance of a stiffened corpse that the closest scrutiny must have had difficulty in detecting the cheat. And yet all this might have been endured, if not approved, by the mad revellers around. But the mummer had gone so far as to assume the type of the Red Death. His vesture was dabbled in blood --and his broad brow, with all the features of the face, was besprinkled with the scarlet horror.
Paragraph # 9 Summary
The figure in question was wearing a costume that resembled someone who had contracted the Red Death. His costume was black and his face was dabbled with blood. Everyone disproved of his outfit at the party even though the other costumes were pretty crazy.
Annotations for Paragraph # 9
Allusion:
"Out Heroded Herod" is a Biblical allusion
to Herod, a man who was known for Herod to be
greatly stirred when the Magi announced the birth
of some great king in his kingdom, Jesus. He felt
threatened by another king so he ordered the
slaughter of all the children in Bethlehem, so "out-
Heroded-Herod, means he outdid even the
most evil of men.

Symbol:
The mummer, or the masque of the red
death figure, represents death.

Paragraph # 10-12
When the eyes of Prince Prospero fell upon this spectral image (which with a slow and solemn movement, as if more fully to sustain its role, stalked to and fro among the waltzers) he was seen to be convulsed, in the first moment with a strong shudder either of terror or distaste; but, in the next, his brow reddened with rage.

"Who dares?" he demanded hoarsely of the courtiers who stood near him --"who dares insult us with this blasphemous mockery? Seize him and unmask him --that we may know whom we have to hang at sunrise, from the battlements!"

It was in the eastern or blue chamberin which stood the Prince Prospero as he uttered these words.
They rang throughout the seven rooms loudly and clearly --for the prince was a bold and robust man, and the music had become hushed at the waving of his hand.
Paragraph 10-12
Summary


When the Prince Prospero saw the mummer, he got extremely angry and told his friends to grab the man so that he knew who he needed to hang in the morning for this crime. He was in the eastern-most chamber when he yelled this, or the room that represented sunrise (birth).
Paragraphs 10-12 Annotations
Symbol:
Eastern-most chamber represents
sunrise, or birth.
Spectral:
of or like a ghost.
blasphemous: profane; inappropriate.
battlements:
a parapet at the top of a wall, usually of a fort or castle, that has regularly spaced, squared openings for shooting through.
Paragraph # 13
(part 1)
It was in the
blue room
where stood the prince, with a
group of pale courtiers by his side.
At first, as he spoke,
there was a slight rushing movement of this group in the direction of the intruder,
who at the moment was also near at hand, and now,
with deliberate and stately step, made closer approach to the speaker.
But from a certain nameless awe with which the mad assumptions of the mummer had inspired the whole party,
there were found none who put forth hand to seize him;
so that,
unimpeded, he passed within a yard of the prince's person;
and,
while the vast assembly, as if with one impulse, shrank from the centres of the rooms to the walls
,
he made his way uninterruptedly, but with the same solemn and measured step
which had distinguished him from the first, through the blue chamber to the purple --through the purple to the green --through the green to the orange --through this again to the white --and even thence to the violet, ere a decided movement had been made to arrest him.
It was then, however, that the Prince Prospero, maddening with rage and the shame of his own momentary cowardice, rushed hurriedly through the six chambers,
while none followed him on account of a deadly terror that had seized upon all.
Annotations for Paragraph # 13
(part 1)
Symbol:
Blue Room represents the unknown color at the beginning of life
(birth).
Allegory:
Prince Prospero moving quickly through
the 7 different colored rooms represents him
rushing through the life cycle to his death.


Paragraph # 13
(part 2)
He bore aloft a drawn dagger, and had approached, in rapid

impetuosity,

to within three or four feet of the retreating figure, when the latter, having attained the extremity of the velvet apartment, turned suddenly and confronted his pursuer. There was a sharp cry --and the dagger dropped gleaming upon the sable carpet, upon which, instantly afterwards, fell
prostrate
in death the Prince Prospero. Then, summoning the wild courage of despair, a throng of the revellers at once threw themselves into the black apartment, and, seizing
the mummer, whose tall figure stood erect and motionless within the shadow of the ebony clock,
gasped in unutterable horror at finding the grave-cerements and corpse-like mask which they handled with so violent a rudeness, untenanted by any tangible form.
Paragraph # 13 Summary
The angry Prince Prospero lets the mummer pass right by him without pursuing him. The rest of the guests do the same, shrinking to the walls in fear. Finally, Prince Prospero grabs a dagger and pursues the mummer by running quickly through the seven different colored rooms. The mummer turns toward the Prince once in the black room with red windows and the prince falls to his death.
Annotations for Paragraph # 13
(part 2)
impetuosity:
of, relating to, or characterized by sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive.
impetuosity:
of, relating to, or characterized by sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive.
prostrate:

lying stretched out on the ground with one's face downward.
symbol:
The mummer stood in the shadow of the ebony clock (mummer and clock are symbols for death).
symbol:
The mummer stood in the shadow of the ebony clock (mummer and clock are symbols for death).
Paragraph # 14
And now was acknowledged the
presence of the Red Death
.
He had come like a thief in the night.
And
one by one dropped the revellers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel,
and died each in the despairing posture of his fall.
And the life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay.
And the
flames of the tripods expired.
And
Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.
Paragraph # 14 Summary
The Red Death killed the Prince Prospero and his guests. After they died, the ebony clock stopped and the torches outside each of the rooms went out.
Annotations for Paragraph # 14
Personification:
The Red Death is said to be present, like a person, and his presence was acknowledged at the end of the story here. Therefore, the Red death is given the trait of a human of having a presence in the room.
Irony:
The partiers died at the party that they were having to celebrate their avoidance of the red death. It is ironic that they died at this party because that is the opposite of the expectation of the readers and the people in the story.
Allegory:
The ebony clock stopped and this continues the allegory of the clock ticking the time until the revellers' deaths. When the clock stops ticking just as the people's hearts stop beating.
Symbol:
Tripods (holding fire) expiring reprsents death.
Personification:
"Darkness, Decay, and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all." This is saying that they dominated the people, like a ruler or a tyrant might dominate people.
Allusion to the Black Plague
& Allegory of the Black Plague's effect on Europe in Medieval Times
Personification of blood/disease
Paragraph # 1
THE "Red Death" had long devastated the country.
No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous.
Blood was its Avatar and its seal --the redness and the horror of blood.
There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with dissolution. The scarlet stains upon the body and especially upon the face of the victim, were the pest ban which shut him out from the aid and from the sympathy of his fellow-men. And the whole seizure, progress and termination of the disease, were the incidents of half an hour.
Connection to Poe's Life: Many people in his life, including his wife, mother, and step-mother died of Tuberculosis, a disease that made one cough up blood (and the sign of the "Red Death" is blood coming out of one's pores)
Exposition
Symbol of Wealth or PROSPERITY
Direct Characterization (Smart & determined Prince)
Symbol: The wall represents man's efforts to present death
Direct characterization: a character is described using adjectives in the text.

Indirect characterization: we learn about the characters through actions and words.
TERMS TO KNOW
Paragraph # 2
But the
Prince Prospero was happy and dauntless and sagacious.
When his dominions were half depopulated, he summoned to his presence a thousand hale and light-hearted friends from among the knights and dames of his court, and with these retired to the deep seclusion of one of his castellated abbeys.
This was an extensive and magnificent structure, the creation of the prince's own eccentric yet august taste. A strong and lofty wall girdled it in. This wall had gates of iron. The courtiers, having entered, brought furnaces and massy hammers and welded the bolts. They resolved to leave means neither of ingress or egress to the sudden impulses of despair or of frenzy from within.
The abbey was amply provisioned. With such precautions the
courtiers might bid defiance to contagion. The external world could take care of itself.
In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think. The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure. There were buffoons, there were improvisatori, there were ballet-dancers, there were musicians, there was
Beauty
, there was
wine. All these and security were within. Without was the "Red Death."
Allegory: Feudalism is represented here by the rich locking the poor out of the castle like the rich ban the poor from owning land in the system of feudalism in Medieval Europe.
Indirect Characterization:
Prince & friends are selfish
Personification of Beauty almost like she is a person in the castle.
Foreshadowing that we know NO ONE can avoid death, so it will eventually come to get them.
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