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eHITS 2015 Social Media for HCPs: Getting Started

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Tom Ying

on 6 February 2016

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Transcript of eHITS 2015 Social Media for HCPs: Getting Started

William Gibson, Quote from The Economist, Dec. 4, 2003. As presented by CIHI
The future is already here - it's just not evenly distributed.
- 80% of public believes that health means more than being disease-free.
- Individuals believe personal and social behaviours shape health most
- Social interaction is important to spread good health
- Social influence are amongst some of the top motivators for health behaviour change
Edelman, 2011.
A
B
one
two
12
21
22
Compare
11
5+7=
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
Consumer Health
Consumer Health: Personal Child Health Record (PCHR)
- May 18, 2012 - Commerical partnership with Microsoft HealthVault --> web-based electronic record (eRedbook)
-Mobile platforms for access (smartphones, tablets, latptops)
-Customizable with additional modules for special care (e.g. pre-term, down syndrome, Hep B)
-United Kingdom: PCHR (Redbook) for parents and clinicians to record child's health info (e.g. weight, height, vaccinations)
-Archived and always available (e.g. emergencies, accidents)
Sitekit, 2012.
Consumer Health: Mobile Apps
"Skin Scan" - skin cancer prevention mobile app
-Risk assessment for moles
-Archived case with images for review and re-assessment
- User empowered to take responsibility of health
-Analysis and grading of mole
-Recommends user to seek medical attention
Skinscanapp, 2012
Consumer Health: Mobile Apps
CareCoach - Audio Visit Recordings and Guidance
-Helps individuals plan, record, and review clinician visits
-Empowers individuals to be active participant with own health care
CareCoach, 2012
Social Media for Health Care Professionals: Getting Started
What is Social Media?
Social Media: Definition
References
Department of Justice (Victoria, Australia) Video for Social Media use in the workplace:

Edweek, 2010. Media. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/media/2010/06/11/dd_social.jpg

Franchaise Social Media, 2012. Retrieved from http://www.starklogic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/question-mark1.jpg

Mashable, 2012. Social Media Training. Retrieved from http://5.mshcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Social-Media-Training.jpg

Stevens, Pete. 2011. Twitter question mark.

Talent Egg, 2012. Do employers really like social media?

Social Fresh, 2012. Retrieved from http://socialfresh.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/policy-signs.jpg

Social Media revolution 2012 – Current State of Social Media

Wayne Hellmuth, 2011. Change. Retreived from http://waynehellmuth.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/change-management.jpg

Wikipedia, 2012. Social Media. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media

William Gibson, Quote from The Economist, Dec. 4, 2003. As presented by CIHI
PHC Social Media & Mobile devices: Survey Results
PHC Social Media & Mobile devices: Survey Results
PHC Social Media & Mobile devices: Survey Quotes
“...needs to have
executive support
for effective discipline for those breaching the privacy of patients and/or employees. All employees
need to know
about it before use. You can't rely on separate privacy/security policy - it needs to be
clear
within the social media policy.
In Closing...
- PHC Social Media Survey
What do you think of this?
I had a question from a student who asked about using social media (eg: face book) as a way of getting collateral information about a mental health pt (who has not yet been certified) and has not given consent to the nurse(or Dr) to access it. The student noticed that this is becoming practice.
Social Media: Risks
From PHC Social Media Policy:
-101 Ways to use Twitter in your Hospital (LPN to RN, 2012)
What are the Benefits?
(e.g. Marketing & public relations, patient relations, community and staff engagement)
-Blogs: Seattle Mama Doc
Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson- Pediatrician, blogs on behalf of Seattle's Children Hospital
Tom Ying, BSc, BSN, RN; Karen C. Li, MSN, RN
Learning Objectives
At the end of this workshop, you will be able to:
1.
Define
social media (SM)
2. List
examples
of SM in healthcare
3. Recognize the different
types
of SM in healthcare
4. Understand the
benefits
and
risks

5. Understand
ways to avoid the risks
6. Use
Twitter
and
post one
tweet
• Exchanging information (pictures, text, video)
Post-video discussion
• "On the Line" (Online)

• Financial – ideas can be worth a lot
• Participation of individuals or communities of people
• Instant
Internet-based tools that allow individuals and communities to:

Gather
and
communicate

Share
information, ideas, personal messages, images, and other content

Collaborate
with other users
Which of these do you use?
Types of Social Media
Social networking
Professional networking
Media sharing
Content production
Blogs
Microblogs
Knowledge aggregation
Virtual reality and gaming environments
Shortening of
attention spans
Social Media: General Facts
Social Media in Health Care
With advancements in technology, many things are changing in healthcare.

Communication

Interoperable Information

Time management

Workflow

Patients --> e-Patients



Profession Specific:
(e.g., Doximity, Sermo, PharmQD, ANANurseSpace, InspireNet)
Credential verified
Secure
Rich resources
Discussion groups
Alerts/notifications
Point-of-care crowd-sourcing
Profession specific
Anonymity and "no-friending"

Social Networking for HCPs:
Professional Networking
Share and learn

Debate
health care policy
and
practice issues

Promote
health behaviors

Educate and interact
with patients, caregivers, students, and colleagues

‘Going Viral’

Social Media in Healthcare: Benefits
General Purpose:
e.g., Twitter, Facebook, Blogs
Larger user base
More public/Less private
Easy to use
Free basic accounts
Some allow closed-groups
Some have private messaging

Types of Social Media in Health Care
Social networking
Professional networking
Content production
Blogs
Microblogs
Knowledge aggregation
Virtual reality and gaming environments
Participate
in online communities

Listen
to experts

Network
and
communicate
with colleagues

Connect
HCPs in other countries with specialists


• Allow for education, interactive discussions, connecting communities

Professional Education
Engagement with community and patients
Visibility
Marketing products and customer service
Activities
Promotions
Fundraising
Patient resources and education
Organizational Promotion
Patient <--> HCP
Patient portal
allows for education and monitoring of chronic diseases
Improve
behavioral changes
and
drug adherence
Improve
patient satisfaction
Considerable resistance still exists from HCPs
Possible functionality:
Prescription refill
Appointments
Alerts
Diagnostic results
Virtual visit/telehealth

Patient Care
For patients with chronic or rare/fatal diseases

Support groups for individuals with similar conditions

Fundraising
Patient Education
Used for rapid natural disaster response

Monitoring population health and outbreaks

Mass causalities

Public Health
Lots of content
Open-forum discussion
Anonymity
Maintained by an individual, a group, or an organization that posts regular entries

Blogs
Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson- Pediatrician, blogs on behalf of Seattle's Children Hospital
“Strange case today in internal medicine rotation. 16 years old boy with acute pancreatitis (for the 6th! time). Any ideas?”
Microblog
Wikipedia is the most commonly used

Accuracy and completeness?

Wikis
Media-Sharing
Optimized for viewing, sharing and embedding digital media
Virtual Reality & Gaming Environments
3D interactive worlds
Rapid growth:
Patient education
Epidemiology and mass prophylaxis
Psychotherapy
Surgery
Research

It’s NOT about technology, but the people using it.
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Author credentials?
Incorrect, unreferenced, incomplete
Emphasizes and magnifies individual patient stories
Questionable Quality of Information
Counter-Measures:
Credible
peer-reviewed
websites/apps
WHO initiative for new
health domain suffix
(e.g. dot.health)

Reflects on personality, values, priorities, and first impressions
Reflect unfavorably on employers or affiliated institutions
Background check

Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Social Media in Health Care: Risks
Damage to Professional Image
Do not post:

profanity, discriminatory language, images of sexual suggestiveness or intoxication, negative comments

Include a
disclaimer

Strict
privacy settings

Google yourself

“Would I speak in public like this?”
Counter-Measures:
De-identify
patient data:
Names, numbers, SIN, date of birth, and photos
Rare medical problems,
Specific time frames or locations
Obtain patient
consent

Avoid
non-Canadian technology/companies
FIPPA
compliant technologies and encrypted email
Breech of Patient Confidentiality
Can result in legal action, heavy fines, or criminal charges against an HCP and potentially his/her employer.
Counter-Measures:
Violate boundary even if patients initiate
Organizations discourage personal online communication
“Patient-targeted Googling”
Positive
Negative
Threaten the trust in relationships
Blurring of professional-personal boundaries

Strict
privacy settings

Read
terms of agreements
Avoid
Googling patients.
Don’t
‘friend’ patients
Counter-Measures:
Violation of Patient-HCP Boundary
Inappropriate use of SM:
Sexual misconduct
Breaches of patient privacy
Abuse of prescribing privileges
Misrepresentation of credentials
Sanctions:
Warning letters, license suspensions, or termination.
Licensing Issues
Counter-Measures:
Don’t post
inappropriate content
online
Don’t post
inappropriate content

Avoid giving
medical advice

online
Don't respond online
Schedule an appointment
Refer to emergency services
Obtain informed consent
Explain risks of online communication
Document online interactions on patient records
Legal action
Not protected by freedom of speech or privacy laws
Portrays your character - used against you in court
Facebook policy:
“We may
access, preserve
, and
share
your information in response to a legal request both
within and outside of U.S. jurisdiction

Counter-Measures:
Legal Issues
Read organizational
SM policy
Don’t
use
work email/logos

Include
disclaimer
:
“The views I share are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer.”

Disclose

conflicts of interest
Be
transparent, honest, respectful

Affect employment or disciplinary actions
Distract from patient care
Counter-Measures:
Organizational Issues
Don’t lie, don’t cheat, don’t steal, don’t reveal
Simple 8-word social media policy
In Conclusion
Social media
It is an engagement tool
Not a megaphone
When used
appropriately
, social media can be
powerful tools
to engage with others for
professional development
and better
patient care.

- Fastblink.com
References & Resources
Ventola, C. L. (2014). Social Media and Health Care Professionals: Benefits, Risks, and Best Practices. Pharmacy and Therapeutics, 39(7), 491–520.

Twitter
Getting started with Twitter
https://support.twitter.com/articles/215585-getting-started-with-twitter
Twitter Glossary – vocabularly and terminology used in Twitter
https://support.twitter.com/articles/166337-the-twitter-glossary

Forbes
31 Twitter Tips: How To Use Twitter Tools And Twitter Best Practices For Business
http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenkrogue/2013/08/30/31-twitter-tips-how-to-use-twitter-tools-and-twitter-best-practices-for-business/

Howcast Video
http://www.howcast.com/videos/149055-how-to-use-twitter/
Web 2.0 = The Internet = Social Media
Change from static web pages to
dynamic
or
user-generated
content
We declare no conflict of interest and have nothing to disclose.
UBC CPD Disclosure
We have no involvement with commercial interests.
Research
Part of professional networking

Allows for scientists/researchers to:
Connect
Share papers
Ask and answer questions
Find collaborators
Social Networking for HCPs:
Professional Networking
Media sharing
Usage has sharply
increased
Widespread societal
trends
Linked to
political events
Decline of print
media
HCP <--> HCP
Patients <--> Patients/Public
Most dynamic and concise form social media
Can support indexing for retrieval
HCPs use Twitter:
Journal Clubs
Real-time discussions

Potential for broad following
Dr. Twitter - Bertalan Meskó
HCP use:
CliniSpace, OpenSim, InWorldSolutions
HCP use:
education, community building, marketing, and branding
i.e. The Doctors’ Channel
HCP wiki:
RxWiki, Medpedia
What’s posted online
DOES
stay online
Example Tweet
Learning about types of social media from @_karenli and @ttomying at the #eHITS2015 conference!

Use the HASHTAG
#eHITS2015



Karen Li
Twitter:
@_karenli
Email:
Karen.Li@alumni.ubc.ca
Tom Ying
Twitter:
@TTomying
Email:
Tom.Ying@vch.ca
Internet Addiction
Full transcript