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Combining Sentences

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by

Jenna Felish

on 25 November 2014

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Transcript of Combining Sentences

Combining Sentences
Compound Subjects and Compound Predicates
Conjunctions
Connectors
To show contrast:
Compound Subjects
Ray is going to junior college this year.
John is going to junior college this year.
The counselors are happy with the decision.
Suzie is happy with the decision.
Ray thinks this year will be easy.
Ray's parents think this year will be easy.
Compound Predicates
Two subjects that share the same predicate.
Ray works in the mornings. Ray studies in the evenings.
Ray works in the mornings and studies in the evenings.
Sarah works for the state. She is a manager.
Sarah works for the state and is a manager.
The sun shone down on the frozen pond. It melted the ice.
The red hen sat for days on her eggs. She finally hatched 5 chicks.
My dog dug a hole in the flower bed. He buried his bone.
I studied all night for my math test and slept through the exam.
Our exploration leader tripped over a tree root and fell on the ground.
We sat together on the grassy hillside and waited for the fireworks to start.
Compound Subject
or
Compound Predicate?
Ray and John met at the school.
They were happy to see each other and were eager to start the class.
Subjects, predicates, and commas seemed difficult for them to remember.
And
adds information
But or Yet
shows contrast
So
shows cause, then effect
For
shows effect, then cause
Or
shows two alternatives
Nor
shows two negatives
Conjunctions combine related ideas into one sentence.
Brandon wanted to go skateboarding with his friends. It was raining outside.
Brandon wanted to go skateboarding with his friends, but it was raining outside.
My family lives in the country.
We have a lot of land.
My family lives in the country, and we have a lot of land.
Do you want pancakes for breakfast?
Would you rather have eggs?
Do you want pancakes for breakfast, or would you rather have eggs?
My dog was sick. I took him to the vet.
We went to the party. We forgot to bring a gift.
Ryan caught three fish. I cooked them for dinner.
I put on a heavy coat. It was cold outside.
PetSmart has already closed. The manager let me in.
Ray and John are going to junior college this year.
The counselors or Suzie is happy with the decision.
Ray nor Ray's parents think this year will be easy.
and
or
nor
Don't overuse commas!!
Use a comma with a conjunction, which joins complete thoughts.
I ran for the bus but missed it.
The car broke down on the highway and was towed.
Children are fun, and many people enjoy working with them.
Horses are farm animals, but many people keep them in cities.
No comma!
Both parts of the sentence are not complete thoughts.
Use a comma! Both parts of the sentence are complete thoughts.
however
nevertheless
instead
To add more information:
furthermore
moreover
To show cause, then effect:
therefore
consequently
Connectors join two ideas with a semicolon
Pete went fishing today; however, John went fishing yesterday.
It was raining; therefore, she took her umbrella.
The hurricane destroyed my cousin's house; furthermore, it ruined his car.
The politician is too old to be our president; moreover, he is not trustworthy.
She saw a spider. She screamed.
She saw a spider; therefore, she screamed.
She went to Hawaii. She hated it.
I wanted to go to the park. I watched a movie.
She went to Hawaii; however, she hated it.
I wanted to go to the park; instead, I watched a movie.
I love wearing earrings. The earrings I wear most are from New York.
I love wearing earrings; moreover, the earrings I wear most are from New York.
The sun shone down on the frozen pond and melted the ice.
The red hen sat for days on her eggs and finally hatched 5 chicks.
My dog dug a hole in the flower bed and buried his bone.
My dog was sick, so I took him to the vet.
We went to the party, but we forgot to bring a gift.
Ryan caught three fish, so I cooked them for dinner.
PetSmart has already closed, yet the manager let me in.
I put on a heavy coat, for it was cold outside.
Writing!
Write two short related sentences on each of the following subjects:
Food
Friends
Clothes
Rewrite the two sentences using a comma and a conjunction to join them.
He studied hard; therefore, he earns excellent grades.
Joey is a good friend of mine; however, I don’t trust him.
I understand the problem; nevertheless, I can’t seem to solve it.
Janet is my neighbor; furthermore, she is my best friend.
He studied hard therefore he earns excellent grades.
Joey is a good friend of mine however i don't trust him.
I understand the problem nevertheless i can't seem to solve it.
Janet is my neighbor furthermore she is my best friend.
Writing!
Write three sentences using connectors.
These connectors must join two related thoughts.
Writing Ideas:
Your family
An accident
Your best friend
Television
Exercise
After writing the sentences, circle the connectors and underline the complete thoughts.
Subordinating Conjunctions
Subordinating conjunctions begin a part of the sentence that is dependent upon the other part of the sentence.
because
since
cause and effect:
contrast:
though
although
condition:
if
time:
when
after
before
Sign the attendance sheet before you leave.
After Jack had fallen, Jill came tumbling down the hill.
Since it was her birthday, Sara blew out the candles.
Nick ran to the door when the doorbell rang.
The milk spoiled _________ Marshall forgot to put it back in the fridge.
_________ he is afraid of heights, Jack would not go on the roller coaster.
___________ I go outside, I must finish my chores.
We can see the grass ________ the snow melts.
Amy has a stomach ache. She ate too much ice cream.
We are going out to dinner tonight. I want to see a movie.
My dog sees something scary. He runs and hides.
I was very hungry. I did not eat my lunch.
Write!
Write 5 sentences using subordinating conjunctions.
Writing Ideas:
Your city
Your neighborhood
A vacation
Your home
Punctuation Review
Loretta pushed down the brake pedal but the truck didn't stop.
Being new in town is not easy however I have already met many people.
Because I had a long day I went to bed early.
Bob will sing at the talent show because he has a great voice.
Maria studied hard consequently she got an A on her test.
Ted works in the mornings and studies in the evenings.
The drain was clogged so Margaret called a plumber.
Review
Conjunctions
Connectors
Combine related ideas into one sentence
Punctuation:
Use a comma before the conjunction
Common conjunctions:
and, but, or, yet, so, for, nor
Drugs are a serious problem. Many teenagers think they are harmless.
Sally needed a new dress. She went shopping this morning.
His team has to win this game. Bob will lose the bet.
Punctuation:
Use a semicolon before the conjunction and a comma after
Common conjunctions:
however, nevertheless, instead, furthermore, therefore
I often lose my house keys. I lock my keys in the car at least once a week.
Steve needs a new car. He has no money.
The car's breaks are worn. The body is badly rusted.

Compound Predicates
Punctuation:
No added punctuation
Words to combine predicates:
and, or, nor
Baseball is very popular. Baseball has many fans.
Sally needed a new outfit. She bought a shirt at the store.
Josh will run tonight. Josh will watch TV tonight.
Subordinating Conjunctions
Punctuation:
If the dependent phrase is at the beginning, it is followed by a comma. Otherwise, there are no punctuation changes.
Common Subordinating Conjunctions:
though, although, if, when, after, before, because, since
Baseball is very popular. The sport has many fans.
I jumped. I heard the phone ring.
I pay my bills. I will have no money.
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