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Region 8: Eastern Visayas

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Ethel Joy Sebastian

on 8 February 2015

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Transcript of Region 8: Eastern Visayas

Waray Literature
Photos
Like A Joke That Seems True
28 likes 31 comments 0 share

Pets and lightning may strike them in Manila
But pray not here in the restaurant of Go Bani
The filthy "pansit" still delights the tongues,
Palates and throats of us here in Tacloban

Cruel! How oppressive these Manilans are
Who want their bread ad rice clean;
How unfortunate for Kim On, T'in Siugaw
They'll never get rich in the business.

We do not have their likes in Tacloban;
I've grown bleary-eyed, Stopped, white-haired since,
And we Taclobanons, whether of the towns or of the barrios,
Allow the Chinese to become millionaires.


Waray Poems
265,100 likes 53,210 comments 5,520 shares
Magpakaruruyag ngan pinili
Burak ngan tsampaka, marol nga hamili,
Rosas, asusenas, rosal nga mahambot
Nga nagangalimwag sa hangin talambot,
An ira alimyon abot na hirayo.....

Bukod ngakadam'an luob an at'tuna,
Magpakabibihag ha panhunahuna,
May walingwaling ngan may mga manna-aw.
Nga makalilipay ha mata pagtan-aw.
Magdamit Malaya, di bukad ha Mayo.

Inin tarukanga nga labi kahayaw
Ha pagkakaaga daw na naparayaw,
Bis'an katatsutsi, bisan an surangga,
May hamo't may dagway nga sadang ibangga:

Di'an mapakatdo lain nga ibayo,
Damo an bukad ta ha bulan ha Mayo,
Magpakadilain nga kabukaraan,
Di na kinahangalan nagatanan ngaranan, may bukad hin kahoy, may may bukad nga buhi:
bukad nga nsunog sugad han kalayo,
hinin kasingkasing kun bulan ha May.

May ada kadam'an nga di' taga dinhi,
nga mga minamat ha lain nga bingi,
Ha iba nga tuna nganhi ihinalit...
Kundi di ko gugma an taga hirayo
Asay ko an aton mga bukad ha Mayo.
Videos
Echoes From The Farm
They say it is in town
that many joys are to be found
that it is there
where good things abound.

Nothing in waiting, they say,
nothing is unobtainable
whatever man may
in town desire.


The beauty of Eastern Visayas
Shared a Photo
Bowaon And Totoon
105 likes 23 comments 1 share
Story and Poems of Eastern Visayas
let's go discover the hidden treasure of the Easten Visayas
#MoreFunInThePhilippines
Region 8: Eastern Visayas
Thank you ALL
#Finished

(Falsehood and Truth)
Eastern Visayas
is one of the 17 regions of the Philippines, designated as Region VIII. It is composed of three main islands, Peyote and Samar, connected by the San Juanico Bridge, and Biliran Island. It consists of six provinces, namely, Biliran(capital Naval), Eastern Samar(Borongan), Leyte(Tacloban), Northern Samar(Catarman), Samar(Catbalolan), Southern Leyte(Maasin City).
The literature of Eastern Visayas refers to the literature written in Waray and Cebuano by writers from the region. Of the two, it is Waray literature that has been collected, recorded, and documented by scholars and researchers, a movement largely spurred by the interest of German priests, managing a university in Tacloban City, who saw the necessity of gathering and preserving the literary heritage of the region. It is in this light that whenever East Visayan literature is written about, it is usually Waray literature that is being described.
Once upon a time, there were two friends, Bowaon and Totoon. They couldn’t find work so they decided to go away from their place to look for their fortune somewhere. They brought with them rice and then they mounted their horses. As they went on, they got hungry. From a distance, they saw a coral reef. They got off their horses and headed for the reef to catch fish. There, they caught schools of fish but they were very tiny. Totoon forgot his hunger. He returned the fish he caught to the reef. Bowaon got angry. “How will we able to eat?” he scolded. “Never mind Bowaon, they are so tiny; they will still grow bigger,” Totoon replied.
They rode on their horses again. After a distance, they saw a dead man. Totoon asked Bowaon to stop so they could bury the body. But, Bowaon got angry, “Are you out of mind? If somebody sees us, he’ll think we killed him.”
“But we should show mercy. There is a way of finding the truth. Well, if you won’t help me, then I will bury him by myself. You may go onward if you please. I’ll follow later,” decided Totoon.
Bowaon went ahead while Totoon dug a hole for the body. Then he carried the dead and buried him. He prayed over it then went on his journey. Bowaon could not bear to leave him so he returned for Totoon. They therefore, set out together again. Trotting along, they heard babies cried. They went towards the direction of the sounds. They found hungry baby eagles in a nest.
“Let’s stop for a while and feed the eagles,” suggested Totoon. Then bowaon saw that Totoon was going to kill his horse.
“Are you foolish? When they grow up they’ll prey on you. Let’s go on, we’re already delayed,” Bowaon said.
“Don’t mind me. I pity these baby eagles. Anyway, no debt goes unpaid. Go ahead, I’ll just follow.”

Totoon did not say anything. He got a paddle and rode far out to the sea. There, he cired his fate. No longer after, he heard a voice. It was a fish asking him why he as crying. Totoon unburdened his problem. After listening, the fish dived deep into the sea. When it surfaced, many fishes came up with it, each one with a ring in its snout. Totoon looked among the rings. The king’s ring was not there. The fishes dived again. When they came up, they were bringing the king’s ring. Totoon thanked the fish.
“Don’t mention it,” said the fish. Actually we are only paying the favor you showed us before hen you threw us back into the reef.” Then they left.
The king rejoiced that the ring had been found. He held a banquet. Now, Bowaon had plenty of work again. He did not like it. In the banquet, the king announced the forthcoming marriage of Totoon and the princess. Bowaon was very angry. There would be much work ahead. He thought of a plan to thwart the wedding. But it did not succeed.
After the wedding, Bowaon went to the king. “Your majesty,” he said. “I heard Totoon say that on the third day, the princess will give birth.”
The king got mad. He once more summoned Totoon. “Do you mean to say that you had an affair with the princess even before you got married? You scoundrel! But since you’re already my child, I can’t do anything. However, do what you’ve said---that the princess will give birth three days from now. If not, you’ll surely lose your head.”
Totoon cried in despair. The princess comforted him by saying she’d talk with her father, but he couldn’t be calmed. After a while, an eagle came. “Don’t cry Totoon,” she began. “This time I’ll help you in payment for help you extended my children. Get a midwife and talk to her. I’ll bring you a newly-born child.” Then the eagle flew away.he muttered.

When she came back, she had an infant, still dripping with blood. In the bedroom, the midwife acted as if there really was a delivery. When the king awoke he heard the ones of an infant. He was amazed that the princess did give birth. He forgot his anger. “It must be a miracle,”
“If you go on with your silly ideas, I’ll not give you a ride,” threatened Bowaon.
“Then I’ll walk,” decided Totoon. “Even if I go slowly, I’ll still reach my destination.
After killing his horse, he fed the eagles. When they feel asleep, Totoon left. Bowaon again had returned to give Totoon a ride. Far ahead, they sighted a palace. “Let’s go,” suggested Bowaon. “Let’s ask the king for work.”
They knocked at the palace door. They were told to enter, but since it was late, they were not granted any audience with the king. They slept in the palace. “You see,” taunted Bowaon, “if you did not delay our trip, we should’ve been able to eat. You are the cause of all this.” They went to sleep nevertheless since they were so tired from their journey.
After a while, Totoon heard his name called. “Rise Totoon and listen, in the morning, when the king calls you for breakfast, don’t eat at once. On the table you’ll see a pen and some cooking utensils. Sit near the pen, and your future will be bright. Don’t be surprised. I am the dead whom you have buried. I came to pay the favor you showed me.” Everything went silent and Totoon feel asleep again.
In the morning, the two friends were called for breakfast by the king. As he was told the night before, he saw the pen and some cooking utensils on the table. Bowaon sat down and just as soon began eating.
“You Totoon will become my secretary, while you Bowaon, will become my cook,” announced the king.
At first, Bowaon was glad with his work for it meant plenty of food. He would not go hungry. But as time went on, he began to envy Totoon for the latter was not fatigued much. He thought of smearing the name of his friend.
One day, Bowaon went to the king to report that he heard Totoon say that the latter would be able to find the ring the king lost within three days and that the reward will be marriage to the princess. Of course, the king got angry for he did not say anything like that. He had Totoon summoned to his hall. Totoon protested the accusation but the angry king would not listen to him.
“Go, look for the ring then and if you find it you will have the princess for a reward but, if you fail you will lose your head,” announced the king.


“If you go on with your silly ideas, I’ll not give you a ride,” threatened Bowaon.
“Then I’ll walk,” decided Totoon. “Even if I go slowly, I’ll still reach my destination.
After killing his horse, he fed the eagles. When they feel asleep, Totoon left. Bowaon again had returned to give Totoon a ride. Far ahead, they sighted a palace. “Let’s go,” suggested Bowaon. “Let’s ask the king for work.”
They knocked at the palace door. They were told to enter, but since it was late, they were not granted any audience with the king. They slept in the palace. “You see,” taunted Bowaon, “if you did not delay our trip, we should’ve been able to eat. You are the cause of all this.” They went to sleep nevertheless since they were so tired from their journey.
After a while, Totoon heard his name called. “Rise Totoon and listen, in the morning, when the king calls you for breakfast, don’t eat at once. On the table you’ll see a pen and some cooking utensils. Sit near the pen, and your future will be bright. Don’t be surprised. I am the dead whom you have buried. I came to pay the favor you showed me.” Everything went silent and Totoon feel asleep again.
In the morning, the two friends were called for breakfast by the king. As he was told the night before, he saw the pen and some cooking utensils on the table. Bowaon sat down and just as soon began eating.
“You Totoon will become my secretary, while you Bowaon, will become my cook,” announced the king.
At first, Bowaon was glad with his work for it meant plenty of food. He would not go hungry. But as time went on, he began to envy Totoon for the latter was not fatigued much. He thought of smearing the name of his friend.
One day, Bowaon went to the king to report that he heard Totoon say that the latter would be able to find the ring the king lost within three days and that the reward will be marriage to the princess. Of course, the king got angry for he did not say anything like that. He had Totoon summoned to his hall. Totoon protested the accusation but the angry king would not listen to him.
“Go, look for the ring then and if you find it you will have the princess for a reward but, if you fail you will lose your head,” announced the king.
Earliest accounts of this literature date back to 1668 when a Spanish Jesuit by the name of Fr. Francisco Ignacio Alzina documented the poetic forms such as the candu, haya, ambahan, canogon, bical, balac, siday and awit. He also described the susumaton and posong, early forms of narratives. Theater tradition was very much in place - in the performance of poetry, rituals, and mimetic dances. Dances mimed the joys and activities of the ancient Waray.

With three centuries of Spanish colonization and another period of American occupation, old rituals, poetic forms and narratives had undergone reinvention. A case in point is the balac, a poetic love joust between a man and a woman. According to Charo N. Cabardo, a Waray Historian, the balac retained its form even as it took new names and borrowed aspects of the languages of the colonizers. During the Spanish period, the balac was called the amoral; during the American occupation, it was renamed ismayling, a term derived from the English word "smile." According to a literary investigator, in certain areas of Samar, the same balac form or ismayling has been reinvented to express anti-imperialist sentiments where the woman represents the motherland and the man, the patriot who professes his love of country.
An Balud

Daw nasusunog sidsid han langit
Pati han dagat nadadalit
Bangin ha unhan, may nagcaingin,
May madlos huyog hinin hangin.

Inin mganga balud, mulayan han dagat
Nga dit na calawdan, nagbabalatbagat.
An gabi nga dulom, an tubig maranggat
Ng nacacaliaw manga dumaragat.
English Translation:

An Waves
(Translated by Lilia Tolentino, SPC)

Heaven and sea seems to be on fire
Perhaps there's a
kaingin
somewhere
There's a strong wind
Blowing the waves.

These waves are toys of the sea
Coming from the occean
Where night encounters the dark
Bright waves give hope to sea




(Translated by the staff of Laeyte-Samar Studies)
But surely there
no bird songs are heard.
no
mayas
arescattered
in the field of ripening grain.

And sometimes night finds them
still companionably eating
in the hills, the plains,
and inthe ricefeild

Of our poverty
I don't complain,
for life in town
I have no envy.

For here shines as well
the sun and the moon
and here the gentle breeze
is balm for weariness.

Flower of May
Bukad na Mayo
(
Eduardo Macabenta
)
(Translated by the staff of Leyte-Samar Studies)
How lovely and how choice
Are the iliang-ilang, champaca and sampaguita
The fragrant roses, rosal, and azucena:
Their scent fills the air
And is wafted far away...
Sweet flowers of May.
Flowers cover our native land
So exquisite they captive the mind
The waling-waling and other orchids
With colors to delight the eyes
Loved or not, they are still admireder,
Though they wither fast, they are flowers of May
Even the common gumamela
In tthe morning very proudly blooms,
The calachuchi, the marigold,
Have beauty ang fragrance to rival others,
We don't have to go to other places,
We have many flowers of all kinds have we
No need is there to name them,
There are plant flowers, and live flowers, too
Who are the adornment of uor existence,
Flowers that can burn our hearts
Like fire in the month of May
Many of these flowers come fron far
They have blossomed from the alien seeds
Or have been transplanted from other lands
Their beauty has no price....
Yet they are not my choice
I prefer our own flowers of May.

Who cares if the bones in the soup are already a year old
In that can to which they keep adding water?
We amight be slurping hot pig slop,
Fine enough if it is thick and well-flavored

We do not have to follow the ways of Manila.
For tasty is the chopsuey with rising water;
It is not in keeping for our government to just follow
Or to go this way or that or be indecisive.
Full transcript