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Transitions

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by

Janelle Blount

on 12 August 2013

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Transcript of Transitions

Transitions
Transitions help establish logical
connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers.
Where do you use
transitions?
Transitions
do the following:
Transitions can be single words,
quick phrases or full sentences.
• signal relationships between ideas

• helps writers to convey ideas clearly and concisely

• provide the reader with directions for how to piece together your ideas into a logically coherent argument.

• function as signs for readers that tell
them how to think about, organize, and
react to old and new ideas as they read
through what you have written.
A transition between paragraphs can be a word or two, a phrase, or a sentence. I prefer to see between paragraph transitions at the beginning of the new paragraph. You will see an example of this near the end of this lesson.
As with transitions between sections and paragraphs, transitions within paragraphs act as cues by helping readers to anticipate what is coming before they read it. Within paragraphs, transitions tend to be
single words
or
short phrases
.
Transitions within paragraphs
Where do you use
transitions?
Transitions between paragraphs
Examples: in addition to, additionally, furthermore, also, equally important, similarly, then, finally, etc.

Refer to the transitions unit handout
for more.
Examples: for example, for instance, additionally, also, etc.
Refer to the transitions unit handout for more.
You know you need to use transitions when . . .
• Your instructor has written comments like “choppy,” “jumpy,” “abrupt,” “doesn't flow,” “need signposts,” or “how is this related?” on your papers.
• Your readers (instructors, friends, or classmates) tell you that they had trouble following your organization or train of thought.
• You tend to write the way you think—and your brain often jumps from one idea to another pretty quickly.
• You wrote your paper in several discrete “chunks” and then pasted them together.
• You are working on a group paper; the draft you are working on was created by pasting pieces of several people’s writing together.

Transitions in Action . . .
Sources:
The Writing Center – The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Anonymous English 101 student
Monmouth University
Example:
In the novel, there are many tragic events that take place. The prince’s untimely death occurs two days before the wedding.
Revision:
In the novel, there are many tragic events that take place.
For example
, the prince’s untimely death occurs two days before the wedding.

Rationale:
The transition helps to connect the idea to the example that follows.
Transitions within Paragraphs
Example:
Paragraph 1:
The author’s work includes many examples of symbolism.
Paragraph 2
In the story, multiple themes are present.
Revision:
Paragraph 1:
The author’s work includes many examples of symbolism.
Paragraph 2:
In addition to the symbolism in the text
, multiple themes are present.

Transitions between
Paragraphs
Rationale:
The transition helps to show how the two paragraphs are related and helps to show the reader the underlying similarities.
Full transcript