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If I can stop one

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by

Nicole Quiñones

on 21 August 2013

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Transcript of If I can stop one

If I can stop one
heart from breaking

Emily Dickinson
She was born in Amherst Massachusetts (December 10, 1830-May 15, 1886). Throughout her life, she seldom left her house and visitors were few. The people with whom she did come in contact had an enormous impact on her poetry.

By the 1860s, Dickinson lived in almost total physical
isolation from the outside world, but actively
maintained many correspondences and read
widely.


If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
Nicole Quiñones
12-1
Advanced English
Dickinson's poetry reflects her loneliness and the speakers of her poems generally live in a state of want. Her poems are also marked by the intimate recollection of inspirational moments which are decidedly life-giving and suggest the possibility of happiness. Her work was heavily influenced by the Metaphysical poets of seventeenth-century England.
While Dickinson was extremely prolific as a poet and regularly enclosed poems in letters to friends, she was not publicly recognized during her lifetime. The first volume of her work was published posthumously in 1890 and the last in 1955.

Upon her death, Dickinson's family discovered 40 handbound volumes of nearly 1800 of her poems, or "fascicles" as they are sometimes called.

If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help
one fainting robin
Unto
his nest again,
I
shall
not
live in
vain.

About the Author
Poem
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